Chapter 06

Chapter 06 - Warrant Arrest After Arrest Criminal Court...

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Criminal Justice, 4 th Edition Chapter 6 The Criminal Justice System
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Agencies of Criminal Justice Law Enforcement Courts . . . Corrections
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Procedural Law Specifies how people who are suspected, accused, and convicted of crimes will be treated. Criminal Procedure is guided by the Bill of Rights (first 10 constitutional amendments).
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Probable Cause Defined as: A reasonable link between a specific person and a particular crime, given the totality of circumstances The threshold required before police can arrest or engage in a search of an individual or an individual’s property
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4 th Amendment “The right of people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable search and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”
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Unformatted text preview: Warrant Arrest After Arrest Criminal Court Procedure Grand Jury Indictment Types of Trials Standard of Proof • The standard of proof for determining guilt is the same during a bench trial or a jury trial • The judge or jury must determine guilt beyond a reasonable doubt Findings • Acquittal – – finding of not guilty after trial • Conviction – – finding of guilty after trial Sentencing • Judge decides most appropriate sentence within limits of law • Presentence investigation report is done to help judge match sentence to offender Appeals • Reviews of lower court decisions by higher courts to look for errors of law or procedure • Appellate courts do not hear new trials • Appeals are called ‘briefs’ and explain legal errors alleged to have been made during the trial • If there is no basis for appeal, it is dismissed • If there is basis, a hearing is held Appeals...
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2011 for the course CRIM 201 taught by Professor Losacco during the Fall '10 term at Rutgers.

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Chapter 06 - Warrant Arrest After Arrest Criminal Court...

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