CHAPTER 4

CHAPTER 4 - CHAPTER 4 COMMON LAW, STATUTORY LAW, AND...

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CHAPTER 4 COMMON LAW, STATUTORY LAW, AND ADMINISTRATIVE LAW
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QUOTE “I broke a mirror the other day. I'm supposed to get seven years of bad luck, but my lawyer thinks he can get me five.” Steven Wright
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COMMON LAW The common law is judge-made law. Stare Decisis “Let the decision stand” Precedent – previous decisions on similar facts Predictability v. Flexibility
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COMMON LAW Bystander Cases You have no duty to assist someone in peril unless you created the danger Union Pacific Railway Co. v. Cappier (1903) Exceptions Master-Servant Tarasoff v. Regents of The University of California (1976) Special relationships such as therapist-patient Mohr and Lindley - Train
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STATUTORY LAW Congress – National Legislature State Legislatures Congressional Process Bills Two houses (House of Representatives and Senate) – Either can originate a proposed statute, which is called a bill Both houses must vote on and approve a bill
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CHAPTER 4 - CHAPTER 4 COMMON LAW, STATUTORY LAW, AND...

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