CHA 2007 AR - Sri Lanka today is beset with social...

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Unformatted text preview: Sri Lanka today is beset with social inequalities, situations of conflict, abuses of basic human rights and natural disasters, imperilling her citizens’ dignity and self worth. The Consortium of Humanitarian Agencies (CHA) works with many partners and stakeholders to engage key issues, provide a voice and forum for people who need to be heard, and bring about discernible improvement in the lives of Sri Lankans. Working side by side with the community of humanitarian organizations operating in Sri Lanka, we help to create opportunity for social development and well-being for those who need them most. We retain a clear vision and programme amidsh the challenges in our society. Beyond addressing immediate needs, we focus on creating, preserving and securing social equity. We do everything we can, with whom we can, to build better lives for as many as we can. VISION CHA believes in the respect of diversity and the promotion and achievement of fundamental rights and freedom, which provides equal opportunities for development for all Sri Lankans. MISSION CHA works in the non-profit humanitarian sector to: CONVENE the leadership of the humanitarian community and other key stakeholders to engage and address critical and emerging issues involving their work; PROMOTE effective policies and a healthy environment to strengthen the work of non-profit humanitarian organizations and increase opportunities for funding and support; CHAMPION accountability, effective collaboration and co-ordination amongst and within the government, donors and humanitarian sectors; IDENTIFY and communicate the important role and contribution of the non-profit humanitarian sector in Sri Lanka; PROVIDE a centre of excellence, which collects, collates, analyses, documents and disseminates information; LEAD independent humanitarian sector organizations to help shape their future and the future of the society they serve. C ONTENTS [02.] [03.] [04.] [05.] [06.] [07.] [08.] [09.] [10.] [16.] [20.] [28.] [36.] [40.] [54.] [60.] [64.] [70.] [73.] [74.] [90.] [91.] [92.] [93.] [94.] [95.] [96.] Highlights Our Partners Main Collaboration Partners Funding Areas of Concentration Activity of Concentration Working on Our Own Proposed Areas Projects at a Glance - 2007 Chairman’s Message A Voice for the Voiceless: Answering a Clarion Call Treasuring the Rights of Man Putting Information where it is needed the most Providing Pathways…from Problem to Solution Benchmarking Standards and Good Governance Executive Director’s Message Our People Stewardship and Governance List of Publications Profile of the Membership Audit Committee Report Independent Auditor’s Report Statement of Financial Activities Balance Sheet Statement of Changes in Accumulated Fund Cash Flow Statement Notes to the Financial Statements Corporate Information [Inner Back Cover] OUR PARTNERS: 4,907 Both local and International MAIN COLLABORATION PARTNERS FOR 2007: The Government of the Netherlands Oxfam GB Diakonia PROJECTS WITH NGO COLLABORATION D evelopment of Strategic Framework for Peace E nvironment Disaster Management Programme H ealth and Livelihood Grants Programme H uman Security Response Programme P eace and Development Programme Regional Initiative Sustainable Livelihood & Enabling of Social and Political Participation (RSLSPP) R estoring Dignity and Protection for Conflict Affected Persons Funds INGOs/Donors provided to CHA Main areas of work in the year Relief, Rehabilitation & Development 35% Human Security Response 33% Peace & Development 20% Environmental Disaster Management 5% Psychosocial 4% Capacity-Building & Promotion of Professional Standards 3% Rs. 380,690,435 Funds provided to NGOs through CHA Rs. 36,768,187 3 Projects directly funded from private donors 34,041 by CHA People assisted in the year 13 Offices 2 CHA Our Partners The people who have reached out to us 30 G overnment agencies with whom we have worked for 1 1 years i ntervening organizations work with us on most projects 4 ,907 AN INTERACTIVE EFFORT AMONG PARTNERS CHA comprises five structured units, each deriving its particular functions from the organizational mandate, complementing one another in the pursuit of our mission. Complementary activities form an internal partnership between units and among the commissioned employees who staff them. Delivery is measured and evaluated according to the best international standards applying to agencies in our line of work - mitigating the effects of disaster and impoverishment in service of our country and its people. Government agencies, multilateral and bilateral donors, intervening organizations at the centre and in the regions, citizens and business, all those who seek to support, study and contribute to humanitarian relief work in Sri Lanka - these are our partners. partners worldwide 4,907 ANNUAL REPORT 2007 3 Main Collaboration Partners Our work in the Human Security Response Programme has enabled us to connect with 4,750 different entities around the world I n partnership with the government of the Netherlands o ver 15,000 families are targeted for direct assistance PARTNERSHIPS IN 2007 • The human security response programme which provides the operating platform for CHA, whose purpose is to ensure that individuals affected by disaster are free from fear and want, was supported by eight funding agencies, and established partnerships with a number of humanitarian networks. These networks connected us to 4,750 different entities. • Post-tsunami assistance to individual beneficiaries, channelled in large measure through two delivery mechanisms involving our own staff and scores of smaller NGOs and community organizations, created a second significant cluster of partnership, touching over 10000 families. • The Swedish arm of Diakonia, a faith-based organization dedicated to sustainable development for the most vulnerable, was our partner in support for environmental disaster management, working with delivery organizations in tsunami-affected districts. • CHA’s programme to improve the psychosocial well-being of disaster-affected persons was supported by six agencies, to the benefit of many who worked in the sector. The agencies were UNICEF, Helvitas, the Church of Sweden, Norwegian Church Aid, the United Nations’ Population Fund and Christian Children’s Fund Incorporated. • Working together with CHA, the Government of the Netherlands channelled assistance to people affected by conflict in eight districts. • Our work to promote peace and conflict sensitivity drew support from the World Bank, Norad, Cordaid, GTZ and the Government of Netherlands. • Several other partners contributed towards our work in the areas of livelihood development, promotion of humanitarian standards, strengthening the agency network and combined support for local NGOs (including district consortia). Among them were the Government of Switzerland, WorldVision, the Brookings Institute, The Asia Foundation, Oxfam Netherlands and American Jewish (JDC). • We concluded two new partnerships in 2007: the first was a collaboration between the Government of Netherlands and CHA to promote peace and development through national and local NGOs and agencies. The second, with Novib (the Dutch branch of Oxfam), focused on the promotion of sustainable livelihoods and access to social and political participation derived from the SAARC Social Charter. This was part of a programme active in five South Asian countries. 4 CHA Funding 35% was used for relief, rehabilitation and development work 99.82% and Europe sourced from Americas RECEIVED TOTAL FUNDING WORTH US $ 1,931,973 in the year 2007 RS. 216,381,013 in the year 2007 % Total income Relief, Rehabilitation & Development Human Security Response Peace & Development Environmental Disaster Management Psychosocial Capacity-Building & Promotion of Professional Standards Total 35% 33% 20% 5% 4% 3% 100% BUDGET AND EXPENDITURE IN 2007 Budget Rs. Relief, Rehabilitation & Development Human Security Response Peace & Development Environmental Disaster Management Psychosocial Capacity-Building & Promotion of Professional Standards Total 151,949,985 91,761,677 66,083,668 14,933,333 11,715,580 7,986,068 344,430,312 Disbursements Rs. 84,868,533 78,933,747 47,175,163 13,318,424 9,837,936 6,697,678 240,831,480 ANNUAL REPORT 2007 5 Areas of Concentration NORTH & EAST 20,059 people assisted war torn areas. in these 13,982 people were provided direct assistance in all other areas THE Y EAR R EVEALED T HE REQUIREMENT O F SUBSTANTIAL A SSISTANCE T O THE N ORTHERN & E ASTERN PROVINCES , W HICH W AS MAINLY R ELATED T O PROTECTION , L IVELIHOOD DEVELOPMENT A ND HEALTHCARE Jaffna CHA was physically present or involved in efforts to assist Sri Lankans affected by disaster in 2007. Some of these disasters were natural, while others were man-made, the outcome of conflict and poverty deprives people of dignity, another kind of disaster. Our work is spread across fifteen of Sri Lanka’s 25 districts. 6 CHA Activity of Concentration C HA works towards nurturing our environment and mitigating disasters Eradication of fear and want a human security response Working to achieve peace and development W orking on psychosocial well-being P romoting standards Our focus is on the well-being of individual human lives. Our greatest concern is for those whose every waking hour is filled with impoverishment and uncertainty. Other intervening factors and actors are important, but secondary to the realization of our goals. WE ARE DRIVEN BY THE SPIRIT AND IDEOLOGY OF HUMANISM EMPOWERMENT OF PEOPLE IN NEED ANNUAL REPORT 2007 7 Working on Our Own 34,041 195 people were provided direct assistance Sri Lankans employed and present in 14 districts working across the country and the South Asian region WE ARE A SRI LANKAN AGENCY, GROUNDED IN OUR SOCIETY AND OPERATING IN THE THREE LANGUAGES COMMONLY USED BY OUR PEOPLE Most of our staff are Sri Lankan nationals. CHA, as per its licence, services co-ordination, facilitation and networking for approximately 4,750 entities. We offer an information platform for the transfer of knowledge, advocating the cause of and directly assisting people in need, while pursuing the goal of excellence in all that we do. 8 CHA Proposed Areas W ork towards development achieved by others in the region P romote investment, skills and resources to drive non-discriminatory development in Sri Lanka Promoting private and public partnership P reserve the integrity and independence of a financially secure non-profit sector AN INCREASE IN PRIVATE SECTOR INVOLVEMENT IN HUMANITARIAN ISSUES THROUGH THE IDENTIFICATION OF APPROPRIATE NEEDS AND THE PROVISION OF MANAGEMENT SERVICES FUTURE AND CONTINUED FOCUS ON CONFLICT AFFECTED AND LAGGING REGIONS INCLUDING THE PLANTATION SECTOR WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS We see ourselves increasingly basing our work on strengthened concepts of partnership. This includes bringing on line enhanced visibility of support from private and profit sector philanthropy, in and outside Sri Lanka, assisting and guiding in collaboration and forging pathways for development in geographical areas of inequity and with a simultaneous focus for post-conflict recovery and development in the North-East. We will concentrate on increasing businesses’ involvement in the humanitarian sector by helping companies identify appropriate needs, regions and target groups for CSR projects and helping them run these projects. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 9 Projects at a Glance - 2007 Programme Area P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 Total Expenditure in LKR - 74,058,273 Human Security Response Programme (HSRP) Total Budget Rs. 86,188,532 Project Period - Jan. to Dec. 2007 Project Title/Details Oxfam GB 12,624,001 10,557,286 21,430,062 1,439,603 5,031,499 51,082,451 Diakonia 5,290,645 4,159,505 6,923,868 382,202 918,904 17,675,124 JDC 2,337,326 59,619 377,429 1,062 6,827 2,782,263 Programme Area Project Title Project Period Promotion of Livelihood for Tsunami Survivors in SL May ‘06 Mar. ‘07 Promotion of Livelihood for Tsunami Affected and Vulnerable People Mar. ‘06 Dec. ‘07 Tsunami Response Sustainable Livelihood Development in Sri Lanka Aug. ‘07 Jul. ‘08 Health & Livelihood Grants Programme May ‘06 Apr. ‘07 Human Security Response Programme (HSRP) Jan. '07 Dec. '07 Psychosocial Forum (PSF) Jan. ‘07 Dec. ‘07 Printing Psychosocial Guidelines Sep. '07 Dec. '07 PA 1 Printing Report of Long-Term Strategic Planning May '07 Dec. '07 Research to Professionalize Psychosocial Work in Sri Lanka Jan. '07 Jul. ‘07 Apr. '07 Sep. ‘07 Strengthening of Regional Psychosocial Network Jan. '07 Dec. '08 10 CHA Funder/Expenditure SCiSL – – 22,700 – – 22,700 Care Int. 69,200 – – – – 69,200 FORUT – 44,130 – – – 44,130 World Vision 184,488 612,316 244,491 175,000 – 1,216,295 MercyCorps – – 1,166,110 – – 1,166,110 Principal Process Owner Jeevan Thiagarajah Executive Director [email protected] Total Budget Expenditure for the Year 2007 Funder Principal Process Owner Rs. 12,500,000 (SEK 1,000,000) Rs. 10,610,957 Diakonia Rs. 5,229,945 Rs. 4,907,856 MercyCorps SL Dhanya Ratnavale Manager Regional Programme/ Relief & Rehabilitation [email protected] Rs. 5,000,000 Rs. 314,616 American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee Rs. 127,500,000 Rs. 38,515,798 Americares Hishanthi Soysa Manager-P1 [email protected] Rs. 21,591,274 Rs. 20,505,660 Oxfam GB/ Diakonia/JDC & World Vision Rs. 4,957,400 Rs. 4,892,819 Norwegin Church Aid United Nations Population Fund. Chrishara Parnavithana United Nations Population Fund. Psychosocial Co-ordinator [email protected] Rs.1,899,775 Rs. 1,899,736 Rs. 257,500 Rs. 257,500 Rs. 1,000,000 Rs. 916,200 Rs. 1,000,000 Rs. 254,528 Helvetas Sri Lanka Christian Children's Fund Inc. Rs. 2,520,000 Rs. 613,935 Helvetas Sri Lanka ANNUAL REPORT 2007 11 Programme Area Project Title Project Period Landmine Ban Advocacy Forum (LBAF)-06/07 PA 1 Landmine Ban Advocacy Forum Web Page (LBAF-Web page)-06/07 Civil Society Network on Information Sharing Dec. '06 Dec. '07 Development & Twinning of Schools in Dec. '06 Dec. '07 PA 2 Matara District & Dep. of Des Hautes_Pyrenees (France) JICA Japan NGO Desk-06/07 Apr. '06 Mar.'07 Peace and Development Nov. '03 Sep. '07 Mainstreaming Conflict Sensitivity Sep. '07 Jul. ‘07 Apr. '09 Jun. ‘09 Feb. ‘08 Advisory Services for Conflict Tranformation Jan. ‘07 Civil Society Peace Tabloid Regional Initiative on Sustainanable Livelihood and Enabling of Social & Political Participation Jan. ‘07 Apr. '04 Dec. ‘07 Mar. '07 PA 3 Restoring Dignity and Protection of IDP’s Aug. ‘07 Jul. ‘08 Assisting IDP's with Immediate needs in North & East Jul. ‘07 Sep. ‘07 Relief Programme for Conflict Affected IDP's Newsletter on Displacement Jun. '05 Jan. '08 Juvenile Justice Programme Aug. '07 Jul. '08 Legal Aid to IDP's in North & East Aug. '07 Jul. '08 12 CHA Total Budget Expenditure for the Year 2007 Funder Principal Process Owner Rs. 212,187 Rs. 80,694 Rs. 6,835 Rs. 18,876 UNDP Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs Chathurika Jayawardana LBAF Coordinator [email protected] Rs. 180,500 Rs. 5,175 Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs Rs. 1,500,000 Rs. 522,760 The Berghof F undation Lalith Samaraweera Information Analyst [email protected] Rs.250,000 Rs. 211,462 Secours Populaire Francais (SPF) Jayanthi Somasekeram Senior IT Advisor [email protected] Francis Fernando Manager Programme Area - 2 [email protected] Rs.2,781,915 Rs. 428,099 JICA Japan International Cooperation Agency Euro 450,000 SEK 2,000,000 NOK 700,000 Rs. 22,884,998 RS. 3,731,405 Rs. 5,580,584 RNE SIDA Norwegian Embassy US$ 247,627 US$ 100,000 Rs. 2,020,000 Rs. 2,873,053 Rs. 1,781,933 Rs. 1,206,726 World Bank Norwegian Embassy German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) Bernadine Jayawardene Manager - Peace Related Activities [email protected] Rs. 3,339,000 EUR 375,000 Rs. 2,658,597 Rs. 11,175,643 P&D Unit N(o)vib Oxfam Netherlands Royal Netherlands E mbassy International Medical Health Organization Dhanya Ratnavale Manager Regional Programme/ Relief & Rehabilitation [email protected] EUR 1,500,000 Rs. 15,127,583 Rs. 2,203,600 Rs. 2,203,582 US$ 111,300 Rs.2,771,370 Rs. 1,666,392 Rs. 2,304,766 Diakonia Brookings Institution P&D Unit Chathuri Jayasooriya Programme Officer-Advocacy [email protected] Rs. 1,642,621 Rs. 1,549,654 Rs. 1,338,000 Rs. 202,276 Brookings Institution ANNUAL REPORT 2007 13 Programme Area Project Title Project Period Environmental Disaster Management Programme Apr. '06 May '09 Developing Strategic Framework for Peace Oct. '06 Sep. '07 Strengthening Local Capacity for Peace Building Oct. '07 Sep. '08 Capacity Building, Documentation and Advocacy Support Jan. '06 Jan. '07 PA 3 HRAC Training Reducing Incidences and Effects of Torture Project Aug. '07 Apr. '08 Citizen Demand Survey IASC Guidelines workshop Key Policy Maker Course (PMC) Promotion of Human Security, Core Support for District Consortia Jan. '07 Dec. '07 PA 4 Sphere Standards - Sinhala Translation Support for Local NGOs Jun. ‘05 Jun. '07 Strengthening the Humanitarian Agencies' Network Oct. '06 May '07 Others 14 CHA Total Budget Expenditure for the Year 2007 Funder Principal Process Owner Rs. 56,000,000.00 Rs. 13,318,424 Diakonia Anjali Watson/R J Rohita de Silva Environment Consultant/Finance Officer [email protected][email protected] Rs. 6,641,934 Rs. 5,559,229 CordAID International CordAID International The Asia Foundation (TAF) World Vision SL The Asia Foundation AcNielsen Rs. 8,333,748 Rs. 898,637 Fareeha Jaleel Assistant Manager [email protected] Rs. 1,987,093 Rs. 229,846 Rs. 210,000 Rs. 1,088,000 Rs. 210,000 Rs. 378,933 D D A W Prabu Project Coordinator - PHRMI Project [email protected] Rs. 483,990 Rs. 483,990 Shammi Nissanka Manager - HR/Administration [email protected] Rs.526,000 Rs. 526,000 Private Donor Chrishara Parnavithana Psychosocial Coordinator [email protected] Rs. 527,744 Rs. 393,417 Helvetas Sri Lanka Rs. 10,041,904 Rs. 5,035,833 Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs M F Hashim Deputy Executive Director [email protected] Rs. 907,650 Rs. 1,300,000 Rs. 298,400 Rs. 445,280 Oxfam GB CHA (Reserves) Gihani Maryn Coordinator Membership Services [email protected] Rs.9,505,000 USAID acting through DAI V Kalaichelvan District Officer CHA Trincomalee [email protected] ANNUAL REPORT 2007 15 Chairman’s Message INTRODUCTION It is with great pleasure that we present the Annual Report of 2007. As we complete the 11th year of our operations, our organization which is mandated to be in close partnership with intervening agencies has shown a significant growth in its activities and is involved in supporting a membership which in turn addresses key issues such as advocacy, human rights, human security, psychosocial initiatives, relief, rehabilitation and development, protecting the environment, networking, furtherance and maintenance of professional standards amongst humanitarian agencies, training, the promotion of peace, knowledge and dissemination of information amongst others, particularly those engaged in the field of humanitarian endeavour. The organization is served by a committed staff of 184, working around the country, to translate our vision into reality. ENVIRONMENT Our achievements are all the more remarkable considering the volatile environment we have had to work in. The deepening crisis in the North and East meant an inevitable shrinkage of humanitarian space in areas where it was most needed. But this was also a year where the Government and the humanitarian sector started to engage meaningfully in addressing these needs through mechanisms that shared a common vision. Tangible results, sometimes achieved quickly, and sometimes involving long discussions and lobbying, have been achieved for the benefit of the affected communities. A BRIEFING ON OUR WORK In its role as co-ordinator, CHA has managed to conduct weekly operational meetings, bringing together members and non-members of CHA to one platform to discuss issues related to their work. We have also achieved similar levels of performance at all other forums. The Livelihood Forum and the Environmental Forum, which commenced their operations in 2005, and were further strengthened in 2007, are two such examples. Whilst agreed services for membership continued, emphasis was given to small group meetings. Members were met in person to discuss issues pertaining to their work. A total of 19 such group meetings were held during the first half of the year. 16 CHA “CHA made a significant contribution with the largest funding inflow amongst our grants assisting tsunami and conflict victims” In its advocacy initiatives, CHA continued to engage with relevant parties, such as the Government, the donors, the media etc., on behalf of the humanitarian sector at various national and district level forums. Also in response to recurring interest, CHA took the lead in opening the floor for an advocacy forum meeting, bringing together the advocacy staff of agencies to share their experiences and thinking with others. The Advocacy Forum led the Media Working Group to deal with negative publicity in the media. Furthermore, our networks in the Knowledge Management and Information Centre were broadened with the commencement of two new projects, namely eTwinning and Civil Society Network on Information Sharing (CSNIS). The unit provides Advisory Services on information technology, in addition to providing translation and editing services. CHA publishes newsletters, posters, booklets, and manuals among many other items, to reach all agencies and people of all communities. ‘Groundview’ is one such bimonthly journal, which was begun in January 2007 and is compiled by the Peace unit of CHA and disseminated by the Information Centre. In the field of direct assistance for those affected by disasters, CHA made a significant contribution with the largest funding inflow amongst our grants assisting tsunami and conflict victims in areas of health, livelihood and infrastructure support, whilst coordination meetings that provided a network and information sharing point in the districts between local, international and Government actors were conducted regularly. Our work with beneficiaries and people, directly, central to our mission, and with locally based organizations has strengthened our capacity and given us the networks and confidence to provide for sustained follow on activities including for those affected by conflict. CHA District Offices continued to work in collaboration with Community Based Organizations and local agencies through their operations with the Community Protection Network. In addition to work carried out by us, the resumption of war towards end of 2006, led CHA to be more involved in peace initiatives and IDP related advocacy. Through our involvement in the CCHA main and sub-committee meetings, CHA was able to lobby on issues of policy and humanitarian access on behalf of its members and all humanitarian agencies. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 17 Chairman’s Message STEERING COMMITTEE / BOARD OF DIRECTORS Following CHA’s incorporation under the Companies Guarantee Act in April 2007, the Steering Committee of 2007 was transformed into the Board of Directors. A combination of national and international personnel, this group of 10 experienced members constitutes the Board of Directors of CHA. The Board met six times during the year 2007 to discuss status of activities and finances of the organisation. It also discussed and reviewed the Code of Conduct for continuation of membership services. A Strategic Plan for 2008 and beyond was suggested at the last Board Meeting. ACKNOWLEDGMENT My sincere appreciation is extended to all the Members of Committees, our Secretaries, Auditors, Partners and all staff members of CHA - Head Office and District Offices under the stewardship of Mr. Jeevan Thiagarajah our Executive Director. We trust this Annual Report would provide you with an insight to all the work carried out in the year 2007. Whilst we engage in partnership with stakeholders and other actors in carrying out our activities for the future, CHA will continue to serve its members and beneficiaries with zeal in the years ahead. V. Kailasapillai Chairman March 6, 2008 18 CHA BUILDING BETTER LIVES FOR AS MANY AS WE CAN ANNUAL REPORT 2007 19 A Voice for the Voiceless: Answering a Clarion Call Freedom of speech is an inalienable human right. Yet, many are unable to exercise it because circumstances have rendered them voiceless. These people are victims of conflict, socio-economic deprivation and disenfranchisement in various forms. The degree of pathos and hopelessness that exists amongst those who are unheard and thus marginalized is great and deserves the unreserved attention of us all. We understand the need to address the plight of such people and have undertaken the task of lobbying on issues of those affected. We strive to initiate and encourage dialogue on policy issues between 20 CHA policymakers, administrators and civil-society representatives in order to promote suitable policies and responses by those in positions of authority. GENERAL ADVOCACY Having the power of voice means nothing if it is not used to speak of the rights of people; to those who have the power to take action. This means identifying target persons and bodies, approaching them and convincing them of changes that need to be made in order to improve the living conditions of normal citizens. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 21 Members participating in an Internal Advocacy Meeting An operational meeting in progress CHA has focussed on key areas in which it may advocate and obtain the support of relevant authorities and agencies. It identified the need for humanitarian assistance in terms of resettlement in Vakarai and Madhu/Mannar. The problems faced by humanitarian organizations due to a lack of frequent postal services to Jaffna and the need to revise the IDP ration rates in keeping with the increasing cost of living were brought to the attention of the relevant line ministries. Further, access for local staff of humanitarian agencies to uncontrolled areas was advocated with Defence Ministry officials. At the conclusion of these discussions a clear path for progress in these areas was put in place. During the course of the year, CHA carried out a fact finding mission in Muttur and Killiveddy on the resettlement of IDPs from Batticaloa. A comprehensive report containing statistics, needs of the people and the current situation was shared with humanitarian agencies. We approached the Human Rights Commission with a proposal to set up Forum based deliberations on issues such as rights of disabled women and children. A similar effort was directed at encouraging a private members motion to set in place a forum for public representation on human rights issues. Our presence and that of affiliate agencies in the Consultative Committee on Humanitarian Affairs and subcommittees gave effect to these crucial voices. CHA also met with various Government officials in its efforts to improve humanitarian standards. CHA represented I/NGOs, at a meeting with officials of the Ministry of Defence (MoD) to discuss humanitarian issues and security. Humanitarian assistance as well as space for humanitarian staff to carry out their mandate was advocated with relevant Ministries at the IDP Coordination Meeting - Ministry of Disaster Management and Human Rights, Consultative Committee on Humanitarian Action Meeting - Ministry of Defense and IASC. Security related issues were discussed with security commanders of the newly settled areas. Agencies were encouraged to extend their support to the needy in Vakarai and Vellaveli with an assurance from the Security Forces to ensure security to agencies. CONVERGING VOICES The Colombo HSRP Office has become a coordinating centre catering to NGO, media and research persons and projects visiting us for information and assistance. We act now as a national service provider for the NGO sector through facilitation of meetings, coordination of data collection, circulating information, participation at various events, forums, workshop, information gathering, checking and verification, and overall Gaps Analysis for weekly Operational Meetings and for general use and dissemination. Operational Meetings have a regular attendance of approximately 60-80 agency representatives. 22 22 CHA General Assembly in progress CHA staff meeting with Donor Organization representatives Our membership services inlcude: Code of Practice for membership, group meetings for membership, meeting on human rights, support for local NGOs, newsletters in local languages and directory with a database. District Operational Meetings aim at collecting information on sector based activities of the particular district to date and discuss the challenges being faced and how to better coordinate their activities. To facilitate further the work of CHA’s members, a collective appeal on tax remission for I/NGOs was submitted to the Ministry of Finance. Following discussion among all CHA members, a proposal on I/NGO taxation was submitted to the Ministry of Finance. The issues covered therein were those that arose in those discussions and included taxation of non-profit work, taxing donations and grants and the danger of multiple taxation from recipient agencies and partners. The appeal is pending though an initial positive response was received. A discussion paper on issues that organizations face in the Vanni region was also drafted and circulated. The revised paper incorporating comments is to be sent to bilateral donors. A key desired outcome was to receive support to ease the operational constraints of these organizations. During the course of this year, CHA disseminated information to agencies for feedback on a number of subjects. These included, issues concerning the Vanni region, construction material requirements in Jaffna, assistance for Vakarai resettlement and cleaning of wells in Vakarai, the response to the situation in Batticaloa and Vakarai. It was hoped a comprehensive rehabilitation plan would be forthcoming. Other issues ranged from an information collection format for the Disaster Management Centre, the urgent needs of the newly displaced in Batticaloa and meetings for agencies interested in assisting in Vakarai. Information on humanitarian sector activities were also provided through the CHA Public Reports initiative, the link to IASC leaflets on the right to return and the UN security update. STRENGTHENING TIES WITH THE MEDIA The support of the media is an important factor for any NGO and especially critical for those working in the humanitarian sector and dealing with sensitive issues involving human life. We strongly feel that to be understood for what we do, and to understand the role that the media plays in our sphere of activity, strengthening of ties is key. During the course of the year, steps were taken to cultivate stronger relations between I/NGOs and the media in Sri Lanka, one of the main initiatives being the meetings held with Editors. The need to meet with Editors of various media was identified following the Advocacy Forum and was facilitated by the Press Complaints Commission in Sri Lanka which organized the meeting with heads of organizations and key Editors. This further enhanced appreciation of our collective and bilateral efforts and established a two-way process in the exchange of information. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 23 23 Planning Session on the Voice of Children Programme World Day on Prevention of Child Abuse KEEPING AN EYE ON CHILDREN The rights of the child to peace, education, growth, health and a voice in society is a key objective of CHA and our partners. The vital role of the child, as the future of any country can never be over emphasized. Many of the children that CHA strives to support are those who have not received proper guidance and care but show promise to grow up into well-rounded adults. The Voice of Children (VOC) project was a significant development, for which a concept paper was prepared during the course of the year. The project creates a space for children to express freely themselves while building their capacity in advocacy. The project endeavours to bridge the gap between the needs of children in distress or poverty and the services provided by various institutions and organizations working to uplift children. The ultimate goal is to ensure timely redress of children’s issues through the development of a mechanism owned and operated by children to report incidents of child abuse or child rights violations, to seek assistance during emergencies and receive advisory services. A three-tier network has been developed for child protection. The first tier comprising of eminent persons at the policy level, the second tier consists of child rights activists, media personnel and humanitarian workers, while the third tier is made up of community members at the grassroot level. An Advisory Board (AB) comprising experts in the field has been formed to guide the VOC team. CHA’s Juvenile Justice Programme aims to develop a standardized, holistic mechanism to protect, rehabilitate and reintegrate children in conflict with the law. It also works to prevent physical and psychological abuse suffered by children within the juvenile justice programme. Advocacy initiatives were made to restructure the juvenile transportation system and make it more child-friendly. The principle objective of this endeavour is to protect children from possible abuse by adult prisoners, while in transit or staying overnight with adult prisoners. CHA, with the support of JWT Sri Lanka, renovated and painted the Juvenile Court premises, improved the sanitation facilities and fumigated the premises making it more pleasant. In addition, the Children’s Room was refurbished and new bedding material, a notice board to display the children’s creative work as well as games and refreshments and a ‘befriender’ to keep them company while they wait for their cases to be heard, were provided. In terms of supporting development and promoting assistance to schools with scarce resources, CHA adopted the Magulpokuna Schools in the remote village of Welikanda in Pollonnaruwa. 24 24 CHA A meeting of the Landmine Ban Forum in progress Discussion/meeting with CHA membership LANDMINE BAN ADVOCACY FORUM Large areas of the North and East of Sri Lanka have been rendered uninhabitable or hazardous by residual munitions, mainly landmines. Civilians including children have been among those who have been killed or injured as a result. In 2007 de-mining activity continued in Sri Lanka despite the difficulties caused by renewed conflict. It is to bring an end to the destruction and trauma that landmines were causing to people living in these areas that the CHA established the Landmine Ban Advocacy Forum (LBAF). The LBAF consists of representatives of UN agencies, local and international NGOs, the donor community, the Sri Lanka Army and mine action agencies. The objective of the Forum is to provide a common platform bringing together individuals as well as organizations interested in advocating for a total ban on the use of anti-personnel landmines within Sri Lanka. The forum seeks to create awareness amongst the general public, on the core and related issues involving landmines. This is largely accomplished through topical and insightful media releases and radio programmes. In commemoration of the 10th Anniversary of the adoption of the Ottawa Treaty on September 18, a radio interview was conducted over the local channel Lite 89.2 FM, which highlighted and offered valuable insights. Members of the LBAF meet, share information and brief each other on their individual advocacy initiatives. They also undertake joint activities and ensure that a strong and emphatic attempt is made to guarantee that anti-personnel landmines are never used within the territory of Sri Lanka. The LBAF established the Eminent Persons Group as an initiative to bring more focus to the urgent need for a ban on anti-personnel landmines. The Eminent Persons Group will lobby relevant authorities to raise public awareness on banning the use of anti-personnel landmines. MAKING THE COURTS MORE CHILD-FRIENDLY Following CHA’s intervention through the Juvenile Justice Programme, the Chief Justice has ruled that cases in Magistrate’s Court involving children are heard by 11 a.m. each day, so that they may return home in time for their midday meal. Under the same programme, CHA, with the support of JWT Sri Lanka, has helped renovate, refurbish, fumigate and sanitize Juvenile Court premises and create a brighter and more child friendly atmosphere in and around the Court. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 25 Guest Speaker at a special operational meeting Meeting for database development In an attempt to improve reporting standards and to prevent misreporting on the sensitive subject of landmines, the LBAF, with support from Geneva Call held a seminar for the media on the subject of ‘Reporting on Landmine and Humanitarian Issues’, at the Sri Lanka Press Institute in July this year. CHA also joined hands with Young Asia TV to coordinate Media Workshops for Colombo and provincially based Journalists. ONGOING ENGAGEMENT IN POLICY FORUM CHA has continued its ongoing policy review activities through Partnerships in sectoral meetings, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) strategy coordination meetings, Steering Committee of the Needs Assessment of the Government of Sri Lanka, multilaterals, and other key stakeholders, weekly convener and rapport of protection, Inter Agency Steering Committee (IASC) meetings convened by the UN, Meetings convened by several Government bodies such as the Presidential Secretariat, the Ministry of Defense, the Ministry of Disaster Management and Human Rights etc. CHA/HRC WORKING GROUP ON DISASTER RELIEF MONITORING This working group is an initiative started by CHA at the request of the Disaster Relief Monitoring Unit (DRMU) of the Human Rights Commission (HRC). The objective of the group is to bring together the key players involved in tsunami relief activities to work collectively towards developing a people centered approach to monitor and report on inequities in the relief distribution process. SPECIAL OPERATIONAL MEETINGS Special operational meetings are convened in response to emerging crisis situations. In April, the focus was on heightened emergence of war and consequences with focuses on role of the Co-Chairs in reducing violence and promoting peace, International Humanitarian Law and protection of civilians during war in Sri Lanka, challenges in current environment for peace and development. The presenters were the US Ambassador in Sri Lanka, Head of Delegation of ICRC and the Executive Director of CHA. By June, the fall out of conflict and a growing impatience with our advocacy initiatives was noticed and we questioned our honesty and resolve. Efforts were made to focus on, Options for advocacy for humanitarian agencies and civil society, Reports and Analysis, Effective Advocacy through high level forums, CHA soft on human rights? The presenters were from CPA, CHA, OXFAM and the ED of CHA. 26 26 CHA Exhibition on Anti Corruption Information Seekers on Humanitarian Work EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT COMMITTEE ON DEVELOPMENT CHA, attended a Public Hearing held at the EU Parliament in Brussels on June 5, 2007 and addressed the issue of human rights and humanitarian space in current day Sri Lanka and provided an independent view from Sri Lanka. INTERNAL CCHA GROUP CHA has wide access to several options in configuring coordination, setting decision making structures for reviews and representation at all available advocacy points in Sri Lanka. Issues being sent from the Districts were framed and tabled by the advocacy unit. Issues tabled at the CCHA with feedback were highlighted at Operational Meetings and sent back to districts within one day of receipt. VOICES OF PEACE Considering the deteriorating security situation in war torn regions and decreasing humanitarian space in Sri Lanka, CHA offers any humanitarian organization, who wishes to express their views on peace and/or the current situation, monthly a space once every last Sunday. HEARING THE VOICE OF CHILDREN November 25, World Day for the Prevention of Child Abuse was celebrated by the Voice of Children (VoC) Team with a children’s event in which 40 children and 30 adults participated. The object was to raise awareness of the issue and help reduce the exposure of children to violence. The day featured a variety of creative team activity and video screenings followed by group discussion, analysis and a special Children’s Forum. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 27 Treasuring the Rights of Man Every Sri Lankan deserves a life of dignity and needs to be assured that it is possible to aspire for such a life in an environment which upholds and values people’s rights. This principle underlies CHA’s ongoing, unceasing efforts to bring human life in our country to centre stage. It is with this goal in view that it continues to expand its network of collaborators, building and strengthening support for people who constantly struggle for emancipation from a state of rightlessness. We have been successful in convening leaders of the humanitarian community, key stakeholders and empowering them to address critical humanitarian issues through intervention. This has helped us to work towards the promotion of equality and protection of human rights in many different parts of the country. 28 CHA During the year under review, we continued to work towards securing what we believe needs to be treasured the most, a universal, secular and comprehensive coverage of human rights. REPORTING ON VIOLATIONS OF RIGHTS The human-rights situation in Sri Lanka has been under much scrutiny in recent months. The increase in clashes in the North and East of the country has created a climate in which human-rights violations proliferate. This situation increasingly threatens the security of civilians, not only in the conflict-affected regions but all over the country. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 29 Field visit by Protection of Human Rights Mitigating & Impunity Paralegal aid and mobile legal clinics An effective method of protecting human rights is to inform and empower those who can make a direct positive impact towards the reduction of rights violations. Accurate and objective information is critical in this context. Thus, CHA provides special focus to work involving the monitoring and quantification of violations. The Human Rights Accountability Coalition (HRAC), established specifically for this purpose and operating independently, continued to systematically collect and report violations in the year 2007. Through the use of quantitative approaches and statistical methods, it equipped human rights NGOs with the tools needed to improve the accuracy and objectivity of their own reports. It also facilitated the pooling and sharing of human-rights violations data among member NGOs and others to ensure an objective statistical record of human rights violations. The project worked with donors and partner organizations to develop a web portal to link the network of organizations and further facilitate the reporting of human-rights violations. The objective was to allow accredited information providers to access the web portal from all parts of the country to post verified, credible information for analysis in the first instance. This base of information enables us to coordinate responses more efficiently in working with the relevant authorities, agencies and persons. In order to increase the accuracy and effectiveness of such reports, Human Rights Desk Officers were stationed at selected CHA District Offices to document human-rights violations and to take follow-up action with the support of other legal aid organizations. THE DAILY INCIDENT DATABASE The Daily Incidents Database was established in April 2007, adopted a process of systematically extracting reported human rights violations from selected news sources in the print media and the web. To further ensure the authenticity of the information that it disseminates, CHA releases it in an analysed form. Our Documentation Unit developed a process to categorize rights violations and types of incidents via the systematic analysis of data. It also incorporates information submitted by District Human Rights Desks. The CHA uses this information base to write to the responsible authorities concerned and draw their attention to violations that have been reported. The major focus of this project has been in areas reporting a high degree of violence. 30 30 CHA Community Protection Network members meeting in Trincomalee Community Protection Network activity in progress in the Southern Region This initiative was the result of a request for assistance by the Asia Foundation and FLICT, to identify new tools and documentation methodologies to document human rights violations and to provide an opportunity for other organizations to select and adopt the most suitable option into their organizational mandates. PROTECTING THE COMMUNITY As we seek to usher in development, an empowered community secure in the knowledge that their rights are protected remains a vital necessity. Just as an impoverished people constitute a weak nation, a strong people engenders a strong one. However, most communities need a helping hand. The Community Protection Network (CPN) established through CHA’s District Officers, consists of key institutions and individuals from district level organizations whose common goal is to work towards the promotion and protection of human rights and peace building. The CPN provides a strong forum to promote and protect rights while linking and strengthening existing community leadership and protection networks. It also enhances awareness of the humanitarian and human rights community protection mechanisms and needs of affected persons and facilitates the dissemination and coordination of information to relevant persons and organizations, identifying opportunities for timely action while also establishing a systematic review of action on information and follow-up. Co-ordination efforts of CHA’s CPN resulted in the appointment of three permanent doctors to the Kuchchavali Hospital, bringing relief to the people of Kuchchaveli who were facing immense problems due to the lack of permanent doctors and thus improving access to public health. A Public Servant Meeting was organized by Badulla CHA with the objective of improving community awareness on state public service institutions, the available services and how to approach them. Issues such as judicial procedures, the role of the Divisional secretariat and other institutions were explained. During the course of the year, the CPN took several initiatives to provide assistance to people in dire need. Among these initiatives was the strong campaign to collect signatures from the public to halt the killing of Nafeek Rizana, who was issued a death penalty in Saudi Arabia. More than ten thousand signatures were collected and handed over to the President’s office as a supporting document to be used during relief talks with Saudi Arabian authorities. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 31 Registration of Marriage Programme in progress at Batticaloa Mobile legal clinic in Kalutara CHA’s CPN in Batticaloa identified 100 couples in the Kinniyadi village who had not registered their marriage and conducted a late registration of marriage and delivered certificates. CHA’s CPN in Matara conducted a shramadana campaign in the Udawalawe National Park with the participation of Green Movement of Sri Lanka, Lanka Shakthi, Shadaham Mithuro and Human Resource Management Foundation. The people in Manthai West who were displaced to Periyamadhu due to heavy shelling were provided over 300 mosquitoe nets. The Musali Fisherman were among the IDPs who lost their equipment due to the recent displacement, which included boats and out motor engines. Through successful interventions by the CPN committee with the GA Mannar, Brigadier, and the Bishop, the fishermen recovered most of their equipment and were allowed to continue to fish in this area. Other issues addressed at CPN meetings during the course of the year have included the urgent needs of IDP’s, health issues, livelihood assistance, water supply, children’s issues, education and fisheries issues. In conflict affected districts, issues such as electricity, water and road rehabilitation facilities as well as problems in obtaining birth certificates and National Identification Cards were also discussed and redress sought. Further the CPN addressed public transport for students, payment requests for volunteer teachers, livelihood assistance for female headed families, as well as education assistance. PROVIDING LEGAL AID An important area of focus is ensuring the rights of people who having entered a system of rehabilitation and assistance, have been genuinely overlooked for whatever reason. We are here to ensure that those who need assistance the most have access to avenues that will provide it. Since 2006, CHA has been providing legal aid to those who need it, in the respective areas as part of assistance for protection. The skills and expertise we possess together with the linkages at our disposal, have given CHA a comparative advantage in providing holistic solutions. The low levels of legal literacy and the high cost of legal fees are the chief twin obstacles for victims in obtaining redress and many are not aware of the legal and administrative mechanisms in place to provide solutions to their problems. Taking this situation into consideration, CHA has provided legal and Paralegal programmes in its operational districts. In Southern districts, 22 mobile clinics were conducted in Galle, Matara, Kalutara and Hambantota to provide legal assistance to 750 persons through legal advice, documentation support, providing a link to obtain redress for the issues with other relevant legal and administrative authorities. Assistance was also provided through financial support, mediation support and filing cases in the District Court by the District Legal Officers. 32 32 CHA Paralegal Training Course in Ampara Legal Aid & Mobile documentation clinic in progress in Batticaloa Mobile clinics were conducted in the Northern and Eastern districts, commencing November 2007. Four free legal aid mobile clinics held in the Ampara, Batticaloa, Trincomalee and Vavuniya districts made it possible to provide legal assistance to 191 persons. Commencing from 2008 mobile clinics are scheduled to be held in all districts on a monthly basis, based on the previous year’s demand for full legal assistance among poor and vulnerable groups. We strengthened our services by recruiting 12 district based part time lawyers to provide the free legal assistance and to provide court appearance support for cases of maintenance, labour rights, human rights violations and fundamental rights. We have provided legal assistance to around 2,160 persons through the CHA district office part time legal officers. To strengthen our Paralegal programme, CPN and Paralegal volunteers in 12 districts have also been deployed. To meet legal aid needs, CHA conducted 11 Paralegal orientation training programmes for 440 Paralegal volunteers and community protection members in the North and East. The objective was to improve Paralegal services, build the capacities of those working within communities and to increase the effectiveness of receiving and documenting complaints for legal action. In another initiative conducted during the year under review, CHA in collaboration with the Brookings Institution/Berne Project which specializes in displacement, the Government of the Netherlands and the Sri Lankan Government continued to conduct mobile legal clinics for IDP’s and Returnees in nine districts in the North and East. These legal clinics were set-up to assist people to find solutions to pressing legal issues at the district level. The targeted needs included replacing legal documentation, land and property rights, gender based violence, loss of essential servitudes, abductions, child recruitment and child protection issues, unlawful detention and other human rights violations. RECOVERING IDENTITIES Tragic events, some natural and some the consequence of human action, have left thousands of people in many parts of the country without identity cards or other personal records. In late 2007, we helped the Government conduct several mobile documentation clinics in the Batticaloa District from which thousands benefited. Of 8,538 applications received for legal documentation such as a national identity card, birth or death certificate at these clinics, 4,079 have been forwarded for processing. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 33 Workshop on Regional programmes for Community Protection Network members Regional workshop on Rethinking Rights, Justice and Development - Southern District REGIONAL INITIATIVE FOR THE PROMOTION OF SUSTAINABLE LIVELIHOOD AND SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PARTICIPATION The opportunity to develop sustainable livelihoods with equal access to social and political participation is a prerequisite to ensuring the dignity of the human person. Such an environment allows the confidence of the community to grow and enables a Government to work towards eliminating poverty and plan, implement and achieve development goals. The objective of this Regional Initiative for the Right to Sustainable Livelihoods is to provide adequate safeguards and protection while also ensuring dignity and justice to marginalised people in the region. The programme was developed by a group of regional experts from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. The core policies and programmes of focus under this initiative are access to social and political participation and sustainable livelihood. A regional workshop on ‘Rethinking Rights, Justice and Development in Sri Lanka’ was held in the Tamil medium for participants from seven districts and in the Sinhala medium for participants in five districts, during the course of the year. The programme aimed at training and equipping representatives, human rights, peace and gender activists, academics, researchers and young professionals working at policy level with key concepts of human rights and justice. The training focussed specifically on marginalised communities linking them with developmental processes and popular development alternatives in order to build leadership capabilities for grassroots movements. It was also designed to sensitise participants from Government or civil society engaged in the formulation and implementation of policies, on the needs of special groups and to enhance understanding of the globalization process and enable participants to broaden their understanding, tolerance and thoughts of the developmental processes and systems and critically engage to discover alternative sustainable approaches to increase greater social and political participation of marginal communities across South Asia. A regional awareness programme was conducted for the Young Group in Matara which was established as a follow-up programme to the regional workshop. The workshop focuses on raising awareness and understanding on the concepts of Rights, Justice and Development. The key themes for the workshops are social and political participation and sustainable livelihoods. 34 CHA Capacity Building Programme on Environment Day Participants of the Norwegian Refugee Council Documentation Training CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMMES Empowering and strengthening individuals as well as institutions, is yet another means to safeguarding human rights. People and institutions armed with knowledge and skills, are better equipped to protect their own rights. Thus CHA focuses on improving the protection and development needs of communities in general and special groups in particular. CHA is the first non-profit organization to possess a quality certification for products and services in the form of an ISO certification. This has encouraged it to continuously reach for higher standards in all capacity building activities. Through the capacity building programme, CHA strives to improve the protection and development needs of vulnerable groups such as women, children, ex-detainees and families of persons who have disappeared in the conflict affected districts. During the course of the year, CHA conducted capacity building programmes to promote and protect human rights. These programmes covered issues such as HIV/AIDS, Peace and Reconciliation, Psychosocial and Counselling, Environment and Conflict Management. HUMAN RIGHTS - OTHER ACTIVITIES The Documentation team of the Human Rights Unit completed a training programme on data analysis and database designing using SPSS and EpiInfo software for 15 staff members of World Vision Lanka. Workshops conducted in Batticaloa provided basic knowledge on the SAARC Charter and its influence on the social work of humanitarian agencies in Sri Lanka. CHA Colombo also sponsored the SAARC Charter dissemination at a three-day workshop, to four CPN members and the District Officer of Vavuniya. T he Documentation Unit also undertook to design a database which would gather data from the survey carried out for the RESIST. The HRAC team completed coding data entry of approximately 450 articles on human rights violations from the ‘Divaina’ newspaper. The Documentation Unit has developed a proposal to monitor current human rights action and take necessary steps to assist victims of human rights violations through partner organizations. Community protection efforts led to the funding of a Youth Sports Festival in Hambantota, a health clinic for persons over 40 in the Kalutara District and cadjans were provided for the houses of 37 poverty stricken families in the Vavuniya District. The Community Protection Network (CPN) together with the Ministry of Social Service and Social Welfare distributed 500 spectacles to persons selected by CPN member organizations, in the Galle District. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 35 Putting Information where it is needed the most Knowledge holds the keys to many doors, doors which may otherwise remain closed. At CHA, we know that knowledge is power and that is why we are committed to keeping information fed through our network to reach all our collaborators. Providing information to those involved and interested in humanitarian work is one of CHA’s most important functions. We know that people and organizations both at local and international level depend on us to get a clear and in depth picture of what the basic figures actually represent. Those in the field need more details about the people whose lives they touch every day, in order to carry out their functions effectively. Donors must know why they are funding the projects they do and how the money they provide help communities in need. Other key stakeholders such as national and international government agencies, academic institutions, scholars, bilateral and multi-lateral agencies and think tanks depend on our input so that they may draw up plans and policies that will 36 CHA improve the way the humanitarian sector works and make life better for conflict and disaster affected people and others in general. This means constantly stimulating the development and enhancement of information networks and providing customized information to members as and when required. LINKING SRI LANKA TO THE WORLD The world is becoming a smaller and more compact place. The boom in information sharing, fuelled by the technology of the day has brought more issues into more living rooms across more of the world’s citizens than at any time in the past. Thus, it is information that is the common glue that keeps us all linked together and growing stronger. CHA is aware of the need to reach international standards in order to keep pace with the rest of the world. Sometimes we achieve this through sharing information; at other times by stimulating and developing knowledge networks. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 37 Meeting on Information Management Systems (IMS) at the Trincomalee District Resource Centre Meeting on IMS for District Officers The eTwinning is an international development exchange tool that uses the power of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in schools for field and language learning. It simplifies education methods and enables inter-cultural dialogue, ICT use and student productivity in the electronic media. Two Sri Lankan and French schools were twinned under this programme. Collège Jeanne d’Arc in Tarbes, France was paired with Ilma College in Matara and Collège Jean Jaurés in Monbourget, France was paired with Vijitha Central College in Dickwella. The four schools have established an effective dialogue and information sharing process through the web. CHA’s team provided training, advice and technical support to the two local schools to carry out an effective information exchange. DATA ON THE VIRTUAL PLANE Maintaining transparency in the work that we do is important because we work with a variety of different partners both at local and international level. This involves providing fast and easy access to information about what we do, literally at the click of a button. This is why information about some of the major areas of CHA's work has been facilitated through special and focussed websites. The network and the website for the Civil Society Network of Information Sharing www.csnis.lk, was launched at the Sri Lanka Foundation Institute (SLFI) during the course of this year. The CSNIS was set up with the aim of sharing publications and dissemination of current, accurate and relevant information with others in the field. This was a collaborative effort of the CHA, the Berghof Foundation for Conflict Studies, Centre for Poverty Analysis (CEPA), National Peace Council (NPC), Save the Children in Sri Lanka (SCiSL) and Social Scientists’ Association (SSA). The Knowledge Management Centre hosted its second in-house website, the LBAF website, www.banlandmines.lk. The web hosting service was initiated by eTeam. The eTeam also hosts and maintains the CHA-JICA website www.ngojica-sl.org. INFORMATION AS A RIGHT The right to information is fast becoming a part of mainstream human rights. This is recognition of the important role that information plays in every aspect of life and in every area of work. A special bi-monthly tabloid that highlights issues from the districts was launched in January. ‘Groundview’, promises to be a purveyor of vox populi for peace. It attempts to go beyond the news, and fills a long felt need for a mainstream information mechanism that promotes collective representation and people’s aspirations especially from the districts and provinces. ‘Groundview’ is expected to act as a catalyst in strengthening civil society’s objection to violence whilst building new values, thinking and action in all districts of Sri Lanka. The tabloid attempts to nurture a collective voice for hope and ultimate peace and highlights the underlying sources of conflict as a preventive measure. 38 38 CHA District Resource Centre at Galle eTwinning of Ilma College in Matara The Colombo Knowledge Centre established by CHA in 1997, initiated the sharing of publications, on the humanitarian sector, this year. Publications of Jathika Saviya Authority, Directory of Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO), ‘Groundview’ and the Resource Pack published by the International Development Research Centre have been among the publications distributed. There has been a positive response to the initiative and requests have been received to continue the scheme. In our area of work, being constantly updated on new happenings is critical to good performance. The Information Alert of CHA’s Colombo Knowledge Centre (CKC) highlights current events related to the humanitarian sector and is circulate to two thousand recipients on a daily basis. Around 25 sources are utilized to compile the Alert. Stakeholders are informed of new additions to the collection of literature on disaster management and other issues on a weekly basis through the CKC Alert. FEEDING THE NETWORK Facilitating accurate and timely information is an imperative, especially when so many district offices depend on information from CHA to determine their future activities. CHA takes various initiatives to ensure that those at the receiving end not only obtain the relevant information but also know how to use it. CHA has a network of well equipped District Resource Centres (DRC) which house a wide collection of books on Workers’ Rights, Labour Laws and numerous other subjects. These serve as a valuable resource to personnel at the DRCs. During the course of the year, a DRC workshop was conducted for Information Assistants of the DRCs in Ampara, Badulla, Hambantota, Matara, Puttalam and Colombo to promote activities of the District Offices to other I/NGOs and to monitor the transparency and accountability of the work done by the Information Assistants. It also sought to increase the number of Sinhala and English books in the library and maintain a register for visitors and all users who seek information from the DRC. A pilot project to promote district based youth volunteerism in the Hambantota District was commenced by the eTeam in January 2007, while projects were also carried out in other districts. OUR YOUTH VOLUNTEER PROJECT CHA’s Youth Volunteer Project aims to help unemployed young people with training and funds to start sustainable information and communication - technology-related businesses that will also directly benefit their own neighbourhoods and communities. Two such young women from the Hambantota, Nilakshi Udayanthi and Tekla Lakshmi, were selected to receive financial assistance for four months together also training and guidance to carry out a community audit and to formulate a business plan. Nilakshi produced a comprehensive business plan to set up an ICT Training Centre, whilst Tekla worked on setting up an ICT-enabled agricultural information centre. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 39 Providing Pathways… from Problem to Solution The road to peace holds many a challenge. Whilst it is necessary to physically remove the more tangible obstructions, the more challenging task is changing the way people think. This is a critical factor in advancing on the path to peace because after all, wars are made in the minds of men. We are aware of the needs of those directly affected by war, who constitute a major component of displaced people, mainly in the North and East of Sri Lanka. Additionally, the country still grapples with the challenge of looking into the needs of a another group; the victims of the tsunami of 2004. At present Sri Lanka’s displaced population totals over half a million people. The needs of these people range from food, shelter and clothing to more complex issues such as insecurity, lack of employment, inadequate access to local health, education services and alcohol abuse. Their needs go beyond basic 40 CHA material requirements and include psychosocial support because their circumstances are not those of the average person. For, these are a group of people who have had to deal with death, separation, displacement and loss of all kinds, often, against a backdrop of violence. PEACE-BUILDING AND CONFLICT SENSITIVITY Humanitarian assistance is no doubt a critical need in Sri Lanka. But, in order for such assistance to touch people in the way it is meant to and reach its ultimate objective, assistance must be provided in an effective and safe manner. This means equipping key people with critical skills to ensure that the time, energy and money utilized in this endeavour do not go to waste and instead, help us achieve our goals in this vital area. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 41 Peace Initiative Programme at the Matara Youth Camp CHA - RedR Training Programme CHA continues to refine its approach in rendering humanitarian assistance and development co-operation initiatives in a manner that recognizes the need for heightened sensitivity in terms of an environment of conflict. Our efforts are aimed at increasing the capacity of humanitarian and development agencies and their partners, as well as Government institutions, to plan and implement projects effectively and safely and thereby minimize negative impacts. This, we believe will enable humanitarian and development participants to focus on their primary activities, thereby helping to improve the lives of people. During the year under review, CHA continued to strengthen its capacities to meet the need for effective and safe humanitarian assistance and development co-operation, within the initiative to mainstream conflict sensitivity in the humanitarian and development sector in Sri Lanka. The current programme runs for a period of three years (2007-2009). As an integral component, CHA will provide assessments, training, advisory support and standard development services for implementing agencies and their partners in all three language media - Sinhala, Tamil and English. The project also serves to expand consultancy and training skills of CHA staff and associated consultants/ trainers to enable them to provide better services to agencies. The programme is working with other members of the Peace Programme to put together peace initiatives from CHA. In times of war, hearts and minds tend to become polarized and intractable. Entrenched ideology influenced by conflict, clouds otherwise rational and humanitarian thought. It is in such a context that conflict sensitivity is required the most. In order to introduce conflict sensitivity (CS) into the work we do, a certain amount of will and commitment is necessary on our part and from our partners. We endeavoured to achieve this, during the course of the year. CHA’s Peace-building and CSA Programme provided an ideal medium for the initiatives of several development partner agencies. Several workshops were conducted during the year in review. Conflict Sensitivity, a systematic analysis for CS, Methodological Frameworks and PCIA and Do No Harm approaches were introduced to the participants as key features, in an effort to provide a better understanding of the subject. The programme was assisted by a placement from CIM - Centre for Internal Migration and Transmission. A framework was prepared to link CHA Trainers and Consultants with other Humanitarian Development Agencies. The CHA network is being used to prepare a framework to carry out CS activities effectively through other agencies in the North and East. 42 CHA Distance Learning Certificate Course Awards Ceremony Capacity Building Programme Phase II in Badulla THE DISTANCE LEARNING CERTIFICATE COURSE ON CONFLICT TRANSFORMATION AND PEACE-BUILDING The Distance Learning Certificate Course on Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding is one of the main components of the peacebuilding project. The course has been structured to provide young peacebuilding actors an opportunity to learn about peacebuilding and related subjects at a theoretical and practical level. The course meets the existing need for peace education in the country and bridges the gap created by the lack of opportunity to learn the subjects in the Sinhala and Tamil languages. The Distance Learning Certificate Course on Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding was begun in all regions. The Centre for the Protection and Promotion of Human Rights was selected as the partner organization to co-ordinate the course in the Eastern Province. This organization co-ordinated activities in the Trincomalee, Ampara and Batticaloa Districts. The workshops provided participants an opportunity to share knowledge and meet other people working in the same field. A total of 52 students completed the certificate course in Peacebuilding and Conflict Transformation successfully. THE CREATORS’ FORUM WORKSHOP The Creators’ Forum Workshop provided an opportunity for sharing the experiences of partners and to introduce a tool to evaluate and assess the activities of partner organisations, to discuss and finalize modules developed for Community Transformation Facilitators (CTF) and to finalise the selection criteria of the CTF. The Creators’ Forum trained 75 persons as CTFs on learning, peacebuilding, social transformation, women and gender, working at the grass roots level. The workshop brought together professionals who work on conflict sensitivity and peace issues in the context of humanitarian assistance and development co-operation in NGOs, Government organizations and Government institutions. As many as 66 participants attended the workshops where co-operation and linkages between agencies and people working in the field of Conflict Sensitivity were developed. PUTTING PEACE INTO PRACTICE Committed residents of the Anuradhapura, Polonnaruwa and Puttalam Districts, representing a diversity of cultures and religious beliefs, come together to practise what they have learnt as students of CHA’s Distance Learning Certificate Course in Conflict Transformation and Peace Building. One outcome of this cooperation: a house in Anuradhapura for an elderly lady, formerly destitute and homeless. In such ways, step by step, we make ready for the peace that must one day come. Mental Healthcare Programme Participants at the Psychososial Forum PROVIDING PEACE OF MIND A conflict situation leaves behind both physical and emotional damage. The right resources can and will repair the more tangible forms of damage. However, the emotional trauma that conflict leaves in its wake is more complex and requires careful handling. This is where CHA’s psychosocial initiatives take the lead, giving those working in the humanitarian sector a broader understanding of the people they are dealing with and the problems they face. The Psychosocial Forum (PSF) aims to enhance the quality, competence and accountability of psychosocial work in connection to individuals, organizations and institutions against the backdrop of a conflict situation. Its ultimate objective is to enhance psychosocial well-being within Sri Lanka. The forum takes a special interest in issues related to affected women and children. During the year under review, workshops were conducted in a variety of districts to give participants an opportunity to learn the theoretical concepts of the subject. These included workshops on stress management conducted in Anuradhapura, Dikwella and Colombo. Other workshops included ‘Working with Families and Children’ and ‘Managing Abused Children’ in Colombo and Hambantota. A workshop on relaxation and self-esteem and on ‘Trauma and Mourning’ was conducted in February. The latter was co-ordinated with Samuthana as a CHA-Samuthana collaborative initiative. Workshops were also organized to field test the International IASC Guidance on Mental Health and Psychosocial Response in Emergencies. A presentation on ‘Best Practices Guidelines on Psychosocial Work in Sri Lanka’ was prepared as an introduction to the IASC Workshop. The Psychosocial Forum prepared and sent the report on the draft Mental Health Act to the Directorate of Mental Health in August. PROTECTION FOR INTERNALLY DISPLACED PERSONS (IDPs) More than two-thirds of the three million internally-displaced people in the Asian continent are concentrated in South Asia, where human rights abuses have caused widespread displacement. In Sri Lanka’s generation-long conflict, every offensive has increased the number of displaced people. Many of them have been living in welfare centres for over twenty years. Most have no hope of returning home in the foreseeable future. A generation born and raised in displacement now exists, knowing no other way of life. Forced to live away from their original homes for years and even decades, the status of Sri Lanka’s IDPs is precarious. Even the minority lucky enough to be resettled in new homes still require considerable assistance. Those living in IDP welfare centres face enormous deficits in health and education as well as numerous social problems (which will be highlighted in another section of this study). IDPs often continue to suffer 44 44 CHA The Vavuniya Sithamparan Pre-school children receive a packet of milk and buns Alayadivembu IDP camp in Ampara - identified for the housing programme human rights violations and threats to life. Their access to food is often limited. Still more limited is access to employment, education and health care. Living amid conflict in remote areas where access by humanitarian organizations is difficult, these people are not easily reached by those who wish to help them. The difficulties faced by Sri Lanka’s IDPs have numerous causes. Tragically, many originate in or are exacerbated by official policies and practices (or the lack of them) in respect of human rights and development. Worse yet, human life itself has been devalued in the conflict. The lack of respect for and appreciation of human rights in Sri Lanka today is both shameful and alarming. RESTORING DIGNITY TO PEOPLE AFFECTED BY CONFLICT This initiative is a response to issues of human safety, welfare and dignity raised by conflict and poverty. The focus is on emergency humanitarian intervention for people affected by conflict in eight northern and eastern districts and Puttalam targeting a minimum of 15,000 families whom it endeavours to resettle and rehabilitate in safety and dignity. Needs addressed by the programme include immediate relief, housing, water and sanitation, documentation, livelihood support and educational materials. It also aims to provide adequate safeguards and protection to preserve the dignity of, and see justice done by, families affected and marginalized by conflict. Special categories of internally displaced persons such as children, especially unaccompanied minors, expectant mothers, mothers with young children, female heads of households, persons with disabilities and elderly persons are also a special focus. Response under this project is twofold, one being directly implemented by the CHA rehabilitation team and the other undertaken in collaboration with local CBOs and NGOs in relevant districts. Illustrating how we set about implementation of work, a call for proposals was advertised in the local media. Thirteen organizations were selected to implement programmes in the areas of health, education, livelihood and housing. These programmes are closely monitored by CHA’s Head Office and district staff. HELPING TO RE-BUILD AFTER THE TSUNAMI Mr. Nirosh Thenuka’s small shoemaking business was destroyed by the 2004 tsunami. With a grant of Rs. 30,000 from CHA, he was able to buy new equipment and re-start the business. This busy young father not only provides for his family but also provides employment for five others through his business. His current income is around 40,000 a month; on our last visit, he proudly announced that he had put down a deposit on a small delivery truck. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 45 IDP Assistance Programme for GCE O/L students in Batticaloa Distribution of vegetables under the IDP Assistance Programme CHA held discussions throughout the Northern and Eastern Districts with all Government Agents and District Secretaries to clarify the situation in regard to IDPs and to facilitate collaboration in addressing issues. Further discussions were held with the Co-ordinator for NGOs in the welfare camps. In many areas our assistance was channelled through villages/camps and communities, whilst in Killinochchi and Mullaitivu, assistance was facilitated by the Government Agents of the respective districts. CHA also identified areas that required assistance, based on discussions and sites visited. Several communities who required assistance were identified. In Rahmath Nagar, around 350 families, most of who were displaced from Mannar ten years ago faced problems such as unemployment, lack of sanitation and drinking water facilities. In Hijarathpuram, home to 181 families, a majority were displaced from Jaffna in the early 1990s. Ninety-nine families were selected to receive shelter under the World Bank Project. In the Batticaloa District 198 families from Paddipalai, Vellavelai and Vavunaithivu were identified for assistance. Based on their interest and working capacity to expand their livelihood, 20 beneficiaries were selected to follow a rice based food production training programme conducted by Cathy Rich Memorial Food Processing Training Centre. Required assistance included the provision of relief items to people of Avaranthulawa and recently displaced persons in Vavuniya, the repairing of fifty houses, provision of educational support to 3,000 students, provision of livelihood assistance to 200 beneficiaries to name a few. Replacement of lost legal documentation was deemed a crucial need of those affected by conflict. Documentation clinics were conducted targeting over 500 displaced persons per clinic. These clinics were held in collaboration with GSs, DSs, Registrars, Lawyers and other relevant Government officials. The Ministry of Constitutional Affairs and National Integration in collaboration with the Ministry of Public Administration and Home Affairs initiated a mobile service for the people in Batticaloa District, including IDPs and returnees. The mobile service was initiated under the 180-day ‘Negenahira Navodaya’ programme and clinics were conducted in 11 District Secretariat Divisions in Batticaloa. ASSISTING INTERNALLY DISPLACED PERSONS (IDPS) OF THE MANNAR, BATTICALOA, AMPARA, TRINCOMALEE AND VAVUNIYA DISTRICTS This initiative operates within the scope of the health sector and seeks to provide adequate safeguards and protection, whilst affording dignity and justice to families affected and marginalized by conflict. We were able to assist 1,000 families with nutritious food whilst redressing some of their health concerns through the provision of mosquito nets and insect repellents. Health camps were also conducted and water supply and sanitation levels were enhanced at camp sites. 46 46 CHA Health camp held in Puttalam Product Display - Small Grants Programme By the end of a 3-month grant duration 1,078 children and 938 families were recipients of nutritious food; health camps were conducted for 575 IDPs and clean water, through a programme of purification of wells reached 652 beneficiaries. BUILDING BACK BETTER Sri Lanka is still grappling with the destruction that the tsunami of December 2004 left in its wake. CHA understands that post-tsunami reconstruction is not merely about reconstructing buildings, roads and other economic infrastructure, but extends to rebuilding communities, community life and livelihoods. To make this a success, those affected communities must play an active role in the process of rebuilding lives. Several programmes including livelihood development programmes were structured to meet this requirement. SECTOR SPECIFIC DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES The programme aims to achieve sustainable livelihoods for investors (we foster the idea of people as ‘investors’ and not ‘beneficiaries’) and to encourage other actors and interested organizations to centre stage people for a life of dignity through engaging in a viable livelihood. Some of the specific objectives we hope to achieve are to be able to improve incomes of ‘investors’ via introduction and development of lucrative livelihood options, facilitate marketing of products/service generated by beneficiaries, empower communities through training and development projects and offer avenues of experience and information sharing. These initiatives are further strengthened through the formation of two district level advisory committees fully equipped with the expertise and organisational representation necessary to drive the process. Broadly speaking, we have identified two categories – rice based products and mushroom cultivation – within which opportunities for lucrative livelihoods lie for target communities. In terms of rice based products, we expect to establish a dedicated Production and Sales Centre in Tangalle to facilitate the project. As regards mushroom cultivation, around 60 beneficiaries are currently in the process of establishing a common brand for their products, in order to enter the mass scale market. ASSISTING WOMEN IN NEED Twenty tsunami-affected women in the Matara district were trained in mushroom cultivation using funds from the Diakonia Livelihood grant. Afterwards, they met with us every month at the district office to share their experiences, problems and progress. success and marketing. Given their enthusiasm and initial successes, CHA opted to assist them further out of our JDC grant, enabling them to market their products under a common brand name at our sales outlets establish in the district. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 47 The pottery training centre in Batticaloa Exhibition of the Post-Tsunami Recovery Programme in Kalutara HEALTH AND LIVELIHOOD GRANT PROGRAMME This programme assisted tsunami-affected communities in the districts of Batticaloa, Ampara, Matara, Galle and Kalutara. Its objectives were to improve the livelihoods and health of affected persons and their families and to strengthen the capacity of partner organizations. The programme was implemented through carefully-selected community organizations and NGOs in these districts, working in collaboration with beneficiaries. They were executed in project cycles of three to five months. Over a ten-month period, over 7,500 families and 8,000 children were assisted. PROMOTION OF LIVELIHOOD This programme focuses on the provision of a sustainable livelihood as being a critical component of recovery from natural disasters. CHA’s work focussed on small scale entrepreneurs, skilled labour and others who may not have received the assistance they needed to rebuild their lives and enjoy a viable household livelihood. We built on existing skills whilst developing new and existing livelihood pursuits within the home or the work place. Thus we focussed our attention and efforts on assisting people in vulnerable communities to set up shops, home gardens, small scale food processing ventures, brick making, carpentry, tailoring ventures, embroidering ventures, ornamental fish enterprises as well as spice, poultry farming and jewellery enterprises, to name a few. The direct assistance programme targeted the districts of Ampara, Batticaloa, Hambantota, Matara, Galle, Kalutara, Trincomalee and Colombo. Across all these districts, CHA was able to assist 420 beneficiaries to start up or improve some means of livelihood. Within the overall project, CHA prioritized ‘Women Headed Households’ in offering established and non-traditional means of livelihood. Our projects and assistance initiatives took into account the fact that women tended to be restricted to operating within or around the home, due to prevailing cultural norms and influences. A group of 25 tsunami affected women from the Hambantota District were selected for a training programme on ‘Bites and Yoghurt Making’ and another group was provided a training on tailoring. In addition a training programme was conducted on mushroom cultivation with expert knowledge from the University of Ruhunu and RADA. Arrangements were also made to facilitate training through the ILO on ‘Start and Improve Your Business’ (SYB) programme, in Hambantota, Galle, Matara and Kalutara. Nine beneficiaries in Batticaloa received livelihood assistance in the form of grants. Beneficiaries in Matara received livelihood equipment after participating in the SYB training conducted by CHA. In a measure to monitor the utilization of resources, they were also requested to submit a business plan on how they 48 48 CHA A thriving field of vegetables Assisting paddy farmers in the Batticaloa District hope to utilize assistance provided to enhance their capacity and income. A SYB training programme was also conducted in the Hambantota District to provide an opportunity for tsunami affected people to enhance their knowledge. CHA and its agencies visited over 45 beneficiaries in eight GN Divisions in Trincomalee and found that the beneficiaries had utilized the assistance they received to engage in a range of livelihoods including small businesses, goat rearing and home gardening. CHA also identified 25 beneficiaries, involved mainly in running eateries in Veloore, Poonochchimunai and Ariampathy in the Batticaloa District. Trade Fairs were organized by the District Secretariat, Galle with assistance from humanitarian organizations operating in the district. These included an NGO exhibition, trade fair for the tsunami affected, children’s programme to uplift the psychosocial aspect of children, legal aid camp and health mobile clinic. A group of women engaged in agriculture, were identified from Batticaloa and will be provided with assistance to promote their livelihood. The assistance package will include fencing the land, provision of quality seeds, irrigation facilities and awareness on best practices. The beneficiaries in four to five groups will engage collectively in farming activities. In addition, the final selection and verification was carried out in the Adampodai village in Trincomalee. Flood victims in the Tissamaharama Divisional Secretariat, in the Hambantota District were provided non-food items such as fuel generators, stationery, rubber hoses and toothpaste. PROMOTION OF LIVELIHOOD FOR TSUNAMI AFFECTED OF AMPARA This programme was initiated in response to the needs of communities who were affected by the tsunami and the conflict in the North and East of the country. Four communities engaged in different skilled professions and agriculture were identified to receive assistance. The beneficiaries were involved in jewellery making, wood working and carpentry, laundry, crops and vegetable cultivation which had been the primary sources of income sustaining their lives. The loss or damage to tools and equipment and in the case of farmers, the loss of fertile soil owing to the tsunami had resulted in immense hardship. At the time of completing the programme, within the time limit of 6 months of receiving assistance an average improvement in income of 15% was noted. A PERSONAL TESTIMONY ‘My name is Sellan Thiyakaraja and I am a launderer. In the 2004 tsunami, I lost my iron box, bicycle and other equipment when my remote coastal village, Karaitivu, was destroyed by the surging waves. It was a terrible time, but later, with the help of CHA’s Livelihood Restoration Project, I was able to obtain all the tools and skills I need to continue my business. Now I am the Treasurer of the Karaitivu Launderers’ Association (created by CHA) and run my own laundry very successfully. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 49 HSRP – Operational Meeting A livelihood working group Farmers were given assistance to replace salt contaminated soil with fertile soil as well as to replace lost or damaged farming equipment. Sites containing fertile soil have been identified and efforts were taken to enrich farming lands. A total of 197 beneficiaries received assistance to restart or enhance their livelihood activities which range from rice pounding, mat weaving, agriculture, pottery, running small grocery shops, jewellery making and food processing amongst others. HUMAN SECURITY RESPONSE PROGRAMME (HSRP) It is likely that with adequate resources we could address the tangible needs and deprivations of the afflicted. But how does one provide a climate of security for them? It is a complex issue, with many influencing factors some of which lie beyond the general ‘line of duty’ of many institutions. Even so, promoting human security constitutes a big part of what CHA does every day. Working with people to improve their living conditions and to ensure human security is a major challenge for the humanitarian sector. Encouraging and strengthening partnerships among all sectors and across all levels is central to achieving success in this endeavour through synergized efforts. The activities of HSRP fall within all of CHA’s core programme areas. One of the main objectives of the programme is to ensure human security by affording the opportunity of humanitarian assistance to each and every Sri Lankan in need of such assistance – whether they be those affected by natural and man-made disasters, or vulnerable groups whose concerns need to be articulated and brought into focus, such as the physically disabled and the mentally fatigued whose rights to a life of dignity are violated. The HSRP activities are diverse in their reach and are active through different channels, serving to promote and encourage co-ordinated efforts and increased networking/partnerships amongst the humanitarian community, in order to strengthen the overall humanitarian imperative to respond to needs and issues. Through the HSRP activities, advocacy issues are highlighted and CHA proceeds to take these to the appropriate levels and to engage and lobby relevant agencies and parties. With well-established information sources and centres located at each of its 13 branches spread all over the island, CHA disseminates information through different media, targeting individuals from the grassroots level upwards, supporting the right to information and stressing the importance of accountability at all levels through access to information. The mainstreaming of quality standards ensures and promotes humanitarian activities to be accountable and professional. One such area HSRP focussed on in 2007 was the resettlement programme in the East. Regular updates of latest developments were briefed to agencies through the weekly operational meetings held in Colombo, as well as through district based co-ordination meetings. In response to a request that emanated from these meetings, a focussed meeting was held in March attended by over 40 representatives of agencies that were willing to assist in resettlement in Vakarai. Here, certain concerns regarding the resettlement process were highlighted and submitted collectively at high level meetings convened by Government Ministries. Subsequently, issues mentioned in the submission such as the 50 50 CHA Bio-farming Project - Seminar on the Environment Preparations under way to plant a nursery establishment of District Committees and Civil Military Liaison mechanisms to monitor rehabilitation activities, establishment of a Police Station in the area, etc. were resolved, and a number of agencies began to assist IDPs in Vakarai, and continue to do so. This working relationship formed between the Government and the humanitarian sector extended to the establishment of the Consultative Committee on Humanitarian Assistance (CCHA), convened by the Ministry of Disaster Management and Human Rights, as well as its five sub-committees, through which both sectors continued to meet, discuss and resolve operational issues. CHA represents the NGO sector at these meetings, and uses the HSRP activities as a channel for information between the different parties concerned. One significant issue that was resolved through the CCHA mechanism concerns the transportation of construction material into the Vanni. Procedures to be followed were briefed at a meeting convened by HSRP in October, and CHA intervention was promised if agencies adhered to these. Following this meeting certain agencies that sent in their documents were given permission to transport building material into the region after months of not having had this facility. Arrangements were also made for NGOs to work with the Mullaitivu GA on this issue where the GA would personally supervise the use of such material transported. PROMOTE VOLUNTEERISM The funds under this programme are made available for volunteer and community based organizations carrying out social service projects in districts. The following are a few examples carried out under Promote Volunteerism this month: Rs. 15,000 provided to Organization for Peace and Education Development, Puttlam to conduct Programme on Women’s Rights. Rs. 4,500 given to Kalutara Diriya Kantha Piyasa to purchase gifts for elderly women at Women’s Day programme. Rs. 82,500 provided to Centre for Peace and Reconciliation to meet fees of resource persons to conduct Human Rights Diploma in Jaffna. Awaiting documentation to release payment. MITIGATING AND RECOVERING FROM DISASTERS Preparation is the key word where disasters are concerned. And the first step towards preparation involves being equipped with accurate information. CHA has first-hand experience in dealing with people affected by conflict and disaster. Our work with the tsunami affected has given us ample opportunity to assess and understand requirements that arise in such a situation. PROMOTING HUMAN SECURITY CHA has helped create an essential link between the public and relevant authorities through its Human Security Response Programme. Among the beneficiaries of the programme was 25-year-old Radhakrishnan Jeyaraj of Batticaloa. Arriving in Colombo on an errand for his family, he was immediately arrested near the Pettah bus stand, detained for eight days and transferred to Boossa Camp thereafter. Fortunately, the CHA Human Rights Desk officer advanced his distraught mother funds to travel to Colombo and advice on how to present her case to the Institute of Human Rights. As a result of this intervention, Jeyaraj was released. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 51 An anti-corruption exhibition in progress Exhibition at World Social Forum Day CHA’s Environment Disaster Management Programme (EDMP) aims to actively involve the community in long-term environmental sustainability and natural hazards management and mitigation in order to prevent natural hazards from escalating into disasters. EDMP’s primary goal is the promotion of ecological practices, education, and empowerment of people to be ecologically sensitive and active to take a practical hands-on approach to regeneration of natural ecosystems. During the year under review, the EDMP organized a series of programmes on ‘natural disasters’ with school children as the main target. A pilot workshop on natural disasters was conducted for over one hundred and fifty students of the Kalutara Maha Vidyalaya in February with resource persons from the Centre for Climate Change Studies (CCCS) and National Building Research Organisation (NBRO). CHA also brought focus to the problems caused by landslides and measures on minimizing such natural disasters in two presentations made at the monthly Environmental Forum at CHA Colombo. The EDMP team has broadened its scope to general environmental issues that the country is facing and expects to disseminate information to those in need through awareness and advocacy. Project work on the rehabilitation of abandoned small scale paddy lands in Ambalantota DS division and coastal belt planting along the coastal area from Pallikudawa to Medilla in the Hambantota District was completed. The Environmental Forum focussed on water related issues to coincide ‘World Water Day’, in March. Three presentations were made at the Forum providing further information about environment issues. A Professsor from the University of Sri Jayawardenapura delivered a presentation titled ‘Is water crisis a fact or myth?’ The Environmental Foundation made a presentation on the National Environmental Act. One of the main points at the presentation was the fact that anyone releasing waste into the environment without a license could face a threat of litigation. To mitigate disaster and drought, ‘Rainwater Harvesting System’, a practical appliance that takes water out of a hydrological cycle was introduced. PROVIDING PATHWAYS FROM PROBLEM TO SOLUTION - OTHER ACTIVITIES CHA exhibited publications on transparency and accountability in Sinhala, Tamil and English at its stall at the ‘Anti-Corruption Exhibition’, which was held at the BMICH from July 27-29. Needs Assessments - District Offices were allocated Rs. 12,000 per month for the purpose of conducting needs assessments. Each district identified and listed out specific and urgent needs of their areas. Sectors/areas listed by them, or by organizations or groups who might conduct such assessments. District Operational Meetings were held in Kalutara, Batticaloa, Trincomalee, Hambantota, Galle and Ampara. A Radio Programme in Sinhala and Tamil was recorded and broadcast on subjects such as, an Introduction to Human Rights and its Effects in Development, the Human Rights Commission and its Activities and How People can Access these services, Child Rights, IDP issues in Batticaloa, Human Rights issues, Children’s issues at IDP camps, CHA Livelihood Assistance and publications available at CHA Resource Centres. Plans are underway for a live programme where people’s queries will be answered. 52 CHA A meeting in Hambantota to assess the needs of people affected by the tsunami Promoting organic farming in Matara A training programme on ‘Competency Based Economies through Formation of Enterprise’ was conducted in collaboration with Sewa Lanka Foundation and the CHA District Office in Galle. The objective was to upgrade the livelihood of tsunami affected persons in Ahangama and Hikkaduwa. A training programme on ‘Improve your Business’ was conducted in Matara with the participation of 25 participants. Beneficiaries were provided with livelihood assistance and training was provided on marketing, business planning, stock taking and budgeting. The Human Rights Commission (HRC) was contacted to propose the conduct of a Human Rights Forum to focus on issues such as rights for the disabled, as well as children’s and women’s rights. CHA District Office in Kalutara organized a Pandanus planting programme along the coastal belt adjoining the Payagala Fisheries Community Centre. The Environmental Forum held in June included presentations on ‘What is Being Done with the Municipalities Collected Waste?’, ‘Introduction to Some Issues for the Forum’s Consideration’ and a discussion and follow-up to previous meetings in Waste Reduction. Forest Garden Nature Organisation (FGNO) conducted a field visit on the 4th of June to Bolgoda to assess the proposed project ‘Restoration of Swamp and Mangrove Vegetation of Panadura-Bolgoda Wetland’. CHA District Office in Galle in collaboration with 4th year students of the Factulty of Medicine of the University of Ruhuna conducted an awareness campaign on ‘Selected Suburban/Rural Communities and the Environment’. Two groups represented the EDMP-CHA at the Shramadana campaign, an attempt to Eliminate ‘Lantana’: Invasive Plant Species in Udawalawe National Park. This was a national level programme which required environment groups to volunteer to work with the Department of Wildlife Conservation. Neo Synthesis Research centre did a second presentation on restoring the ecological community and how the restoration improves the quality of life. The restoration project comes under ‘Green Coast’ of IUCN which is being monitored by CHA. Practical Action conducted a workshop in Galle on ‘Coastal Green Belt Formation’ in September. Necessity of appropriate technical standards and coordination among re-greening projects as highlighted and possibility of CHA as a co-ordinator and facilitator for co-ordination at the district level was discussed. A series of feature presentations were conducted under the Human Security Response Programme. These presentations were aimed at the humanitarian organizations, the victims and also the onlookers such as the media and government. The presentations covered the actual goings on in the different parts of the country and challenges faced by the NGOs. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 53 Benchmarking Standards and Good Governance The maintenance of the highest level of ethics, standards and administration are crucial to those of us engaged in the field of humanitarian services, perhaps more so than in other fields of endeavour. To deal with the human situation and its myriad needs, a direct approach needs to be taken. Through frankness and transparency of dialogue, sincerity of purpose in addressing problem areas and transparency and full accountability in all actions, CHA and our collaborating partners strive to adopt exemplary standards and equally exemplary governance. Thus, one of the main aims of CHA is to successfully promote ‘professionalization’ of the humanitarian sector. This means facilitating the development of professional skills of agencies in the humanitarian sector, including the CHA 54 CHA Secretariat as well as developing and promoting guidelines, standards and principles relevant to the humanitarian sector. CHA is constantly on a mission to discover training requirements, identify resources to meet those requirements and to implement new training programmes that match developing needs. Working to improve the humanitarian sector involves getting together with our partners and coming up with innovative ways to help those people who look up to us for inspiration and hope. This involves a continuous journey in facilitation, development and identification of needs and an unquenchable thirst to reach higher to meet challenges and keep pace with international humanitarian standards. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 55 CHA - RedR Programme on Humanitarian Cardre and minimum standards in Disaster Response THE LEARNING SUPPORT UNIT (CHA/RedR-UK PROGRAMME) In order to achieve our objective, CHA’s staff must be well equipped and able to take up each challenge that comes our way. This requires streamlining timely and effective training for our representatives and partners. RedR-UK is a registered charity which trains competent and committed personnel to respond to disaster relief and humanitarian needs worldwide. In affiliation with CHA, the RedR-UK Programme meets NGO skills development needs and endeavours to build local capacities. During the course of the year a series of joint workshops were organized between RedR and CHA staff. The workshops provided mutual understanding of organizational strategies, capacities and constraints. They also explored the best focus for ongoing collaboration and conducted key sessions on information sharing, partnership characteristics, areas of common interest and activity planning. They also did not fail to identify and address areas in which there were programme weaknesses. Discussion and preliminary arrangements were made for the visit of an independent Evaluator to map out the Strategic Plan for RedR-UK and CHA Learning Support and Capacity Building Programme, to further enhance these programmes. In order to facilitate our representatives and partners in the work they do, we attempt to maintain uniformity in the standards and procedures we follow. As part of this effort, Administrative and Operational Guidelines for District Officers (DOs) and District Learning Support Officers (DLSOs) were drafted and distributed for implementation of CHA-RedR activities in the districts. MAINTAINING STANDARDS To reach excellence, optimum standards must be maintained. This means reviewing and revising existing standards and striving for professionalism and efficiency of the highest level. In June this year, the external appraisal for the ISO Systems Certification was conducted and CHA’s Quality Management System (QMS) was assessed for compliance with ISO 9001:2000 requirements. The audit revealed zero non-conformity. 56 CHA ISO audit with District Officers Free Legal Aid Programme in Galle Minimum standards for the Institute of Human Rights were also introduced and monitoring is in progress. QMS activities in the context of district activities were discussed in detail with District Officers and staff. Areas of focus included Administration and Finance, District Resource Centres, IT and Project activities. In a new initiative, CHA is now developing a role in assisting companies to achieve SA 8000 standards. CHA carried out a Social Audit of the Hayley’s MGT Knitting Mills Ltd. The factory in Horana was visited and inspected for SA 8000 standards which are increasingly being adopted by companies as a part of Corporate Social Responsibility. SA 8000 is a global social accountability standard for decent working conditions, developed and overseen by Social Accountability International. It is based on the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights Convention on the Rights of the Child and various International Labour Organization (ILO) conventions. A committee headed by the NGO Secretariat and the ECHO to examine existing modes of operation using the Code of Conduct for Humanitarian Agencies as well as Guiding Principles, was appointed by the Ministry of Human Rights and Disaster Management in order to formulate an updated version. The Code of Conduct for the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Organizations in Disaster Relief, the Operating Manual for Humanitarian Agencies in Sri Lanka and Sphere Standards were dispatched to the Ministry of Defence and the Ministry of Disaster Management and Human Rights to update them on the Code of Conduct and Standards currently being adhered to by agencies. Agencies were identified in the districts through District Officers, to conduct training on Best Practices for NGOs. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 57 Batticaloa District Consortia meeting Batticaloa District Consortia meeting DISTRICT CONSORTIA Powering those at the district level with timely information is critical to ensuring that agencies in the districts are able to carry out their functions with competence. The District Consortia (DC) acts as a resource base at the district level and provides information and facilitation on behalf of local agencies in liaison with relevant authorities. A visit was made to the DC in Trincomalee and emphasize was given to issues pertaining to the district and the need for local agencies to continue work even under trying conditions. Human Security issues relating to the district were discussed and issues pertaining to the restriction on transport of goods through the Sambalthivu check point in Trincomalee were clarified. The DC in Batticaloa provided assistance in dealing with the humanitarian crisis in Batticaloa. Needs of the IDPs submitted by the DC were forwarded to all agencies and advocated with relevant officials in Colombo. The Mannar DC took up issues pertaining to IDPs in the Madhu Church. CHA liaised with agencies and relevant Government authorities to provide relief and assistance to more than ten thousand IDPs seeking shelter at the Church. GENERAL In its quest to improve the lives of those suffering as a result of conflict, disaster and other tragic circumstances, CHA continued to promote and advocate humanitarian standards. NGOs and their activities have received much criticism in recent times primarily in the press. This has made it an imperative to ensure and promote good humanitarian practice. In an effort to find ways to mitigate the damage caused by the negative attitude towards NGOs, BBC on its own inititative sent a a representative to visit us and discussed issues relating to negative publicity and opened the way forward to train agencies in Media Skills. CHA is currently looking for funders to implement this proposal. 58 CHA Humanitarian Forum held in Batticaloa Meeting with the Board of Directors Guiding Principles for NGO/Operational Manual-Orientation of the principles was carried out in Batticaloa and Mannar. Workshops were conducted for representatives from Government department, religious institutions and those involved in humanitarian and development work. PUBLIC REPORTS The CHA Public Reports, initiated in 2006, served to provide beneficiaries and communities with monthly updates on the activities of NGOs within their home regions. Information was kept to basic essentials, with utmost attention paid to time lines and the status of projects/programmes. Reports were published and translated into three languages and posted in public places through CHA’s 12 District offices. In May 2007, CHA published public reports for 11 Districts and information was expanded to include vital information for those affected by conflict. Due to time constraints and individual agency hesitations, date collection for the Public reports became an issue which would jeopardize the accuracy of the information, hence CHA temporarily stalled the initiative whilst alternative solutions were sought. HUMANITARIAN FORUM In 2007, the humanitarian forum was conducted in Kalutara, Trincomalee and Batticaloa. With the majority of the southern coastal districts having been covered the previous year, efforts were sought to implement the forum in the Northern and Eastern districts. This was somewhat restrained due to the country situation, but the fora in Trincomalee and Batticaloa were successful and generated much useful information for future humanitarian efforts as well as current proceedings. PLEASE GIVE A STORY ANNUAL REPORT 2007 59 Executive Director’s Message ACTING TODAY, FOR A BETTER TOMORROW Though deemed a ‘middle-income nation’, Sri Lanka’s economy displays gross inequities in the spread of growth and income. The economic dynamism of the Western Province is unknown to the rest of the country. Poverty in the estate sector is endemic. Urban poverty has declined rapidly, but poverty in rural Sri Lanka remains mainly unchanged. The economy as a whole remains poorly integrated, with seventy percent of the export segment generated by ten products. This situation has not changed in over five years, putting the economy at risk from demand and price fluctuations in key exports. Thus the prospect of generating development funding from the nation’s own economic activity is small. Meanwhile, the composition of Sri Lanka’s international markets is changing, not necessarily for the better, with regional trade looming ever more important and trade with the rest of the world receding if we do not become smart in terms of our strategies for exports. As the Western World, led by the USA, slips into recession in 2008-2009, global financing will have an element of volatility. FULFILLING DEVELOPMENT GOALS Sri Lanka, like many other UN member states, has embraced the Millennium Development Goals. While the country scores highly on some goal indicators, such as maternal and child mortality, it is falling behind on others. The cost of recovery for those affected by the ongoing conflict, residual gaps from 2004 tsunami and general impoverishment is high. Despite strong and substantial international support, there remains a funding deficit. Meanwhile, regional inequities threaten development. Comparative deficits in assistance and service provision in some communities relative to others, as well as unfulfilled expectations, actually have the potential to create new conflicts. While progress has been made in the last few years, there are still many areas that need much improvement. We must set goals that enable us to reach the level of development as achieved by some countries in the South Asian region. 60 CHA “We work to ensure that development issues and the need to address them is clear to all Sri Lankans, whether they speak English, Sinhala or Tamil” WHAT MOTIVATES US In its eleventh year of operation, the Consortium of Humanitarian Agencies is now an established brand in the Sri Lanka non-profit sector. We represent the resources and capacities of several national and international organizations, to which are added the education and competence of our own staff and the hopes and aspirations of many Sri Lankans. Our focus is on ensuring human dignity, on seeing that people’s lives are not degraded by conflict, disasters and impoverishment. Our approach is essentially humanistic. Thus, we should not be seen purely as an NGO active in poverty alleviation, relief and rehabilitation. CHA is also an investor, channelling funds, skills and other resources to drive development in Sri Lanka, not for profit but from humanitarian motives such as the wish to establish greater equity among members of Sri Lankan society. CHA also has a long-term commitment to non-discriminatory development in Sri Lanka and an undertaking to see fair play in this context. Thus, we work to ensure that development issues and the need to address them is clear to all Sri Lankans, whether they speak English, Sinhala or Tamil. At present, the majority of citizens are denied the opportunity to become partners in development because of linguistic barriers. CHA is committed to equalize development opportunities financially, linguistically and numerically. Our vision is shaped by the need to ensure that Sri Lanka’s commitment to realize the Millennium Development Goals does not falter, and that - as far as possible - the goals themselves are achieved by the target date of 2015. The present deficits and disasters do not help, but the current phase is a transitional one. We must and shall move on. OPERATIONAL CONSTRAINTS With the escalation of conflict and the consequent hiatus in rehabilitation and development of the North and East of the country, CHA and its partners have found themselves under increasing constraints, resulting in much frustration and disappointment. Our partners, who daily seek a response to their pressing needs and problems, have at times questioned our ability to operate effectively in such a context. Disagreements, hitherto unknown, have arisen from this. Our partners expect CHA to show strong leadership in troubled times, while CHA itself seeks to move forward with mutual trust and respect. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 61 Executive Director’s Message Our public visibility has given us strength, but it has also raised expectations among both humanitarian agencies and members of the public. The great number of letters we receive from people in need bears testimony to this. In Parliament, the Select Committee on Foreign-Funded NGOs called on us to lead an initiative on enhanced independent oversight of the sector. Looking forward, we anticipate that financial support for the non-profit sector will undergo a dramatic reduction. Much NGO funding has been from bilateral Government sources; with changes in political direction, these sources are gradually becoming less accessible. The 2004 tsunami broke this trend temporarily and spectacularly: we received financial assistance in volumes never before seen, anywhere in the world. Some of this money was disbursed directly to local agencies. The tsunami, of course, was remarkable in the outpouring of humanitarian assistance it evoked. The economic, infrastructural and human-development losses across the region affected by the tsunami seemed appallingly high - costs were assessed at around $ 9.9 billion – yet appeals brought in at least $ 13.5 billion. Given that 1.9 million people were said to be directly affected by the tsunami, these receipts amounted to assistance of $ 7,100 per affected person - a generous sum indeed. Moreover, assistance in kind and services provided free of charge by Sri Lankan and foreign volunteers would, if valued, have added considerable heft to this figure. Of course, the money was not simply handed over to beneficiaries but channeled through a number of projects and programmes. It is safe to assume that a few billion, or at least several hundred million dollars donated towards post-tsunami recovery remain unspent. A JOB TO BE DONE Given the existence of such funds, it is ironic that the non-profit sector is facing a resource crunch. This is commonly attributed to a decline in several bilateral sources of funding, hostile working environment as well as inadequate engagement by those whose task it is to set directions for Sri Lanka in development, disaster management and investment. Whatever the causes, the situation is real, and demands to be addressed. To do so, we will have to establish optimum accountability and transparency and maintain the highest ethical standards. We shall have to equalize opportunities within the sector for the access of resources and coordinate their distribution. Our partnerships with Government, business, development partners, private philanthropists around the world including our nationals overseas and - most important - people from all parts of the country will have to be relevant, effective and efficient. 62 CHA “Our partnerships with Government, business, development partners, private philanthropists around the world including our nationals overseas and - most important - people from all parts of the country will have to be relevant, effective and efficient” The non-profit sector has recently been the target of unfortunate accusations regarding inefficiency and a lack of accountability and transparency. This has affected its reputation for competence among the general public. In response we need to demonstrate that the sector is in fact highly capable, and staffed largely by professionals with solid formal skills and competencies. There also lies ahead the struggle to show that Sri Lankan and foreign nationals are equally capable of measuring, sourcing, planning and delivering interventions as equals within the respective mandates of the agencies that employ them. Funding streams by large organizations continue to discriminate on this particular point. We will work to ensure our independence and integrity is not held hostage by funds nor will we rest until we secure the sector financially. We have begun working already to this end. For the future, many of the issues raised earlier must be resolved if our work is to be relevant and successful. J. Thiagarajah Executive Director March 6, 2008 ANNUAL REPORT 2007 63 Our People MR. V. KAILASAPILLAI Chairman/Member MS. ANUSHYA COOMARASWAMY Treasurer/Member MR . JEEVAN THIAGARAJAH Executive Director (CHA)/Member MR. F RANK STEPHENS Member MR . JOREN KRISTENSEN Member MR . Y U - HWA - LI Member MR . N ICK O SBORNE Member MR. ROSHAN MENDIS Member Board of Directors MR. SANTHOSH J EYRAM DR. VISHAKA HIDELLAGE Member Member 64 CHA 1 2 3 Audit & Management Committee 4 5 (1) MS. ANUSHYA COOMARASWAMY - Treasurer (2) MR. JEEVAN THIAGARAJAH - Executive Director (CHA) (3) MR. PRASHAN DE MEL - Audit Committee Member (4) MR. RUWAN DE SILVA - Audit Committee Member (5) MR. A.H. ZULQARNAINE - Finance Manager (CHA) 1 2 3 4 Managers 5 6 7 Assistant Managers 8 9 (1) MR. FIRZAN HASHIM - Deputy Executive Director (2) MR. A.H. ZULQARNAINE - Finance (3) MS. SHAMMI NISSANKA - Human Resources/Administration (4) MS. DHANYA RATNAVALE - Regional Programme/Relief & Rehabilitation (5) MS. BERNADINE JAYAWARDENE - Peace Related Activities (6) MS. HISHANTHI R. SOYSA - Programme Area One (7) MR. FRANCIS FERNANDO - Knowledge Centre (9) (8) MS. NAYOMI DHARMATILEKE - Assistant Manager, Advocacy MS. FAREEHA JALEEL - Assistant Manager, Peace Building ANNUAL REPORT 2007 65 Staff Aijieentha Sampasivamoorthy Finance Assistant Anandarajah Partheeban Programme Assistant Anne Dhanushia Mohamed Front Office Co-ordinator Anton Fernando Driver Anusha Kanesan Administrative Assistant Arunasalam Vaithialingam Senior Programme Officer Aslam Saja Resource Division Manager-RedR Asokan Kanapathipillai Livelihood Co-ordinator Bandulawathi Office Assistant Chandani Gunawardena Chandra Kumara Events Co-ordinator-RedR National Programme Officer Chathuri Jayasooriya Programme Officer Chathurika Jayawardene District Co-ordinator Chrishanthi Emmanuel Programme Assistant Chrishara Paranavitana Psychosocial Co-ordinator Christine Sundararajah Office Assistant Denis Dressel Senior Advisor Dhanushka De Silva Systems Administrator Dharmathileke Perera Information Assistant Dilhani Thiruchelvarajah Finance Officer-RedR Erandi Perera Finance Officer Erin Jesudasan Admin/HR Manager-RedR Eshani Kumarapperuma Finance Officer Francisca Gunathilake Communications Officer Gayani Harindini Finance Assistant Gayathri Puvimanasingham Events Administrator-RedR Gihani Martyn Senior Membership Co-ordinator Hemanthi Devatage Finance Assistant Indra Banu Nallawansa Security Indrasiri Weganthalawatte Senior Programme Officer Janaka Amarathunga Driver Jayanthi Somasekeram Senior Database Advisor Judith Jayaratnam Psychosocial District Liaising Officer Kasun Sudharshana Security Krishanthi Nagarajashekaran Programme Officer Krishnan Kandiah Driver Kumutha Subramaniyam Admin/Liaising Assist. Lakshi Maliyadda Programme Officer Lalith Samaraweera Information Assistant Malaka Samaraweera QMS Co-ordinator Manoja Liyana Arachchi Sinhala Translator Marimuttu Chandran Office Aide 66 CHA Staff Murugesapillai Subramaniam Web Developer Nadaraja Balasubramaniyam Documentation Officer Nalaka Chandrasekera Admin. Officer Nalin Liyanaarachchi Admin/Logistics Officer RedR Nayana Mayadunne Legal Officer Niagara Jinadasa Programme Officer Nilusha Weeraratne HR Officer Nimal Dassanayake Snr. Monit & Evaluation Officer Niranjini Rajaratnam Liaison Officer Prabu Wedagedarage Project Officer Prabashini Somasundaram Finance Officer Prasad Samarasekera Internal Auditor Praveena Premachandran Data Coder Priyangika Lakshmi Office Assistant Rohitha De Silva Finance Officer Ravindran Thambar Liaison Co-ordinator Rishard Sadikeen General Assistant Ruwini Perera Programme Officer Sachin Udunuwara Technical Officer Samanmali Seneviratne Data Coder Samantha Indrajith Printing Assistant Sandra Karunaratne Editor Sarath De Alwis Editor - Tabloid Sarath Ranaweera Driver Saroja Sangupillai Office Assistant Shantha Kulatunga Research Co-ordinator Sonali Seneviratne Programme Assistant Stanley Isaacksz Front Officer Subaskary Subramaniam Personal Assistant Sushanthy Gobalakrishnan DLSO RedR Thajudeen Nallawansa Security Thirunavukkarasu Thirumayuran Programme Officer Umesha Weerasinghe Finance Assistant-RedR Vasuki Kandasamy Finance Officer Velusamy Shanmugavel Office Assistant Vivek Chandrakumar Data Coder Wijedasa Witharanage Security Guard ANNUAL REPORT 2007 67 District Staff Ajith Priyantha Paralegal Lawyer Amal Mihiranga District Officer Anton Jegan Rajaratnam Prog/Monit. Officer Anton Sivakumar DLSO RedR Anton Varapragasam HR Desk Officer Anushman Ariyaratnam Information Assistant Asok kumar Security Chintha Wellalage CPN Volunteer Dilrukshi Gallage Assistant Dinitha Tharanga Information Assistant G.G. Bavani Office Aide Gunasundaram Achchuthan HR Desk Officer Inesha Ranaweera Information Assistant Isfaq Marikkar Prog./Monit. Officer Jagath Jayawardena DLSO Jalaldeen Nilamdeen Information Co-ordinator Janaka Priyadarshana Field Officer Juliana Culas Paralegal Lawyer Kaleel Ilmudeen Assistant District Officer Kamal Nizar Information Assistant Kanagaratnam Manoranjani District Officer Projects Kanagasooriyam Naguleswaran Kunashinham Rathakrishnan Lavanya Kanagasabapathy Human Rights Desk Officer Mahdhavi Wijesuriya Assistant Malkanthie Sugathapala Office Manager RedR Mansoor Ahamed District Officer Projects Marimuthhu Rajamoney District Officer Assistant District officer Office Assistant Mery Remeciya Office Assistant Milanka Gajanayake Mohamed Mohamed Faris Information Assistant Assistant District Officer Rahmatullah District Officer Murugesh Ratnakumar District Officer Muththu Selvarani Information Assistant Nadesu Baskaran Field Officer Newton Kelly Reporting Assistant Nilushi Gunarathna Volunteer Nimal Karunasinghe Field Officer Nithyannanthy Gunaseelan HR Desk Officer Palaniyandi Pakiyarajah Office Assistant Parthasarathy Gunanayagam Information Assistant Peter Sinclair District Officer Piyasena Ratnayake Volunteer Prabhath Hettiarachchi District Officer Pradeep Kumara Field Officer Pratheeba Loganathan Pratheepa Selvananthan Pubudu Liyanagama District Officer Ranjan Amalraj Office Assistant Assistant District Officer Information Assistant 68 CHA District Staff Ranjith Sheilendrakumar Prog/ Monitoring Officer Rasika Niroshini District Officer Projects Rata Ralage Wimaladasa Office Assistant Roshan Kandanaarachchi ICT/Admin/ Logistics Assistant-RedR Samanmalee Hettiarachchi Assistant Sanjeewa Wijerathne Sathis Wijewardane Assistant District Officer District Advocacy Officer Sebasthiyanpillai Anthonypillai Security Shiraj Morugama DLSO RedR Sivarajah Kanesathash Solomon Basil Sylvester Sothinathan Puvanantherraja HR Desk Officer Srimal Liyanage Information Assistant Srinima De Silva Environment Co-ordinator Assistant District officer District Officer Sripriya Sabaretnam Office Assistant Subash Chameera District Officer Subajinidevi Pakiyarasa Assistant Suboda Sanka Kalupe Field Officer Suthagar Thuraisamy Security Guard Suveethan Kanagasabapathy HR Desk Officer Thambippillai Paskaran Prog/Monitoring Officer Thangavel Sakthiyalingam DLSO RedR Thanuja Withanage CPN Volunteer Tharanga Mihirani Assistant Vadivel Kalaichelvan District Officer Velautham Sritharan Prog/Monitoring Officer Vincent Arulappu Assistant District Officer Wimalanathan Sanjeev Information Co-ordinator Other Staff - not presented here Achala Edirisinghe Abhirami Ramanadan Amesh Ilanko Ayoni Perera Antony Wimalan Bopcy Roshana Croos Chawmini Sivakaran Dhanushan Kaneshayogan Dushanthi Fernando Glen Schumacher Hasitha Jayamaha Jasmin Asirvatham K.C. Ramesh Kajaluxmy Kamalendran Lakshanthi de Silva (RedR) Manian Sivakumar (RedR) Mashanka Liyanage Mewna Darshini Minna Thaheer Muditha Kaluthotage Mushthaque Mohideen Mohemed Mirshard Nileshi Goonesekera Niloufer Uvais Nadeera Indika Pathinathar Vinotharajah Pradeepa Jayawardene Prashan Fernando Sachini Sakesha Sameera Wijeratne Sanjeewa Pradeep Kumara Saravanamuthu Aravinthan Ruwan Algewattage Tharmendran Pulendran V. Muralidharan Varthani Sivathambi ANNUAL REPORT 2007 69 Stewardship and Governance GOVERNANCE POLICY AND ETHICS In the year under review, CHA revised its Memorandum and Articles of Association with a view to obtaining certification from the Registrar of Companies (in addition to certification by the Registrar of NGOs as at present). Under the earlier incorporation, formulation of policy and oversight were assigned to a Steering Committee. With the new incorporation, CHA is now governed by a Board of Directors. As a matter of policy, Board members serve in their individual capacities and have no direct or indirect interests in conflict with their functions. Underpinning ethical practice at Board level is a commitment to focus on the business of CHA, on issues and direction rather than on persons, politics or any external factor which might threaten the collegiality and professionalism of the Board. IMPROVING BOARD INDEPENDENCE AND EFFECTIVENESS CHA has been advised by the Parliamentary Select Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations to ensure greater independence of the Board. The majority of current members are heads of operational member-agencies of the consortium. They serve in their individual capacity and to that extent serve the Board rather than their employers. At present, the Articles of CHA provide for the nomination of a seven-member Board. We intend to take up the recommendation of the Select Committee and increase the independence of the Board by elevating to it members who provide necessary expertise, are representative but not employees of the nominating agencies. THE BOARD The Chairman directs the Board of Directors. The Executive Director is the CEO of CHA. The latter obtains concurrence from the Chairman in relation to the policy directives of the Board. 70 CHA The Board is elected by members at the Annual General Meeting. The election is held once the Annual Report and Audited Accounts of the consortium have been tabled. Nomination, election and ratification of the Board are thus directly the responsibility of members. The members of the board volunteer their time and do not recieve remuneration for their work. Board members must provide annual disclosure of their interests in CHA and its partners and activities before the Audit Report is released. Hence, it has been duly recorded under Section 25 of Notes to the Financial Statements by the Auditors. Board members who are absent from two consecutive meetings of the Board automatically become ineligible to hold office thereafter. BOARD COMMITTEES AND BOARD SECRETARY CHA is unique in having five standing committees: one for each of the four programme areas, together with the Financial Management Council (formerly known as the Audit & Management Committee). The membership of these committees brings to bear a potent collection of skills, expertise and representation to the implementation and interpretation of Board policy and issues arising therefrom. The committee system also provides for a measure of autonomous and independent decision-making within the policy framework set by the Board. Unfortunately, this potential is yet to be fully realized. CHA will need to continue making use of this structure for some time to come, and we shall improve its functioning wherever possible, the better to realize this benefit. The Secretaries to the Consortium are appointed by the Board of Directors and ratified at the AGM. They hold and manage all records of the Board as stipulated in the Articles of Association. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COUNCIL The Board of Directors appoints the Financial Management Council. It consists of three members, two of whom are qualified in finance and economics. The functions of the Council are to set targets for contributions and return on investment, to manage, monitor and review reserves and returns of the consortium, and to report all such details to the Board of Directors. The Council meets at least six times a year by mandate. The Executive Director convenes all meetings of the Council. Condensed financial statements are tabled for discussion at the monthly Board meeting. The Council is also tasked with designing, implementing and maintaining internal controls relevant to the preparation of the financial statements of the consortium. An annual audit and a nine-month interim audit are carried out by the External Auditors. These audits follow recommended practice for not-for-profit organizations as set out by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Sri Lanka. The Audit charges for the year were Rs. 528,425. As far as the Directors are aware, the Auditors of the Company do not have any other relationship with the Company. The Auditors do not have any interest in contracts with the Company. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 71 Stewardship and Governance STAKEHOLDER RIGHTS AND RELATIONS The Annual General Meeting of members is held once in every calendar year. Meetings other than the AGM are known as Extraordinary General Meetings. Every question submitted to the membership of CHA at an Annual or Extraordinary General Meeting is decided by show of hands. In the event of a tie, the Chairman makes the casting vote, which is always supplementary to the vote or votes he or she is entitled to as a member. Votes are cast personally, by proxy or by Attorney duly authorised. Only full members have the right to vote. HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT The Secretariat is manned by a staff of full-time employees under contract to the consortium. The CHA Staff Manual sets out guidelines and policy principles for all employees. Mid-year and annual performance appraisals are held. Staff training and development are the function of the Human Resources Management Unit. Staff are offered training relevant to their particular function and preferred career-development path; its content is in large part dependent on the individual’s performance appraisal. The handling of employee grievances is also the province of the Human Resources Management Unit. All possible measures are undertaken to ensure the safety of employees. All statutory compliances are met. In addition, staff members are covered by a medical insurance and enjoy numerous other benefits. BEST PRACTICE CERTIFICATION CHA has preserved its ISO 9001:2000 quality certification, which applies to organizations in the NGO sector, for the fifth year in succession. Independent, periodic evaluations have identified no non-conformities. Contracted staff undertake quality-management system (QMS) audits and monitor all activities to ensure they conform to the relevant standards. CHA is the only agency in Sri Lanka whose quality-management system adopts and applies international humanitarian sector best practices with Sri Lankan standards. V. Kailasapillai Chairman J. Thiagarajah Executive Director Director - Corporate Services (Pvt) Limited Company Secretary May 29, 2008 72 CHA List of Publications BOOKS LANGUAGE [1] [2] Code of Conduct Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standard in Disaster Response - Sphere Hand Book EST EST EST [3] [4] Internally Displaced Persons Long-Term Strategic Planning for the Psychosocial Sector in the Post-Tsunami Context - Sri Lanka EST EST EST EST EST EST S [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] Membership Directory Operating Manual for Humanitarian Agencies in Sri Lanka Peace Building Toolkit Regaining Your Livelihood Security Manual [10] What we should know about Government Lands NEWSLETTERS [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] CHA Newsletter CPN Newsletter Groundview IDP Newsletter Information Post Information Update Reflection Empowerment District Highlights (Soft version) ST EST EST EST E E EST E E REPORT [1] [2] Human Security Report Rapid Context Assessment EST EST CD [1] [2] Peace Building Directory Peace Building Toolkit EST EST E – English S – Sinhala T – Tamil ANNUAL REPORT 2007 73 Profile of the Membership Organization Name Sectoral Priorities Action Contre La Faim (ACF) Food and Agriculture; Water and sanitation Adventist Development and Relief Agency Sri Lanka Development; Education; Health; Livelihood; Rehabilitation; Water and sanitation All Ceylon Hindu Congress Child care and education; Relief Ampara District NGO Consortium Advocacy/lobbying; Child care and education; Conflict analysis; Conflict prevention; Development; Disaster Management; Early warning; Economic recovery; Education; Emergency relief; Environmental protection; Evaluation; Human rights; IDP; Income generation; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Relief; Training Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Conflict analysis; Conflict prevention; Development; Economic recovery; Emergency relief; Environmental protection; Evaluation; Facilitation; Food; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; Income generation; Infrastructure; Monitoring; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Relief; Research; Security; Strengthening civil society; Training; Vulnerable groups; Water and sanitation Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Child care and education; Development; Disaster management; Economic recovery; Education; Emergency relief; Environmental protection; Evaluation; Family development; Food; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; IDP; Income generation; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Small and medium industries; Training; Water and sanitation Agriculture; Conflict prevention; Co-ordination and support services; Development; Economic recovery; Education; Environmental protection; Facilitation; Food; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Income generation; Infrastructure; Monitoring; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Research; Strengthening civil society; Training; Vulnerable groups; Water and sanitation Child care and education; Development; Education; Environmental protection; Family development; Good governance/rule of law; Health; IDP; Income generation; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Small and medium industries; Water and sanitation; Child Protection Advocacy/lobbying; Child care and education; Development; Education; Food; Health; Income generation; Water and sanitation; Child rights Agriculture; Child care and education; Conflict analysis; Conflict prevention; Development; Economic recovery; Education; Emergency relief; Environmental protection; Evaluation; Facilitation; Family development; Food; Gender issues; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; Income generation; Infrastructure; Landmines; Mediation; Monitoring; Negotiations; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Research; Small and medium industries; Strengthening civil society; Training; Vulnerable groups; Water and sanitation CARE International in Sri Lanka Caritas Sri Lanka - SEDEC Centre for Human Development Christian Children's Fund INC Sri Lanka Christian Children's Fund of Canada Community Trust Fund 74 74 CHA Annual Budget Areas of Work US$ 2,623,214 Ampara, Hambantota, Nuwara Eliya SLRs. 19,000,000/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 2,000,000/- Ampara US$ 17,000,000 Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kandy, Kilinochchi, Mannar, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 2,147,483,647/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 72,690,177/- Badulla, Gampaha, Hambantota, Kandy, Kegalle, Kurunegala, Matara, Ratnapura Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Galle, Hambantota, Kegalle, Kurunegala, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Trincomalee US$ 120,503 Colombo, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kegalle SLRs. 17,500,000/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Colombo, Gampaha, Kurunegala, Mannar, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Trincomalee, Vavuniya ANNUAL REPORT 2007 75 75 Profile of the Membership Organization Name Sectoral Priorities Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Child care and education; Development; Disaster Management; Education; Environment; Environmental protection; Evaluation; Facilitation; Family development; Food and Agriculture; Funding; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Landmines; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Research; Sea resources; Small and medium industries; Training; Water and sanitation; Peace Advocacy/lobbying; Development; Disaster Management; Facilitation; Infrastructure; Training Advocacy/lobbying; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Human rights; Mediation; Negotiations; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Strengthening civil society Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Child care and education; Development; Economic recovery; Education; Evaluation; Facilitation; Good governance/rule of law; Health; Human rights; Income generation; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Food; Good governance/rule of law; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training; Water and sanitation Conflict analysis; Conflict prevention; Development; Early warning; Education; Evaluation; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Human rights; Mediation; Monitoring; Negotiations; Peacebuilding; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Research; Strengthening civil society; Training Consortium of NGO, Trincomalee District Consortium of Non-Governmental Organisations Mannar Cordaid Council of Non-Governmental Organisations Jaffna Danish Refugee Council ETC Lanka Family Rehabilitation Centre Health; Human rights; Income generation; Livelihood; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Relief FORUT - Sri Lanka Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Child care and education; Development; Education; Environmental protection; Family development; Food; Gender issues; Health; Human rights; IDP; Income generation; Livelihood; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Relief; Small and medium industries; Training; Water and sanitation Habitat for Humanity Sri Lanka Housing/transitional shelter; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation; Water and sanitation Handicap International Capacity building; Cooperation in project work; Information Exchange; Networking; Project collaboration; Technical assistance/advice; Training; Training modules; Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Conflict analysis; Conflict prevention; Development; Economic recovery; Education; Environmental protection; Funding; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; Income generation; Infrastructure; Mediation; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Research; Strengthening civil society; Vulnerable groups; Water and sanitation Helvetas Sri Lanka Institute of Human Rights Advocacy/lobbying; Education; Good governance/rule of law; Human rights; Training Lanka Evangelical Alliance Development Service Advocacy/lobbying; Child care and education; Development; Education; Emergency relief; Environmental protection; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; Income generation; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training; Water and sanitation 76 76 CHA Annual Budget Areas of Work SLRs. 1,005,000/- Trincomalee Mannar Jaffna SLRs. 290,000,000/- Anuradhapura, Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Mannar, Mullaitivu, Trincomalee, Vavuniya US$ 292,000 Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Colombo, Jaffna, Mannar, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 1,117,147,532/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Colombo, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Matale, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Puttalam, Vavuniya Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Galle, Hambantota, Kurunegala, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Ratnapura, Trincomalee Ampara, Batticaloa, Colombo, Hambantota, Trincomalee SLRs. 68,800,000/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kurunegalle, Mannar, Matara, Matle, Moneragala, Nuwara- Eliya, Puttalam, Pollanaruwa, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 65,000,000/- US$ 300,000 Ampara, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kandy, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matara, Ratnapura, Trincomalee ANNUAL REPORT 2007 77 77 Profile of the Membership Organization Name Sectoral Priorities Child care and education; Conflict prevention; Development; Education; Emergency relief; Family development; Food; Good governance/rule of law; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; Income generation; Infrastructure; Landmines; Mediation; Monitoring; Peacebuilding; PostTsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training; Vulnerable groups; Water and sanitation; Bio diversity, Advocacy/lobbying; Conflict analysis; Conflict prevention; Development; Education; Environmental protection; Evaluation; Facilitation; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Human rights; Mediation; Monitoring; Negotiations; Peacebuilding; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Research; Strengthening civil society; Training; Homes for children, Homes for elderly, Home for the disabled Landmines Advocacy/lobbying; Child care and education; Development; Education; Environmental protection; Gender issues; Human rights; Income generation; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Water and sanitation Advocacy/lobbying; Facilitation; Funding; Gender issues; Good governance/ rule of law; Human rights; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Reconciliation; Research; Training Advocacy/lobbying Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Development; Disaster Management; Education; Evaluation; Food; Food and Agriculture; Funding; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Research; Training; Multi Sector Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Development; Gender issues; Health; Housing/ transitional shelter; IDP; Income generation; Livelihood; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation; Relief; Water and sanitation Evaluation; Facilitation; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Training Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Development; Disaster Management; Education; Environment; Environmental protection; Facilitation; Food and Agriculture; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Housing/transitional shelter; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation; Research; Sea resources; Small and medium industries; Training; Water and sanitation Advocacy/lobbying; Training Child care and education; Development; Education; Environment; Family development; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Health; Housing/ transitional shelter; Human rights; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training; Water and sanitation Advocacy/lobbying; Child care and education; Development; Disaster management; Education; Human rights; IDP; Livelihood; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Relief; Research Lanka Jatika Sarvodaya Shramadana Sangamaya Methodist Church - Department of Social Responsibility Mines Advisory Group National Christian Council of Sri Lanka National Peace Council of Sri Lanka NGO Consortium Vavuniya Oxfam Australia Oxfam GB Peace and Community Action Practical Action South Asia Programme Puttalam District NGO Consortium Rural Development Foundation Save the Children in Sri Lanka 78 78 CHA Annual Budget Areas of Work Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 200,000,000/- Ampara, Batticaloa, Kilinochchi Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 32,782,800/- National, Province SLRs. 1,400,000/- Vavuniya SLRs. 500,000,000/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Hambantota, Kegalle, Matara, Polonnaruwa, Ratnapura SLRs. 1,591,653,235/- Ampara, Batticaloa, Colombo, Hambantota, Kilinochchi, Mannar, Matara, Trincomalee, Vavuniya Ampara, Batticaloa, Galle, Matara, Puttalam, Trincomalee SLRs. 432,000,000/- SLRs. 600,000/- Puttalam Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Mannar, Puttalam, Trincomalee, Vavuniya US$ 18,763,738 Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Mannar, Matara, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Trincomalee, Vavuniya ANNUAL REPORT 2007 79 79 Profile of the Membership Organization Name Sectoral Priorities Agriculture; Conflict prevention; Coordination and support services; Development; Disaster Management; Economic recovery; Education; Emergency relief; Environmental protection; Facilitation; Food; Gender issues; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Research; Sea resources; Small and medium industries; Strengthening civil society; Training; Vulnerable groups; Water and sanitation; Fisheries Conflict prevention; Development; Economic recovery; Health; Income generation; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Sea resources; Training Development; Gender issues; Income generation; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; PostTsunami; Small and medium industries; Training Capacity building; Psychosocial; Institutional development, Organisational capacity building Agriculture; Conflict prevention; Development; Economic recovery; Education; Emergency. relief; Funding; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Human rights; Income generation; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Research; Small and medium industries; Training; Vulnerable groups; Water and sanitation; Volunteer Exchange Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Child care and education; Development; Disaster management; Education; Environment; Environmental protection; Evaluation; Facilitation; Family development; Food and Agriculture; Gender issues; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training; Water and sanitation Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Child care and education; Co-ordination and support services; Development; Education; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Income generation; Infrastructure; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training; Water and sanitation Development; Education; Environment; Evaluation; Facilitation; Family development; Food and Agriculture; Gender issues; Housing/transitional shelter Sewalanka Foundation Survivors Associated Swisscontact Sri Lanka Voluntary Services Overseas World University Service of Canada - Sri Lanka World Vision Lanka YGRO ZOA Refugee Care Netherlands Associate Members Advocacy/lobbying; Child care and education; Development; Education; Environmental protection; Facilitation; Family development; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; Income generation; Peacebuilding; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Research; Small and medium industries; Training; Water and sanitation Child care and education; Development; Disaster Management; Education; Gender issues; Health; Income generation; Livelihood; Post-Tsunami; Training Agriculture; Development; Health; Livelihood; Relief; Training; Water and sanitation Development; Disaster Management; Education; Family development; Gender issues; Health; IDP; Income generation; Livelihood; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation; Water and sanitation ActionAid International Sri Lanka American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee American Refugee Committee Americares 80 80 CHA Annual Budget Areas of Work US$ 6,000,000 Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya Ampara, Batticaloa, Hambantota, Mannar, Matara, Puttalam, Vavuniya Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Matara, Trincomalee Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Jaffna, Kandy, Kurunegala, Nuwara Eliya, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 540,555,277/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Mannar, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Trincomalee, Vavuniya Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Puttalam, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 13,665,000/- Batticaloa, Jaffna, Kurunegala, Mannar, Vavuniya US$ 11,000,000 Ampara, Batticaloa, Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Mannar, Mullaitivu, Trincomalee SLRs. 917,852,572/- Ampara, Batticaloa, Galle, Hambantota, Jaffna, Matara, Trincomalee Galle, Hambantota, Matara SLRs. 52,500,000/- Trincomalee Ampara, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Matara ANNUAL REPORT 2007 81 81 Profile of the Membership Organization Name Christian Aid Sectoral Priorities Agriculture; Disaster Management; Gender issues; Housing/transitional shelter; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Training Child care and education; Development; Family development; Housing/ transitional shelter; Income generation; Infrastructure; Rehabilitation; Relief Agriculture; Child care and education; Education; Gender issues; Income generation; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation; Training Child care and education; Human rights; Income generation; Post-Tsunami; Training; Vulnerable groups Advocacy/lobbying; Disaster management; Facilitation; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Research; Training; Water and sanitation Child care and education; Disaster Management; Education; Family development; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; IDP; Income generation; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation; Relief Education; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood Child care and education; Emergency relief; Food; Health; Infrastructure; Water and sanitation Child care and education; Development; Family development; Funding; Housing/transitional shelter; Livelihood; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training Child care and education; Economic recovery; Education; Income generation; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation; Relief Education; Health; IDP; Infrastructure; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training; Water and sanitation Facilitation; Peacebuilding; Reconciliation Health; Rehabilitation Christian Reformed World Relief Committee Don Bosco Sri Lanka Enfants du Monde - Droits de L' Homme (Children of the World - Human Rights) Foundation for Co-Existence Humedica International Lanka GOAL International Relief and Development Sri Lanka Kindernothilfe Manitha Neyam Trust Merlin Non-violent Peaceforce Medical Teams International, Sri Lanka United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR - Sri Lanka) Agriculture; Development; Evaluation; Food; Housing/transitional shelter; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training; Water and sanitation Child care and education; Development; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Relief; Training; Water and sanitation World Concern Development Organisation Observers Asian Development Bank Infrastructure; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation, Development Assistance Australian Agency for International Development Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Child care and education; Conflict analysis; Conflict prevention; Development; Economic recovery; Emergency relief; Environmental protection; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Health; Human rights; Income generation; Landmines; Peacebuilding; PostTsunami; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Strengthening civil society; Training; Water and sanitation 82 82 CHA Annual Budget US$ 4,500,000 Areas of Work Batticaloa, Trincomalee. Jaffna, Ampara Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha SLRs. 80,000,000/- Anuradhapura, Badulla, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Kandy, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Mullaitivu Matara US$ 7,000,000 Ampara, Batticaloa, Colombo, Mannar, Nuwara Eliya, Puttalam, Trincomalee SLRs. 500,000,000/- Batticaloa, Jaffna US$ 10.000,000 Ampara, Hambantota, Matara Hambantota SLRs. 12,000,000/- Batticaloa, Colombo, Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Mannar, Mullaitivu SLRs. 439,925,084/- Ampara, Batticaloa, Trincomalee SLRs. 140,000,000/SLRs. 61,310,850/- Batticaloa, Jaffna, Trincomalee Ampara, Colombo, Galle, Moneragala, Trincomalee US$ 4,500,000 Batticaloa, Colombo, Trincomalee Ampara, Batticaloa, Galle, Trincomalee US$ 220,000,000 SLRs. 2,145,000,000/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya ANNUAL REPORT 2007 83 83 Profile of the Membership Organization Name British High Commission Sectoral Priorities Advocacy/lobbying; Development; Evaluation; Facilitation; Funding; Good governance/rule of law; Human rights; Peacebuilding; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Canadian International Development Agency Programme Support Unit Child care and education; Development; Environmental protection; Food; Funding; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; IDP; Income generation; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Water and sanitation Advocacy/lobbying; Development; Disaster Management; Education; Environment; Environmental protection; Funding; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; IDP; Income generation; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Funding Funding Diakonia European Commission Directorate General for Humanitarian Aid German Technical Co-operation Development; Disaster Management; Education; Facilitation; Good governance/rule of law; Income generation; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Training Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Child care and education; Coordination and support services; Development; Early warning; Economic recovery; Education; Emergency relief; Environmental protection; Evaluation; Food; Funding; Gender issues; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; Income generation; Infrastructure; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Relief; Small and medium industries; Strengthening civil society; Training; Vulnerable groups; Water and sanitation Agriculture; Development; Economic recovery; Education; Environment; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Income generation; Infrastructure; PostTsunami; Rehabilitation; Small and medium industries; Water and sanitation International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies Japan Bank for International Co-operation Japan International Co-operation Agency Agriculture; Development; Education; Health; Infrastructure; Rehabilitation; Water and sanitation Vulnerable returnees, families (single headed/widows, landless IDPs in villages or welfare centres) recover from displacement and resume a decent livelihood urgently Education; Evaluation; Gender issues; Income generation; Psychosocial; Water and sanitation Education; Emergency relief; Housing/transitional shelter; IDP; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Rehabilitation; Relief; Strengthening civil society; Training; Water and sanitation; Rule of law Funds activities related to tsunami reconstruction, mitigating the effects of the conflict; Peace, democracy; Human rights, and Economic growth able to combat poverty. Advocacy/lobbying; Conflict prevention; Development; Emergency relief; Funding; Housing/transitional shelter; Income generation; Infrastructure; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Relief Movimondo Netherlands Organisation For International Co-operation Norwegian Refugee Council Swedish International Development Co-operation Agency Swiss Agency for Development and Co-operation 84 84 CHA Annual Budget Areas of Work Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya US$ 4,500,000 US$ 450,000 SLRs. 160,000,000/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya More in North East Batticaloa, Colombo, Jaffna, Kandy, Kilinochchi, Mullaitivu, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 79,000,000/- Ampara, Galle, Hambantota ,Trincomalee, Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kandy, Kegalle, Kilinochchi, Kurunegala, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Polonnaruwa, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya Ampara, Jaffna US$ 130,000,000 Ampara, Batticaloa, Galle, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kalutara, Kilinochchi, Matara, Moneragala, Trincomalee Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Colombo, Hambantota, Jaffna, Matara, Mullaitivu, Puttalam, Trincomalee, Vavuniya US$ 4,995,000 Colombo, Jaffna, Matara, Trincomalee ANNUAL REPORT 2007 85 85 Profile of the Membership Organization Name Sectoral Priorities Environmental protection; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; IDP; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Small and medium industries; Training; Water and sanitation Advocacy/lobbying; Development; Disaster management; Evaluation; Facilitation; Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Human rights; IDP; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Relief Advocacy/lobbying; Child care and education; Education; Gender issues; Health; Landmines; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Training; Water and sanitation; Emergency Relief Advocacy/lobbying; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; IDP; Relief The Asia Foundation United Nations (Resident Co-ordinator's Office) United Nations Children's Fund United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees United States Agency for International Development Temporary Members Dan Church Aid Agriculture; Education; Food; Gender issues; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Human rights; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Water and sanitation Advocacy/lobbying; Child care and education; Development; Disaster management; Education; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; Income generation; Livelihood; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Relief; Training; Water and sanitation; Multi Sector Capacity Building, Research, Networking, dialog facilitation and accompaniment Advocacy/lobbying; Agriculture; Child care and education; Development; Disaster management; Education; Environment; Family development; Food and Agriculture; Funding; Gender issues; Housing/transitional shelter; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Reconciliation; Rehabilitation; Relief; Research; Small and medium industries; Water and sanitation; Multi Sector Economic Opportunities: Community Development Emergency Relief: FRIDSRO International Alert Islamic Relief Committee Mercy Corps Norwegian Church Aid South Asian Region Pacific Asia Resource Centre (PARC) Sri Lanka Gender issues; Good governance/rule of law; Peacebuilding; Post-Tsunami; Psychosocial; Reconciliation; Relief; Water and sanitation Emergency relief; Research, Women’s empowerment People in Need Child care and education; Development; Education; Funding; Health; Housing/transitional shelter; IDP; Income generation; Infrastructure; Livelihood; Post-Tsunami; Rehabilitation; Relief; Sea resources; Training; Water and sanitation Education Room To Read Sri Lanka The Community Tsunami Early-warning Centre The Humpty Dumpty Institute (THE HDI) Disaster Management; Environmental protection; Gender issues; Human rights; Post-Tsunami; Research; Training Landmines; Dairy Development 86 86 CHA Annual Budget Areas of Work Ampara, Anuradhapura, Badulla, Batticaloa, Galle, Hambantota, Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Mannar, Matale, Matara, Moneragala, Mullaitivu, Nuwara Eliya, Puttalam, Ratnapura, Trincomalee, Vavuniya US$ 8,000,000 Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Colombo, Jaffna, Kilinochchi, Mannar, Mullaitivu, Puttalam, Trincomalee, Vavuniya SLRs. 132,500,000/- Ampara, Batticaloa, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Jaffna, Matara, Trincomalee US$ 1,500,000 Kandy SLRs. 25,000,000/- Island-wide SLRs. 2,000,000/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Galle, Hambantota, Kegalle, Kurunegala, Mannar, Puttalam, Trincomalee Ampara, Batticaloa, Hambantota, Trincomalee US$ 3,000,000 Ampara, Anuradhapura, Batticaloa, Colombo, Galle, Gampaha, Hambantota, Kalutara, Matara, Moneragala Colombo/Jaffna US$ 1,938,550 Ampara, Trincomalee SLRs. 85,715,700/- Ampara, Anuradhapura, Galle, Hambantota, Jaffna, Matale, Matara, Puttalam Galle Jaffna ANNUAL REPORT 2007 87 87 Audit Committee Report The Audit and Management Committee is appointed by the Board of Directors of CHA to support the Executive Director in a continuous process to improve the accounting and reporting procedures within CHA towards maintaining best corporate governance practices. The Committee is headed by a member of the Board and includes two (2) financial officers of CHA member agencies. The Executive Director and members of the Finance Division of CHA are also present at meetings. The Committee has met on five (5) occasions during the year to review the quarterly Financial Statements of CHA and to consider its financial position and investment policy. The Committee continues to focus on the need for improve reporting to the Management and to the Board. During the year the Committee introduced a system of monthly reporting which included details of the operating activities of the organization, the movement of donor funding received and the investment of funds. Other matters that were considered during the period were • To meet with the external Auditors to plan the final audit for the year; and to ensure that the Auditors would accept Financial Statements prepared in accordance with the SLSoRP; • To monitor the surplus funds available with the Organization; and to approve the investment of such funds. The Board’s recommendations at these meetings were communicated to the Executive Director and the Finance Division for implementation. In addition the Committee also continued to support a process facilitated by CHA to appeal to the relevant authorities on the introduction and implementation of a tax on funding received by Non-Governmental Organizations. Anushya Coomaraswamy Head of the Audit and Finance Committee February 25, 2008 90 CHA Independent Auditor’s Report To the Members of Consortium of Humanitarian Agencies (Guarantee) Limited [FORMERLY KNOWN AS CONSORTIUM OF HUMANITARIAN AGENCIES] REPORT ON THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 1. We have audited the accompanying financial statements of Consortium of Humanitarian Agencies (Guarantee) Limited, (the Consortium) which comprise the balance sheet as at 31 December 2007, and the Statement of Financial Activities, statement of changes in accumulated fund and cash flow statement for the year then ended, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes as set out on pages 92 to 125. MANAGEMENT’S RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 2. Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with Sri Lanka Statement of Recommended Practices for Not-for-Profit Organizations. This responsibility includes: designing, implementing and maintaining internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances. SCOPE OF AUDIT AND BASIS OF OPINION 3. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Sri Lanka Auditing Standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. 4. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. 5 . We have obtained all the information and explanations which to the best of our knowledge and belief were necessary for the purposes of our audit. We therefore believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. OPINION 6 . In our opinion, so far as appears from our examination, the Consortium maintained proper accounting records for the year ended 31 December 2007 and the financial statements give a true and fair view of the Consortium's state-of-affairs as at 31 December 2007 and of its net surplus and cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Sri Lanka Statement of Recommended Practices for Not-for-Profit Organizations. REPORT ON OTHER LEGAL AND REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS 7. These financial statements also comply with the requirements of Section 151 (2) of the Companies Act No. 07 of 2007. Chartered Accountants Colombo ANNUAL REPORT 2007 91 Statement of Financial Activities (All amounts in Sri Lanka Rupees) Year ended 31 December Notes 2007 2006 Incoming resources Project Expenditure Staff expenses Other direct cost Other indirect expenditure Total project cost Net surplus on projects Revenue earned Administrative expenses Publicity expenses Other expenses Net deficit from operating activities Finance income Net surplus after finance income Income tax expenses Net surplus after tax 3 241,186,654 222,059,193 4 5 6 49,731,886 146,527,626 44,927,142 (241,186,654) Nil 26,681,975 146,848,661 48,528,557 (222,059,193) Nil 11,208,342 (12,596,446) (2,806,057) (903,459) (5,097,620) 14,722,449 9,624,829 (304,779) 9,320,050 8 9 10 8,321,580 (17,611,343) (1,871,520) (192,584) (11,353,867) 11 16,583,189 5,229,322 12 (874,927) 4,354,395 The notes on pages 96 to 125 form an integral part of these financial statements. Report of the Auditors on page 91. 92 CHA Balance Sheet (All amounts in Sri Lanka Rupees) As at 31 December Notes 2007 2006 ASSETS Non-Current Assets Property, plant & equipment Current Assets Receivables and prepayments Short-term investments Cash and cash equivalents 13 1,477,393 3,076,982 14 15 16 33,674,754 33,327,127 115,504,426 182,506,307 183,983,700 49,870,028 15,000,000 152,777,452 217,647,480 220,724,462 FUNDINGS AND LIABILITIES Unrestricted fund Restricted fund 31,671,456 134,313,814 165,985,270 Non-Current Liabilities Defined benefit obligation 32,691,027 164,309,424 197,000,451 20 4,509,140 4,509,140 2,690,270 2,690,270 Current Liabilities Payables Tax payable Borrowing 17 18 12,594,738 615,868 278,686 13,489,292 17,998,432 183,983,702 13,486,221 216,519 7,331,001 21,033,741 23,724,011 220,724,462 The Board of Directors is responsible for preparation and presentation of these financial statements. These financial statements were approved by the Board of Directors on March 28, 2008. V. Kailasapillai Chairman J. Thiagarajah Executive Director I certify that these financial statements have been prepared in compliance with the requirements of the Companies Act No. 07 of 2007. A.H. Zulqarnaine Finance Manager The notes on pages 96 to 125 form an integral part of these financial statements. Report of the Auditors on page 91. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 93 Statement of Changes in Accumulated Fund (All amounts in Sri Lanka Rupees) Restricted Notes Fund Unrestricted Fund Total Balance at January 1, 2006 - as previously reported - prior year adjustments As restated Excess of expenditure over income Funds received during the year Receivable from donors Funds transferred to statement of financial activities Funds transferred from restricted fund Funds returned during the year Provisions reversed to restricted fund Balance at December 31, 2006 Balance at January 1, 2007 Excess of expenditure over income Funds received during the year Receivable from Donors (Refer Note 14) Funds transferred from restricted fund Funds transferred to statement of financial activities Funds returned during the year Balance at December 31, 2007 142,847,526 220,000 143,067,526 10,760,155 226,217,804 7,744,670 (222,059,193) (1,097,359) (518,459) 194,280 164,309,424 164,309,424 10,770,584 216,381,013 835,767 (33,000) (241,186,654) (16,763,320) 134,313,814 33,253,773 (220,000) 33,033,773 (1,440,105) Nil Nil Nil 1,097,359 Nil Nil 32,691,027 32,691,027 (6,416,189) 7,000,000 Nil 33,000 (1,636,382) Nil 31,671,456 176,101,299 Nil 176,101,299 9,320,050 226,217,804 7,744,670 (222,059,193) Nil (518,459) 194,280 197,000,451 197,000,451 4,354,395 223,381,013 835,767 Nil (242,823,036) (16,763,320) 165,985,270 The notes on pages 96 to 125 form an integral part of these financial statements. Report of the Auditors on page 91. 94 CHA Cash Flow Statement (All amounts in Sri Lanka Rupees) Year ended 31 December Notes 2007 2006 Operating Activities Cash generated from/(used in ) operations Defined benefit obligations paid Interest received Tax paid Net cash generated from/(used in) operating activities Project Activities Funds received for projects Cash paid out for project activities Funds returned during the year Funds from Donors Excess of (funds paid out over funds received)/ retained from project activities Investing Activities Purchase of property, plant & equipment Disposal of property, plant & equipment Investment in short-term investments Disposal of investment Net cash used in investing activities Decrease in cash and cash equivalents Movement in Cash and Cash Equivalents At start of year Decrease At end of the year 23 20 20,161,282 Nil 4,733,680 (475,580) 24,419,382 (11,340,028) (90,000) 2,038,881 (26,434) (9,417,581) 19 19 19 216,381,013 (241,186,654) (16,763,320) 5,363,618 (36,205,343) 226,217,804 (222,059,193) (324,179) Nil 3,834,432 13 15 (107,623) Nil (33,327,127) 15,000,000 (18,434,750) (30,220,711) (940,769) 15,000 (15,000,000) Nil (15,925,769) (21,508,918) 145,446,451 (30,220,711) 16 115,225,740 166,955,369 (21,508,918) 145,446,451 The notes on pages 96 to 119 form an integral part of these financial statements. Report of the Auditors on page 91. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 95 Notes to the Financial Statements (In the notes all amounts are shown in Sri Lanka Rupees unless otherwise stated) 1. GENERAL INFORMATION The Consortium of Humanitarian Agencies (Guarantee) Limited is a Non-Governmental Organization registered with the Department of Social Services under Social Services Act No. 31 of 1980 as amended by Act No. 8 of 1998 and registered under The Companies Act, No. 17 of 1982 as Company Limited by Guarantee. The Board of Directors consists of 10 members of which 1 member is ex-officio Director: Mr. V. Kailasapillai - Chairman (Non-Salaried) Dr. (Ms.) Vishaka Hidellage - (Non-Salaried) M r. Roshan Mendis - (Non-Salaried) Mr. Yu-Hwa-Li - (Non-Salaried) M r. Joren Kristensen - (Non-Salaried) M r. Nick Osborne - (Non-Salaried) M s. Anushya Coomaraswamy - (Non-Salaried) M r. Frank Stephens - (Non-Salaried) M r. Santhosh Jeyram - (Non-Salaried) Ex-Officio Mr. Jeevan Thiagarajah - Executive Director - (CHA) (Salaried) The principal places of project activities of the organization are located in 13 Districts of North, East & South. Except for certain projects that will conclude on the completion of their relevant activities in accordance with the relevant terms of reference as per the Donor agreements, the financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis. The notes to the financial statement on pages 96 to 119 are an integral part of the financial statements. These financial statements have been approved for issue by the Board of Directors on March 28, 2008. Summary of project activities carried out during the year is provided below: Project Advisory Services for Conflict Transformation Nature of Activities Carried Out Developing and refining strategies and approaches for implementation, facilitation of internal and external learning and capacity development, also developing standards on conflict sensitivity and consulting Donor Organization German Technical Co-operation (GTZ) Assisting IDPs with Immediate Needs in Providing assistance to families with provision of food North & East items of nutritional value, address their health needs by providing mosquito repellents, organizing health camps and improve water and sanitation facilities in camp sites Capacity Building, Documentation and Advocacy Support Co-ordination and implementation of human rights accountability coalition research activities International Medical Health Organization The Asia Foundation (TAF) Report of the Auditors on page 91. 96 CHA Project Civil Society Peace Tabloid Nature of Activities Carried Out Donor Organization Peace and Development Unit The society's awareness is enhanced on the tangible benefits of peace, co-operation, development and conflict transformation and in turn helps mobilize and strengthen the country's peace movement Research survey of citizens' perceptions related to services delivered by their local authority; good governance practices of their local authority; and priority issues to be addressed by their local authority Aims to develop a network among resource centres to initiate and strengthen the civil society on information sharing Mutual improvement of the teachers and students knowledge through inter cultural and mastering of the ability to use the medium enabling communication. Providing emergency assistance and long-term rehabilitation to tsunami victims AcNielsen Citizen Demand Survey Civil Society Network on Information Sharing Berghorf Foundation Development and Twinning of Schools in Matara District and Dep of Des Hautes-Pyrenees (France) Emergency Assistance to Tsunami Victims in SL (TR) Secours Populaire Francais (SPF) The Danish Development Corporation Office N(o)vib Oxfam Netherlands Diakonia - I Diakonia - II Diakonia Environment Disaster Management Programme Focus on natural disaster mitigation measures via awareness activity and involving grass root levels in participatory activities towards mitigation of natural disasters to ensure effectiveness and efficiency of Environment Disaster Management. Provide assistance to recover health of the tsunami victims and their families and to sustain their livelihood Training programme on database designing and data analysis using epiInfo software and statistical data analysis using SPSS Co-ordination of disaster assistance and promotion of accountability and transparency of humanitarian action Health and Livelihood Grants Programme HRAC Training Americare World Vision SL Human Security Response Project (HSRP) World Vision SL Mercy Corps SL Oxfam GB Save The Children SL CARE International SL Forut Sri Lanka Diakonia Asia Regional Office American Jewish Private Donor IASC Guidelines Workshop Workshop on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support on Emergency Settings to sensitize donor community, policymakers, Government Authorities and the PS organizations on the implementation and use of the IASC Guidelines for quality service provision. Reintegration and follow-up programme for ex-detainees in prison Institutional Capacity Building of the Prison Department (PTP) British High Commission ANNUAL REPORT 2007 97 Notes to the Financial Statements Project Juvenile Justice Programme Nature of Activities Carried Out Provides a transportation service to children in conflict with the law, address their issues and fulfils identified needs, in the form of provisions, service and mediation Collection of information in a comprehensive manner on NGO activities in Sri Lanka to assist in policy and strategic planning for the future CHA carried out courses and workshops for Key policy makers in Psychosocial developmental practices Forum coordination for advocacy regarding the total ban of landmines in the country Donor Organization P&D Unit JICA Japan NGO Desk - 06/07 JICA Japan International Cooperation Agency Key Policy Maker Course (PMC) Helvetas Sri Lanka Landmines Ban Advocacy Forum (LBAF) - 05/06 Landmines Ban Advocacy Forum (LBAF) - 06/07 United Nations Development Programme The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs Landmines Ban Advocacy Forum Web Page (LBAF-Web page) - 06/07 Provision of information to parties who are interested in advocating for a total ban on the use of anti-personnel landmines Addressing documentation and other legal issues of IDP & resettled people Report on the post tsunami context to sensitize Government authorities, donors Psychosocial organizations on the suggested plan of action for the psychosocial service provision in Sri Lanka. Address the need for conflict sensitive practices in humanitarian/emergency assistance, development, corporation and post-tsunami reconstruction efforts in mainstreaming conflict sensitivity approaches in the humanitarian and development sector Newsletter on national protection and durable solutions for internally displaced persons from conflict-induced and tsunami-induced. Promotion of diversity, human rights and freedom and the provision of equal development opportunities for community. The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs The Brookings Institute Legal Aid to IDP's in North & East Long-Term Strategic Planning Printing Report United Nations Population Fund Mainstreaming Conflict Sensitivity The World Bank Norwegian Embassy Newsletters on Displacement The Brookings Institute Peace & Development Programme (P & D) The Royal Netherlands Embassy Swedish International Development Cooperation Norwegian Embassy The Royal Netherlands Embassy The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs MercyCorps SL Protection of Conflict Affected Persons Provide emergency humanitarian interventions for conflict affected persons in North and East Districts Promotion of Human Security, Core Support for District Consortia Providing core support to district consortia's for promotion of human security Promotion of Livelihood for Tsunami Affected & Vulnerable People Provide grants to promote livelihood for tsunami affected and vulnerable people, to increase production and market opportunities - Ampara District Report of the Auditors on page 91. 98 CHA Project Promotion of Livelihood for Tsunami Survivors in Sri Lanka Psychosocial Forum (PSF) Nature of Activities Carried Out Providing assistance to restore livelihood of tsunami victims Providing support to psychosocial initiatives in the District and network with the district coordinating bodies Printing and dissemination to obtain broad buy-in to the 'Best Practice Guidelines for Sri Lanka' among Psychosocial service providers, agency leaders, Government ministries and donors Conceptualize the available data and develop a database which can be made available both at Social Policy Analysis and Research Centre, University of Colombo and the Asia Foundation for potential research work. Regional Initiative Sustainable Livelihood & Enabling of Social and Political Participation (RSLSPP) Donor Organization Diakonia Norwegian Church Aid Psychosocial Guidelines Printing United Nations Population Fund Reducing Incidences and Effects of Torture Project The Asia Foundation Regional Initiative Sustainable Livelihood & Enabling of Social and Political Participation (RSLSPP) N(o)vib Oxfam Netherlands Relief Programme for Conflict Affected Providing emergency relief support to displaced people or IDPs who's livelihood have been interrupted due to instability in the Northern and Eastern Districts Research to Professionalize the Psychosocial Work in Sri Lanka Initiated a research project to structure issues related to psychosocial capacity building in Sri Lanka Diakonia Asia Regional Office Helvetas Sri Lanka Christian Children's Fund Inc CordAID International Strengthening Local Capacity for Peace Creation of middle level leaders mobilization to represent Building grass roots pressure negotiated settlement with a long-term impact to build local capacities for sustainable 'positive peace' Strengthening of Regional Psychosocial Support the strengthening and development of network Network for psychosocial sector and coordinate the activities to facilitate the PS programme Sustainable Livelihood Development in Aims to achieve sustainable livelihood to focus on People Sri Lanka becoming ‘investors’ not beneficiaries - Hambantota District Helvetas Sri Lanka American Jewish 2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of these financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated. 2 . 1 Basis of Preparation The financial statements are prepared in accordance with and comply with Statement of Recommended Practices for Not-for-Profit Organizations. The financial statements are prepared under the historical cost convention. 2 . 2 Foreign Currencies Foreign currency transactions are accounted for at the exchange rates prevailing at the date of the transactions: gains and losses resulting from the settlement of such transactions and from the translation of monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies, are recognized in the income and expenditure statement. Such balances are translated at year-end exchange rates. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 99 Notes to the Financial Statements 2.3 Property, Plant & Equipment All property, plant & equipment is stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is calculated on the straight line method to write off the cost of each asset to their residual value over their estimated useful life as follows: % Office equipment Office furniture Motor vehicle 25 25 20 Where the carrying amount of an asset is greater than its estimated recoverable amount it is written down immediately to its recoverable amount. Gains and losses on disposal of property, plant & equipment are determined by reference to their carrying amount and are taken into account in determining excess of expenditure over income before tax. 2.4 Operating Leases Leases of assets under which all the risk and benefits of ownership are effectively retained by the lessor are classified as operating leases. Payment made under operating leases are charged to the income and expenditure statement. 2.5 Receivables Receivables are stated at the amounts they are estimated to realize. Cash and Cash Equivalents For the purposes of the cash flow statement, cash and cash equivalents comprise cash in hand, deposits held at call with banks, net of bank overdrafts. In the Balance Sheet, bank overdrafts are included in borrowings in current liabilities. 2.7 Tax The charge for taxation is based on the results for the year as adjusted for disallowable items, when less than three fourths of the gross receipts are received from members. When more than three fourths of the gross receipts are from members, the Consortium is liable to pay tax at 20% on its liable interest income and liable rent income. 2.8 Defined Benefit Obligations Terminal benefits are provided for all employees of the Consortium at the rate of one half of the basic wage or salary applicable for the last month of the financial year, for each year of completed service. This provision is not externally funded, nor has it been actuarially valued. 2.9 Defined Contribution Plans All employees of the Consortium are members of the Employees' Provident Fund and Employees' Trust Fund, to which their employer contributes 12% and 3% respectively of such employees' basic wage or salary. 2.6 Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 00 CHA 2.10 Income Recognition Members' subscriptions, regular grants, interest income and directory sales are recognized in the period to which they relate. Any grants/funds received where the project has not commenced before the Balance Sheet date has been recognized as payables and income is recognized to be an amount equal to the expenses incurred for that respective project during the year. 2.11 Comparatives Where necessary, comparative figures have been adjusted to conform with changes in presentation in the current year. INCOMING RESOURCES SUMMARY 3. ACTIVITIES IN FURTHERANCE OF ORGANIZATION OBJECTIVES Notes 2007 2006 Grants - Restricted funding 19 241,186,654 222,059,193 PROJECT EXPENDITURE 4. STAFF EXPENSES Notes Salaries, direct wages and allowances Defined contribution plan 2007 43,245,118 6,486,768 49,731,886 2006 23,261,611 3,420,364 26,681,975 5. OTHER DIRECT COST Programme cost Assets purchased and written off 13 (b) 144,324,339 2,203,287 146,527,626 140,483,153 6,365,508 146,848,661 6. OTHER INDIRECT EXPENDITURE Notes 2007 2006 Administration cost Rent and rates Maintenance Professional fees Other indirect cost 10,221,900 1,228,221 1,070,949 1,587,708 30,818,364 44,927,142 41,284,855 1,045,146 1,214,131 181,667 4,802,758 48,528,557 222,059,193 Total Project Expenditure 241,186,654 Report of the Auditors on page 91. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 01 Notes to the Financial Statements 7. PROJECT ACTIVITY SUMMARY 2007 Transferred from Restricted Funds Project Nature of Activities carried out Name of Donor Organization B/F+During the year Fund Receipts Rs. 1,206,726 Advisory Services for Conflict Transformation Developing and refining strategies and approaches for implementation, and facilitation of internal and external learning and capacity development, also developing standards on conflict sensitivity and consulting German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) Assisting IDPs with Immediate needs in North & East Providing assistance to families by way of with provision of food items of nutritional value, addressing their health needs by providing repellents, organizing health camps and improving water and sanitation facilities in camp sites International Medical Health 2,203,582 Capacity Building, Documentation and Advocacy Support Co-ordination and implementation of human rights accountability coalition research activities The Asia Foundation (TAF) 229,846 Civil Society Peace Tabloid The society's awareness enhances the tangible benefits of peace co-operation development and conflict transformation which in turn helps mobilize and strengthen the country's peace movement Peace and Development Unit 2,658,597 Citizen Demand Survey Research survey of citizens' perceptions related to services delivered by their local authority; good governance practices of their local authority; and priority issues to be addressed by their local authority AcNielsen 483,990 Civil Society Network on Information Sharing Aims to develop a network among resource centres to initiate and strengthen the civil society on information sharing Berghorf Foundation 522,760 Balance carried forward Report of the Auditors on page 91. 7,305,501 1 02 CHA Total Amount Expended Staff Rs. Other Direct Cost Assets Programme Cost Rs. 446,726 Programme Management Cost Rs. 476,000 Total Rs. Balance carried forward 284,000 1,206,726 Nil 80,101 2,013,047 110,434 2,203,582 Nil 135,063 94,783 229,846 Nil 984,000 1,478,668 195,929 2,658,597 Nil 464,000 19,990 483,990 Nil 458,760 64,000 522,760 Nil 1,483,163 – 4,861,202 961,136 7,305,501 Nil ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 03 Notes to the Financial Statements Transferred from Restricted Funds Project Nature of Activities carried out Name of Donor Organization B/F+During the year Fund Receipts Rs. 7,305,501 Balance brought forward Development of Strategic Framework for Peace Creation of middle level leaders, mobilization to represent grass roots pressure, negotiated settlement with a long-term impact to build local capacities for sustainable 'positive peace' CordAID International 5,559,229 Development and Twinning of Schools in Matara District and Dep of Des Hautes_Pyrenees (France) Mutual improvement of the teachers and students’ knowledge through inter cultural activities and mastering of the ability to use the medium enabling communication Secours Populaire Francais (SPF) 211,462 Emergency Assistance to Tsunami Victims in SL (TR) Providing emergency systems and long-term rehabilitation to Tsunami victims. Danish Development Coporation N(o)vib Oxfam Netherlands Diakonia - I Diakonia - II 288,188 18,651 49,080 (9,784) Environment Disaster Management Programme Focus on natural disaster mitigation measures via awareness activity and involving grass root levels in participatory activities towards mitigation of natural disasters to ensure effectiveness and efficiency of Environment Disaster Management. Diakonia 13,318,424 Health and Livelihood Grants Programme Providing assistance to recover health of the tsunami victims and their families and to sustain their livelihood Americares 38,515,768 HRAC Training Training programme on Database designing and data analysis using epiInfo software and statistical data analysis using SPSS World Vision SL 210,000 Balance carried forward 65,466,519 Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 04 CHA Total Amount Expended Staff Rs. Other Direct Cost Assets Programme Cost Rs. 4,861,202 Programme Management Cost Rs. 961,136 Total Rs. Balance carried forward 1,483,163 – 7,305,501 Nil 1,295,298 3,239,258 1,024,674 5,559,229 Nil 156,462 55,000 211,462 Nil 288,188 18,651 49,080 (9,784) 288,188 18,651 49,080 (9,784) Nil Nil Nil Nil 2,358,306 – 5,532,657 5,427,461 13,318,424 Nil 3,333,148 33,812,850 1,369,770 38,515,768 Nil 210,000 210,000 Nil 8,469,915 – 48,158,563 8,838,041 65,466,519 Nil ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 05 Notes to the Financial Statements Transferred from Restricted Funds Project Nature of Activities carried out Name of Donor Organization B/F+During the year Fund Receipts Rs. 65,466,519 Balance brought forward Human Security Response Project (HSRP) Co-ordination of disaster assistance and promotion of accountability and transparency of humanitarian action. World Vision SL Mercy Corps SL Oxfam GB Save The Children SL CARE International SL Forut Sri Lanka Diakonia American Jewish 1,216,295 1,166,110 51,082,452 22,701 69,200 44,130 17,675,124 2,782,262 IASC Guidelines Workshop Workshop on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support on Emergency Settings' to sensitize ‘donor community, policymakers, Government authorities and the PS’ organizations on the implementation and use of the IASC Guidelines ‘for quality service provision’ Private Donor 526,000 Institutional Capacity Building of the Prison Department (PTP) Reintegration and follow-up programme for ex-detainees in prison British High Commission 170,237 Juvenile Justice Programme Provide a transportation service to children in conflict with the law, address their issues and fulfils identified needs, in the form of provisions, service and mediation P&D Unit 1,549,654 Balance carried forward 141,770,684 Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 06 CHA Total Amount Expended Staff Rs. Other Direct Cost Assets Programme Cost Rs. 48,158,563 Programme Management Cost Rs. 8,838,041 Total Rs. Balance carried forward 8,469,915 – 65,466,519 Nil 261,324 21,211,304 69,200 7,523,618 749,708 507,410 801,606 954,971 1,166,110 14,842,532 22,700 44,130 6,431,737 1,577,854 – – 14,227,010 – – – 3,212,359 454,700 1,216,295 1,166,110 51,082,452 22,700 69,200 44,130 17,675,124 2,782,262 Nil Nil Nil 1 Nil Nil Nil Nil 360,404 165,596 526,000 Nil 170,237 170,237 Nil 880,612 549,580 119,463 1,549,654 Nil 39,165,681 1,309,016 74,278,818 27,017,169 141,770,683 1 ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 07 Notes to the Financial Statements Transferred from Restricted Funds Project Nature of Activities carried out Name of Donor Organization B/F+During the year Fund Receipts Rs. 141,770,684 Balance brought forward JICA Japan NGO Desk 06/07 Collection of information in a comprehensive manner on NGO activities in Sri Lanka to assist in policy and strategic planning for the future JICA Japan International Co-operation Agency 428,099 Key Policy Maker Course (PMC) CHA carried out courses and workshops for Key policy makers in Psychosocial developmental practices Helvetas Sri Lanka 393,417 Landmines Ban Advocacy Forum (LBAF) 06/07 Forum coordination for advocacy regarding the total ban of landmines in the country. United Nations Development Programme The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs 6,835 18,876 Landmines Ban Advocacy Forum Web Page (LBAF-Web page) 06/07 Provision of information to parties who are interested in advocating for a total ban on the use of antipersonnel landmines The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs 5,175 Legal Aid to IDP's in North & East Addressing documentation and other legal issues of IDP and resettled people The Brookings Institute 202,276 Long-Term Strategic Planning Printing Report ‘Report on the Post-tsunami’ context to sensitize Government authorities, donors psychosocial organizations on the suggested plan of action for the psychosocial service provision in Sri Lanka United Nations Population Fund 257,500 Balance carried forward 143,082,862 Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 08 CHA Total Amount Expended Staff Rs. Other Direct Cost Assets Programme Cost Rs. 74,278,818 Programme Management Cost Rs. 27,017,169 Total Rs. Balance carried forward 39,165,681 1,309,016 141,770,683 1 168,188 139,141 120,771 428,099 Nil 343,000 50,417 393,417 Nil 3,385 2,256 3,450 16,620 6,835 18,876 Nil Nil 5,175 5,175 Nil 150,000 52,276 202,276 Nil 237,500 20,000 257,500 Nil 39,483,868 1,309,016 75,009,275 27,280,702 143,082,862 1 ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 09 Notes to the Financial Statements Transferred from Restricted Funds Project Nature of Activities carried out Name of Donor Organization B/F+During the year Fund Receipts Rs. 143,082,862 Address the need for conflict sensitive practices in humanitarian/ emergency assistance, development, corporation and post-tsunami reconstruction efforts in mainstreaming conflict sensitivity approaches in the humanitarian and development sector News letter on national protection and durable solutions for internally displaced persons from conflictinduced and tsunami-induced. Promotion of diversity, human rights and freedom and the provision of equal development opportunities for the community. The World Bank Norwegian Embassy 2,873,053 1,781,933 Balance brought forward Mainstreaming Conflict Sensitivity Newsletters on Displacement The Brookings Institute 2,304,766 Peace and Development Programme (P&D) The Royal Netherlands Embassy Swedish International Development Cooperation Norwegian Embassy The Royal Netherlands Embassy 22,884,998 3,731,405 5,580,584 15,127,583 Protection of Conflict Affected Persons Provide emergency humanitarian interventions for conflict affected persons in North and East Districts Providing core support to district consortia for promotion of human security Provide grants to promote livelihood for tsunami affected and vulnerable people, to increase production and marketing opportunities - Ampara District Provision and mitigation of conflict and promotion of Peace for Sustainable Development in Sri Lanka Providing assistance to restore livelihood of tsunami victims Promotion of Human Security, Core Support for District Consortia Promotion of Livelihood for Tsunami Affected and Vulnerable People The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs MercyCorps SL 5,035,833 4,907,856 Promotion of Peace and Development with Local Capacities in SL (PCF) Promotion of Livelihood for Tsunami Survivors in Sri Lanka Balance carried forward The World Bank (128,816) Diakonia 10,610,957 217,793,014 Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 10 CHA Total Amount Expended Staff Rs. Other Direct Cost Assets Programme Cost Rs. 75,009,275 892,930 884,111 Programme Management Cost Rs. 27,280,702 716,939 500,920 Total Rs. Balance carried forward 39,483,868 1,263,184 396,901 1,309,016 143,082,862 2,873,053 1,781,933 1 Nil Nil 720,970 413,796 1,170,000 2,304,766 Nil 909,093 484,189 35,956 16,961,270 3,247,216 4,978,678 22,884,998 3,731,405 Nil Nil 515,811 3,204,710 659,259 3,111,170 7,785,706 1,953,603 3,477,908 5,580,584 15,127,583 Nil Nil 5,018,334 17,499 5,035,833 Nil 328,901 83,790 4,168,565 326,600 4,907,856 Nil (128,816) (128,816) Nil 49,940 9,903,569 657,449 10,610,957 Nil 47,357,568 2,088,020 127,395,943 40,951,482 217,793,013 1 ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 11 Notes to the Financial Statements Transferred from Restricted Funds Project Nature of Activities carried out Name of Donor Organization B/F+During the year Fund Receipts Rs. 217,793,014 Balance brought forward Psychosocial Forum (PSF) - 06/07 Providing support to psychosocial initiatives in the district and network with the district co-ordinating bodies Norwegian Church Aid 4,892,819 Psychosocial Guidelines Printing Printing and dissemination to obtain broad buy-in to the 'Best Practice Guidelines for Sri Lanka' among Psychosocial service providers, agency leaders, Government ministries and donors United Nations Population Found 1,899,736 Reducing Incidences and Effects of Torture Project Conceptualize the available data and develop a database which can be made available both at Social Policy Analysis and Research Centre, University of Colombo and the Asia Foundation for potential research work The Asia Foundation 378,933 Relief Programme for Conflict Affected IDPs Providing emergency relief support to displaced people or people whose livelihood have been interrupted due to instability in the Northern and Eastern Districts Diakonia 1,666,392 Regional Initiative Sustainable Livelihood and Enabling of Social and Political Participation (RSLSPP) Regional Initiative for Sustainable Livelihood and enabling of Social and Political Participation (RSLSPP) N(o)vib Oxfam Netherlands 11,175,643 Research to Professionalize the Psychosocial Work in Sri Lanka Initiated a research project to structure issues related to psychosocial capacity building in Sri Lanka Helvetas Sri Lanka Christian Children's Fund Inc 1,000,000 254,528 Balance carried forward 239,061,065 Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 12 CHA Total Amount Expended Staff Rs. Other Direct Cost Assets Programme Cost Rs. 127,395,943 Programme Management Cost Rs. 40,951,482 Total Rs. Balance carried forward 47,357,568 2,088,020 217,793,013 1 797,370 80,000 1,997,093 2,018,356 4,892,819 Nil 1,792,202 107,534 1,899,736 Nil 278,083 26,895 24,510 49,445 378,933 Nil 1,666,392 1,666,392 Nil 247,363 8,373 9,652,835 1,267,073 11,175,643 Nil 1,000,000 254,528 1,000,000 254,528 Nil Nil 48,680,384 2,203,287 143,783,502 44,393,890 239,061,064 1 ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 13 Notes to the Financial Statements Transferred from Restricted Funds Project Nature of Activities carried out Name of Donor Organization B/F+During the year Fund Receipts Rs. 239,061,065 Balance brought forward Sphere Standard Sinhala Translation Ensure learning support and capacity building among Humanitarian Sector in relation to Sphere standards. Oxfam GB 298,400 Strengthening Local Capacity for Peace Building Creation of middle level leaders,mobilization to represent grass roots pressure, negotiated settlement with a long-term impact to build local capacities for sustainable 'positive peace' CordAID International 898,637 Strengthening of Regional Psychosocial Network Support the strengthening and development of network for psychosocial sector and coordinate the activities to facilitate the PS programme Helvetas Sri Lanka 613,935 Sustainable Livelihood Development in Sri Lanka Aims to achieve sustainable livelihood to focus on People becoming ‘investors’ not beneficiaries Hambantota District American Jewish 314,616 Total 241,186,653 Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 14 CHA Total Amount Expended Staff Rs. Other Direct Cost Assets Programme Cost Rs. 143,783,502 Programme Management Cost Rs. 44,393,890 Total Rs. Balance carried forward 48,680,384 2,203,287 239,061,064 1 298,400 298,400 Nil 622,171 276,466 898,637 Nil 198,000 241,435 174,500 613,935 Nil 231,330 1,000 82,286 314,616 Nil 49,731,886 2,203,287 144,324,337 44,927,142 241,186,652 1 ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 15 Notes to the Financial Statements 8. REVENUE EARNED FROM OTHER ACTIVITIES 2007 2006 Directory sales/CHA publications Loss on sale of property plant & equipment Grants - Unrestricted funding Subscriptions Other income 331,860 Nil 961,700 2,123,000 4,905,020 8,321,580 53,100 (10,500) 7,218,827 2,571,000 1,375,915 11,208,342 Other income mainly includes CHA printing Rs. 1,615,216/- (2006 - Rs. 539,743/-) and consultancy fee Rs. 1,776,350/- (2006 - Nil). 9. ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES 2007 2006 Rent and rates Maintenance Audit fees Depreciation Other administration cost 4,139,000 3,467,306 450,000 1,707,212 7,847,825 17,611,343 2,546,479 2,193,737 426,842 1,828,526 5,600,862 12,596,446 10. PUBLICITY EXPENSES Printing and advertisements CHA publication 162,382 1,709,138 1,871,520 11. FINANCE INCOME Interest received on unrestricted funds Interest received on restricted funds Exchange gain 5,802,472 10,770,584 10,133 16,583,189 12. TAX The Consortium is liable to pay income tax only on its investment income and on its rent income, since the Consortium received more than three fourths of its gross receipts from its members. The rate applicable is 15%. Accordingly current tax charge consists of income tax at 15% on liable interest income and rent income. 2,067,471 8,321,306 4,333,672 14,722,449 531,482 2,274,575 2,806,057 Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 16 CHA 13. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Motor Office Office Total Vehicle At December 31, 2006 Cost Accumulated depreciation Net book amount 1,725,530 (1,353,706) 371,824 Equipment Furniture 5,991,974 (3,925,146) 2,066,828 1,908,130 (1,269,800) 638,330 9,625,634 (6,548,652) 3,076,982 Year ended December 31, 2007 Opening net book amount Additions Depreciation Closing net book value 371,824 Nil (345,106) 26,718 2,066,828 58,999 (1,037,690) 1,088,137 638,330 48,624 (324,416) 362,538 3,076,982 107,623 (1,707,212) 1,477,393 At December 31, 2007 Cost Accumulated depreciation Net book amount (a) 1,725,530 (1,698,812) 26,718 6,050,973 (4,962,836) 1,088,137 1,956,754 (1,594,216) 362,538 9,733,257 (8,255,864) 1,477,393 Property, plant and equipment include fully depreciated assets the cost of which at December 31, 2007 amounted to Rs. 2,505,246/- (2006 - Rs. 1,920,425/-). (b) Project assets not included in Balance Sheet Balance as at January 1, 2007 Additions during the year Balance as at December 31, 2007 Motor Vehicles Computer equipment Office equipment Furniture and fittings Cost 4,850,000 6,694,991 3,894,900 1,159,926 16,599,817 338,435 1,019,151 374,388 471,313 2,203,287 5,188,435 7,714,142 4,269,288 1,631,239 18,803,104 Report of the Auditors on page 91. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 17 Notes to the Financial Statements 14. RECEIVABLES AND PREPAYMENTS 2007 2006 Receivable from Donors Staff loan Prepayments Cash advances to project activities - Tsunami relief - Health and Livelihood Grants - Americares - Others Other receivables 8,580,437 437,380 2,355,500 3,073,134 Nil 14,983,667 4,244,636 33,674,754 7,744,670 273,730 3,945,349 3,769,439 20,923,675 9,723,451 3,489,714 49,870,028 Other receivables mainly consist of subscription receivable of Rs. 350,000/- (2006 - Rs. 1,017,050/-), refundable deposits of Rs. 1,464,011(2006 - Rs. 1,413,000) and advances given for infrastructure Rs. 229,485/- (2006 - Rs. 258,750/-). 15. INVESTMENT 2007 2006 Ceylinco Shriram - Money Market placement Unit Trust Management - Repurchase agreement Commercial Paper - NDB Commercial Paper - NTB Nil Nil 32,285,772 1,041,355 33,327,127 10,000,000 5,000,000 Nil Nil 15,000,000 16. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS Restricted fund General Fund Cash floats Cash in hand 115,206,801 222,985 74,640 Nil 115,504,426 119,237,853 33,420,086 119,000 513 152,777,452 For the purposes of the cash flow statements, the year-end cash and cash equivalents comprise the following: 2007 2006 Cash at bank and in hand Bank overdraft (Note 18) 115,504,426 (278,686) 115,225,740 152,777,452 (7,331,001) 145,446,451 Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 18 CHA 2007 2006 17. PAYABLES Payable to project suppliers Accruals and provisions Other payables 1,071,463 6,850,979 4,672,296 12,594,738 Other payables mainly consist of staff savings of Rs. 4,624,404 (2006 - Rs. 2,664,712/-). 18. BORROWINGS Bank overdrafts Weighted average effective interest rates Bank overdrafts are secured on deposits. 278,686 11.5% 7,331,001 11.5% 6,020,636 4,198,664 3,266,921 13,486,221 Report of the Auditors on page 91. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 19 Notes to the Financial Statements 19. RESTRICTED FUNDS Name of Donor Organization Project German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) International Medical Health German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) Leonard Cheshire Disabled Resource Centre The Asia Foundation (TAF) Peace and Development unit AcNielsen Berghorf Foundation CordAID International Secours Populaire Francais(SPF) Advisory Services for Conflict Transformation Assisting IDP's with Immediate needs in North & East Building Local Capacities in North and East(BLC) CHA LCI Resource Centre for Disabled (LCI) Capacity Building, Documentation and Advocacy Support Civil Society Peace Tabloid Citizen Demand Survey Civil Society Network on Information Sharing Development of Strategic Framework for Peace Development & Twinning of Schools in Matara District & Dep of Des Hautes_Pyrenees (France) The Danish Development Coorperation Office N(o)vib Oxfam Netherlands Diakonia Asia Regional Office - I Diakonia Asia Regional Office - II Private Donors Diakonia Asia Regional Office German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) Americares World Vision SL Private Donors World Vision SL Mercy Corps SL Oxfam GB Save The Children SL CARE International SL Forut Sri Lanka Diakonia Asia Regional Office American Jewish World Health Organization British High Commission P&D Unit Private Donations Balance carried forward IASC Guidelines workshop Institutional Capacity Building of the Prison Department (PTP) Juvenile Justice Programme Human Security Response Project (HSRP) Environment Disaster Management Programme Facilitating Initiatives for Conflict Transformation(FLICT) Health and Livelihood Grants Programme HRAC Training HRAC Webportal Emergency Assistance to Tsunami Victims in SL (TR) Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 20 CHA Balance Brought forward Fund Balance Receivable from Donors Received/ restricted surplus during the year 750,000 2,203,600 – – – 2,619,205 111,690 1,500,000 – Interest Income Transferred to Funds Income and transferred to Expenditure unrestricted fund Funds Balance Carried forward returned Overspent Balance during receivable carried the year from donors forward – – 5, 576, 8 8 6 – 306,374 – 372,300 – 6,351,725 – – 518,262 – 93,355 – – – – – – – – 200,982 – – 315,007 1,206,726 2,203,582 – – 229,846 2,658,597 483,990 522,760 5,559,229 – – – – – – – – – – – 5,576,885 – 76,529 – – – – 456,726 – – 518,262 – – – – – – 18 1 – (0) 68,235 – 977,240 1,107,503 78,002 338,373 18,652 49,080 382,863 33,886 10,477,374 – 42,575,107 – – 1,216,295 1,166,853 16,994,614 22,701 69,200 44,130 1,339,249 104,400 – 1,617,065 – – 89,135,131 – – – – – – – 256,343 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 867,960 165,413 – – – – – 24,359,409 289,343 1,869,289 210,000 1,000,000 – – 46,101,206 – – – 16,428,755 2,701,128 526,000 – 1,642,621 482,500 102,960,160 – – – – – – 1,830,528 – 1,584,610 – – – 169,516 1,214,959 – – – 209,142 18,912 – – – – 5,543,657 211,462 288,188 18,651 49,080 (9,784) – 13,318,424 – 38,515,768 210,000 – 1,216,295 1,166,110 51,082,452 22,700 69,200 44,130 17,675,124 2,782,262 526,000 170,237 1,549,654 – 141,770,684 – – – – – – – (33,000) – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – (33,000) – 50,185 – – – – – – 7,460,698 – – – 170,259 – – – – – – – – – – 13,334,556 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 974,988 31,953 – 1 0 392,647 33,886 23,348,889 0 52,540 – 1,000,000 0 0 13,228,327 1 (0) 0 302,023 42,178 (0) 1,446,828 92,967 482,500 42,607,736 ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 21 Notes to the Financial Statements Name of Donor Organization Project Balance brought forward The Brookings Institute The Brookings Institute JICA Japan International Cooperation Agency JICA Japan International Cooperation Agency Helvetas Sri Lanka United Nations Development Programme United Nations Children's Fund The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs United Nations Development Programme The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs United Nations Development Programme United Nations Childrens Fund The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs The Brookings Institute United Nations Population Fund The World Bank Norwegian Embassy The Brookings Institute International Development Research Centre The Government of the Netherlands The Government of Ausralia The Danish Development Coorperation Office Swedish International Development Cooperation Norwegian Embassy Other The Brookings Institute The Government of the Netherlands CordAID International The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs Mercy Corps SL Diakonia Asia Regional Office The World Bank Norwegian Church Aid United Nations Population Fund The Asia Foundation Helvetas Sri Lanka Christian Children's Fund Inc N(o)vib Oxfam Netherlands Diakonia Asia Regional Office Oxfam GB CordAID International Helvetas Sri Lanka American Jewish United Nations Development Programme Regional Initiative Sustainable Livelihood and Enabling of Social & Political Participation (RSLSPP) Relief Programme for Conflict Affected IDP's Sphere Standard Sinhala Translation Strengthening Local Capacity for Peace Building Strengthening of Regional Psychosocial Network Sustainable Livelihood Development in Sri Lanka Workshop on Conflict Resolution, Reconciliation and Peace Process Practitioners Kit For Return, Resettlement, Rehabilitation and Development 2004 Protection of Conflict Affected Persons Promotion and Reconciliation of Peace Building In SL Promotion of Human Security, Core Support for District Consortia Promotion of Livelihood for Tsunami Affected and Vulnerable People Promotion of Livelihood for Tsunami Survivors in Sri Lanka Promotion of Peace and Development with Local Capacities in SL (PCF) Psychosocial Forum (PSF)-06/07 Psychosocial Guidelines Printing Reducing Incidences and Effects of Torture Project Research to Professionalize the Psychosocial Work in Sri Lanka Peace and Development Programme (P&D) Newsletters on Displacement Peace and Conflict Impact Assessment (PCIA) Landmines Ban Advocacy Forum Web Page (LBAF-Web page) - 05/06 Landmines Ban Advocacy Forum Web Page (LBAF-Web page) - 06/07 Landmines Ban Advocacy Forum Web Page (LBAF-Web page) - 07/08 Landmine Ban District Forum Landmine Monitoring Report Launch 2006 Legal Aid to IDP's in North & East Long-Term Strategic Planning Printing Report Mainstreaming Conflict Sensitivity Landmines Ban Advocacy Forum (LBAF) - 06/07 IDP Framework Booklet IDP Research Project JICA Japan NGO Desk - 05/06 JICA Japan NGO Desk - 06/07 Key Policy Maker Course (PMC) Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 22 CHA Balance brought forward Receivable from Donors Received/ restricted surplus during the year 102,960,160 – – – 723,203 – – – – – – 254,500 – – 551,932 103,000 – 2,814,000 2,192,692 – – – – – – – – 76,449,770 – 8,283,888 4,706,950 – – 2,710,695 759,910 544,000 1,000,000 996,035 – – – 7,151,696 1,400,000 2,778,582 – 216,381,013 Interest Income Transferred to Income and Expenditure Funds transferred from/(to) unrestricted fund (33,000) – – – – – (137,997) 137,997 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – Funds Overspent returned receivable during from donors the year Balance carried forward 89,135,131 – – – 0 527,744 212,187 – 45,711 22,500 1 58,785 – 1,034,490 40,495 – – – – 1 36,786 – 23,261,660 258,516 2,393,062 12,012,450 5,474,145 18,939 404,214 – – – – 1 0,480,385 1 ,968,689 1 ,854,358 – – – – 12,778,371 1 ,666,391 299,412 – – – 1 25,000 164,309,422 867,960 3,006 4,912 400 295,103 – – 137,997 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 796,981 5,638,311 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 7,744,670 5,543,657 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – 1,013,580 – – 609,169 285,889 – – 2,557,775 – – 26,219 131,568 – 260,140 – – – – 342,589 – – – – – – 10,770,584 141,770,684 – – – 428,099 393,417 6,835 – 18,876 – 5,175 – – – 202,276 257,500 2,873,053 1,781,933 2,304,766 – 22,884,998 – – 3,731,405 5,580,584 – – 15,127,583 – 5,035,833 4,907,856 10,610,957 (128,816) 4,892,819 1,899,736 378,933 1,000,000 254,528 11,175,643 1,666,392 298,400 898,637 613,935 314,616 – 241,186,654 13,334,556 – – – – – – – – – – – 1,034,490 – – – – – – – – – 2,393,262 – – – – 974,988 3,006 4,912 400 – – – – – – – – – – – 154,500 2,873,053 – – – – 200 – – – – – 796,981 2,390,256 174,688 – – 67,626 1,139,827 – – – – – – – – – – 42,607,736 – – 0 134,327 67,355 – 26,835 22,500 153,610 254,500 – 40,495 349,657 – – 1,032,067 24,713 1,390,242 258,516 (0) 8,890,214 179,450 18,939 404,214 63,879,961 – 0 0 997 2,097,505 (0) – 165,067 – 741,507 1,945,317 (1) (0) 6,253,059 786,065 2,463,966 125,000 – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – (33,000) – – – – – – – – – – – – – 1,012 – – – – 16,763,320 8,580,437 134,313,812 ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 23 Notes to the Financial Statements 20. DEFINED BENEFIT OBLIGATIONS 2007 2006 At beginning of year Charge for the year Payments At end of year 21. CONTINGENT LIABILITIES 2,690,270 1,818,870 Nil 4,509,140 1,203,613 1,576,657 (90,000) 2,690,270 The Commissioner General of Inland Revenue has furnished an assessment for income tax for the financial year 2005 in terms of Section 96 of the Inland Revenue Act No. 38 of 2000 for an amount of Rs. 1,786,038/-. The Consortium has filed an Appeal against this assessment on December 19, 2007 and the out come of this is still pending as at the balance sheet date. Except for the above, there were no material contingent liabilities at the balance sheet date. 22. COMMITMENTS Financial Commitments At the balance sheet date the Consortium had a monthly commitment to pay Rs. 210,000/- as operating lease rental for premises it occupies. 23. CASH GENERATED FROM OPERATIONS Reconciliation of excess of income over expenditure to cash generated from/(used in) operations: 2007 2006 Excess of income over expenditure before tax Adjustments for: Depreciation (Note 13) Interest income Loss on disposal (Note 8) Changes in working capital - Receivables and prepayment - Payables Defined benefit obligations (Note 20) Cash generated from/(used in) operations 24. RESTRICTION ON DISTRIBUTION OF FUNDS 5,229,322 1,707,212 (4,733,680) Nil 17,031,041 (891,483) 1,818,870 20,161,282 9,624,829 1,828,526 (2,038,881) 10,500 (29,654,639) 7,312,980 1,576,657 (11,340,028) The income and property of the Consortium cannot be paid to or transferred directly or indirectly by way of dividends, bonus or otherwise howsoever by way of profit to the members of the Consortium in accordance with Clause 4 to the Memorandum of Association of the Consortium. Under these circumstances the ‘Earnings per Share’ has not been computed as required by Sri Lanka Accounting Standard No. 34 - Earnings per Share. Report of the Auditors on page 91. 1 24 CHA 25. DIRECTOR'S INTEREST IN CONTRACTS No Director of the Consortium had any direct or indirect contract with the Consortium during the year ended December 31, 2007. 26. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTION As explained in Note 25 above there were no related party transactions during the year ended December 31, 2007. 27. POST BALANCE SHEET EVENTS No events have occurred since the balance sheet date which would require adjustments to, or disclosure in the financial statements. Report of the Auditors on page 91. ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 25 Notes 1 26 CHA ANNUAL REPORT 2007 1 27 Notes 1 28 CHA Corporate Information N ame Consortium of Humanitarian Agencies (Gte.) Limited Legal Form The Consortium of Humanitarian Agencies (Gte.) Limited is registered under the Companies Act No. 17 of 1982 Registration No. CN (P.BG) 273 Registration with Social Services The Consortium of Humanitarian Agencies (CHA) is registered under the Voluntary Social Services Organisations (Registration and Supervision) Act No. 31 of 1980 as amended by Act No. 8 of 1998 Registration No. L. 00606 Tax Payer Identification Number (TIN) 409079202 0000 Secretaries Messrs. FJ & G De Saram 261, De Saram Place, Colombo 10 Auditors PricewaterhouseCoopers, P. O. Box 918, 100, Braybrooke Place, Colombo 2 Bankers Commercial Bank of Ceylon Nations Trust Bank Hatton National Bank Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Registered Office Consortium of Humanitarian Agencies (CHA), 86, Rosmead Place, Colombo 7. Donors The Government of the Netherlands Diakonia Asia Regional Office N(o)vib Oxfam Netherlands Oxfam GB The World Bank Norwegian Embassy CordAID International German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) United Nations Development Programme United Nations Children's Fund World Health Organization Secours Populaire Francais (SPF) The Danish Development Coorperation Office World Vision SL Mercy Corps SL Save The Children SL CARE International SL Forut Sri Lanka American Jewish Joint Contribution Inc The Berghof Foundation British High Commission The Brookings Institute JICA Japan International Cooperation Agency Helvetas Sri Lanka The Swiss Federal Development of Foreign Affairs United Nations Population Fund International Development Research Centre The Government of Ausralia The Danish Development Coorperation Office Swedish International Development Cooperation Norwegian Church Aid Printed by: Printel (Pvt) Ltd. Christian Children's Fund Inc Development Alternative Inc. USAID International Medical Health Leonard Cheshire Disabled Resource Centre The Asia Foundation (TAF) Americares AcNielsen Subcribers Produced by: Smart Media ...
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