LEC8&9_10_stratification

LEC8&9_10_stratification - SOC101Y...

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Introduction to Sociology Introduction to Sociology Professor Robert Brym Professor Robert Brym Lecture #8 Lecture #8 Social Stratification Social Stratification 17 Nov 10 17 Nov 10 SOC101Y SOC101Y
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Survivors of the Titanic Disaster by  Survivors of the Titanic Disaster by  Class, 1912 (percent) Class, 1912 (percent) First  class Second  class Third  class Crew Children 100 100 34.2 n.a. Women 97.2 86.0 46.1 n.a. Men 32.6 8.3 16.2 21.7 Total 62.5 41.4 25.2 21.7
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The Functional Theory of  The Functional Theory of  Stratification Stratification Some jobs are more important than  others. Jobs that are more important require more  training and sacrifice. To motivate talented people to undergo  training and sacrifice, high rewards must  be offered. Therefore, stratification is necessary; it  performs a useful function.
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Attack of the  Attack of the  Class-Specific Killer Virus Class-Specific Killer Virus CASE 1 CASE 2
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Criticisms of the Functional  Criticisms of the Functional  Theory of Stratification Theory of Stratification The question of which occupations are  more important is far from clear. The functional theory ignores the pool of  talent that lies unused because of  inequality. The functional theory fails to examine how  advantages and disadvantages are  passed from generation to generation.
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World Rank World Rank Surname Surname $ US bil. $ US bil. Source Source 24 Thomson 13.0 Publishing 98 Weston 5.0 Retail food 146 Irving 3.9 Oil refining, etc. 246 Desmarais 2.6 Fin. serv., comm.  261 Laliberté 2.5 Entertainment 261 Sherman 2.5 Pharmaceuticals 318 Azrieli 2.1 Real estate 318 Miller 2.1 Electronics 318 Pattison 2.1 Advertising, etc. 334 McCain 2.0 Food processing 397 Bronfman 1.8 Liquor 397 Skoll 1.8 Internet 397 Lazaridis 1.8 Electronics 430 Balsillie 1.7 Electronics 468 Katz 1.5 Pharmacies 559 Saputo 1.3 Dairy 559 Schnaider 1.3 Steel, etc. 601 Jarislowsky 1.2 Finance 647 Cheriton 1.1 Internet 701 Lee-Chin 1.0 Finance Canada’s Billionaires, 2009 Substantial  inheritance Advantages Rags to  riches
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Marx’s Theory of Stratification Marx’s Theory of Stratification The ability of capitalists to hire and fire wage workers  at first encouraged rapid technological change and  economic growth. The drive for profits also caused capitalists to  concentrate many workers, keep wages low, and  spend little on improving working conditions. The result: class polarization, the growth of class  consciousness and working-class organizations, and a  growing demand on the part of workers to end  capitalist exploitation. Because capitalism could produce more than workers 
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2011 for the course SYG 2000 taught by Professor Joos during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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LEC8&9_10_stratification - SOC101Y...

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