LEC17(09)politics - SOC101Y Introduction to Sociology...

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Unformatted text preview: SOC101Y Introduction to Sociology Introduction to Sociology Professor Robert Brym Professor Robert Brym Lecture #17 Lecture #17 Politics and Social Movements Politics and Social Movements 3 March 2010 3 March 2010 Pluralist theory Pluralist theory Pluralists argue that democracies are heterogeneous societies with many competing interests and centres of power, none of which can consistently dominate. Because no one group of people is always able to control the political agenda or the outcome of political conflicts, democracy is guaranteed. They pay little attention to differences in political influence due to persistent power differences. Elite theory Elite theory Elite theorists have established the existence of large, persistent, wealth- based inequalities in political influence and political participation. They pay little attention to how political parties lose office while other political parties get elected. Voter Turnout, Voter Turnout, Canadian Federal Elections Canadian Federal Elections 35 45 55 65 75 85 1958 1963 1968 1974 1980 1988 1997 2004 2008 Voters as percent of eligible voters Voter turnout fell 21.5 percent from 1958 to 2008 and will drop below 50 percent in 2027 if current trends continue. 20.5-24 25 - 34 35 - 44 45 - 54 55 - 64 65 - 74 >= 75 Year Age Cohort Voter turnout is falling mainly because fewer young people vote than in the past. As these 2008 data show, the youngest Canadians are the least likely to vote. Voters as percent of eligible voters Federal Political Contributors, by Federal Political Contributors, by Income and Region, Canada, 1988 Income and Region, Canada, 1988 300 600 900 1200 Atlantic Quebec Ontario West Canada <$25K $25<$50K $50<$75K $75K+ Contributors/10,000 tax filers Income category Region Political Apathy and Cynicism, by Political Apathy and Cynicism, by Annual Household Income, Canada, Annual Household Income, Canada, 2004 2004 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% <$30,000 $30,000 to $70,000 more than $70,000 Government doesn't care about people like me Low Interest in Election Didn't Vote LEFT LEFT RIGHT RIGHT Supports extensive government involvement in the economy; a strong social safety net of health, education and welfare benefits to help the...
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LEC17(09)politics - SOC101Y Introduction to Sociology...

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