Chapter 3 Lecture - Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing 2005 Part 3 Measurement Chapter 3 The Theory of Measurement Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing

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Unformatted text preview: Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Part 3 Measurement Chapter 3 The Theory of Measurement Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Measurement • The process of observing and recording the observations that are collected as part of a research effort • Construct validity/measurement validity • Threats to measurement validity • Reliability and measurement error • Levels of measurement Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Construct Validity In its broadest sense, construct validity can be thought of as more than measurement validity. Construct validity is the approximate truth of the conclusion that your operationalization accurately reflects its constructs. Central questions to ask are: “Is your operationalization an accurate translation of the construct?” “Does your program/treatment accurately reflect what you intended?” “Does your sample accurately represent your idea of the population of interest?” “Are you measuring what you intended to measure?” Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 The Idea of Construct Validity Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Measurement Validity Types Construct Validity • Translation validity Face Validity Content Validity • Criterion-related Validity Predictive Validity Concurrent Validity Convergent Validity Discriminant Validity Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Measurement Validity Types Translation Validity • Focuses on whether the operationalization (i.e., measure) is a good translation of the construct • Face Validity : On its face, does the operationalization look like a good translation of the construct? Weakest way to demonstrate construct validity Improved with “expert judgment” Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Measurement Validity Types Translation Validity (cont’d) • Content Validity : Operationalization is checked against the relevant content domain for the construct May be difficult to determine all of the characteristics that constitute the domain A systematic check of the operationalization against the content domain increases rigor Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Measurement Validity Types Criterion-related Validity • The performance of your operationalization (i.e., measure) is checked against some criterion. • A prediction of how the operationalization will perform on some other measure based on your theory or construct • Validating a measure based on its relationship to another independent measure Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Measurement Validity Types Criterion-related Validity (cont’d) • Predictive Validity : Operationalization’s ability to predict something it should theoretically be able to predict Demonstrated by a high correlation between your measure and the criterion measure e.g., Is SAT score able to predict success in college (i.e., college gpa)? Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Measurement Validity Types Criterion-related Validity (cont’d)...
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2011 for the course CHFD 5110 taught by Professor Johnson during the Spring '11 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Chapter 3 Lecture - Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing 2005 Part 3 Measurement Chapter 3 The Theory of Measurement Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing

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