Chapter 11 Lecture - Part 5 Analysis Chapter 11 Analysis...

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Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Part 5 Analysis Chapter 11 Analysis
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Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Analysis Data preparation Descriptive statistics to describe basic features of the data Statistical analysis of the research design to test hypotheses
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Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Conclusion Validity Conclusion validity —the degree to which conclusions you reach about relationships in your data are reasonable.
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Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Conclusion Validity Relevant in quantitative and qualitative research An issue whenever you are talking about a relationship Only concerned with whether there is a relationship (contrasted with internal validity, which is concerned with whether or not a relationship is causal ) It is possible to have conclusion validity (there is a relationship) but not internal validity (i.e., the relationship is caused by something other than the treatment)
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Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Threats to Conclusion Validity Two kinds of errors about relationships: Type I Error —concluding that there is a relationship when in fact there is not Type II Error —concluding that there is no relationship when in fact there is Often caused by violation of assumptions of statistical analyses
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Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Threats to Conclusion Validity Type I Error: Finding a Relationship When There Is Not One The 0.05 level of significance ( alpha level ) means that results are expected to happen 5 times out of a hundred simply by chance A major assumption underlying most statistical analyses is that each analysis is independent of the others Fishing and the error rate problem occurs when multiple analyses are done on the same data in the same study Alpha level must be adjusted to account for multiple analyses in order to avoid Type I error
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Copyright Atomic Dog Publishing, 2005 Threats to Conclusion Validity Type II Error: Finding No Relationship When There Is One “Signal-to-noise” ratio when “noise” is too great to see the “signal” “Signal-to-noise” ratio is called
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2011 for the course CHFD 5110 taught by Professor Johnson during the Spring '11 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Chapter 11 Lecture - Part 5 Analysis Chapter 11 Analysis...

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