CHFD 3010 Chapter 5

CHFD 3010 Chapter 5 - Click to edit Master subtitle style...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style Chapter 5 Gender Issues Sex and Gender Sex: biological maleness and femaleness Genetic: determined by chromosomes Anatomical: external characteristics of male and female Gender Psychosocial meaning of maleness and femaleness Gender Identity Subjective sense of being male or female Gender (Sex) Role Cultural norms for male and female behavior Sex and Gender Gender Assumptions Assumptions about how people are likely to behave based on their maleness or femaleness  Important part of social interaction  Identify others as being same sex or other sex (relative to ourselves) Unsure about identifying someones gender?  Many people experience great discomfort when interacting with a person whose gender is ambiguous Why do you think this is? Gender Identity Information Gender as a Biological Process Biological sex determined at conception by the chromosomal make up of sperm that fertilizes the ovum  Reproductive cells have 22 matched chromosomes  Autosomes : the almost identical matched sets of chromosomes  Sex chromosomes: the 23rd pair of chromosomes XX is female XY is male Gonadal Sex Differentiation occurs around 6 weeks post-conception In the first couple weeks following conception, gonads are the same in males and females Gonads: the male and female sex glands: ovaries and testes  SRY gene in male fetus triggers transformation into testes  DSS on female gene triggers tissue to develop into ovaries  6 week old fetus: Differentiation of Gonads Wolffian ducts @ Vas deferens, seminal vesicles, and ejaculatory ducts by stimulation of adrogens Mllerian ducts @ in the anbsence of androgens, develop into fallopian tubes, uterus, and inner third of vagina Hormonal Sex Ovaries produce: Estrogens  Most important: Estradiol  Influence development of secondary sexual characteristics  Regulate menstrual cycle Progestational Compounds  Only Progesterone seems to be of physiological importance Regulates menstrual cycle Stimulates development of uterine lining in preparation for pregnancy Testes produce: Androgens  Most important: Testosterone Sex of External Genitals Depending on the presence or absence of testosterone determines whether the tissues will develop into male or female Sex of External Genitals Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) Stimulates labioscrotal swelling to become the scrotum and the genital tubercle and genital folds to differentiate into the glans and shaft of the penis (respectively) Genital folds fuse around urethra to form the shaft, & the two sides of the labioscrotal swelling fuse to form the scrotum Sex of External Genitals...
View Full Document

Page1 / 50

CHFD 3010 Chapter 5 - Click to edit Master subtitle style...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online