AC 209 Final Exam Study Guide

AC 209 Final Exam Study Guide - Study Guide: 1.

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Study Guide: 1. “America has never been without popular culture and popular music” has been  one of our recurring mantras this semester.  What does this mean to you?  What  forms of popular culture were brought here by the earliest European settlers?  Where did they get their popular music/culture from (while they were still in  Europe)?  What might all this really say about what popular music is and where it  comes from? Meaning: Culture is fluid, a system of meanings and medium for understanding hybridity Belongs to any number of musical styles or genres Accessible to the general public and mostly distributed commercially Not a product of one single group, race, form, or category (not monolithic) Like America, popular music is a collection of various influences, styles, ethnicities, thoughts, feelings, and art forms All of these subcultures feed off of, imitate, work together with, and converge with each other to form the popular music that dominates each respective era Earliest forms: American popular culture largely Eurocentric European settlers brought sheet music, song books , Ballad traditions, Operas, dance music Later immigrants followed with more ethnic musical and religious traditions (Jews, Italians, etc.) Syncretism – blending of African and European traditions
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African American Slave culture created traditions based in Senegal/Gambia (plucked strings), Wolof (call and response), Coastal (polyrhythm) Latin American stream – haberna, tango, mambo, salsa, etc. Impact: Popular music’s diverse origins demonstrate that it is not specific to one group or race or ethnicity, but based in cultural differences blended together. Influenced by class status, hardships, religious undertones, and political differences Popular music doesn’t come from everywhere, a mix of cultures only made possible by the unique blend of race and ethnicity that developed in early America. 2. Another of our common mantras is that “no one group, race, or people retain sole  ownership over any style of music.”  What does this mean and give two (2)  examples of how we can see this in popular music (and be specific and give  context and content). Meaning: a. In the history of American popular culture, so much of the music was influenced, imitated, or contained shades of other styles, cultures, eras, and patterns b. Even the first to make music popular in America were influenced by European earlier generations, African heritage, etc. c. The inherent nature of popular music is that it appeals to and speaks to all different cultures and tastes, and can be shared across social barriers commercially or not Example 1:
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Origins of Race Records/The Blues Sophie Tucker, a white female original sang “Negro songs”, but songwriter Perry Bradford suggest that Mamie Smith replace Sophie
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AC 209 Final Exam Study Guide - Study Guide: 1.

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