Tips%20for%20Studying

Tips%20for%20Studying - Tips for Studying or How to Beat...

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Tips for Studying – or How to Beat the Curve Many students have asked how to study. Here is some studying advice that might help on quizzes and exams. First off, you need to know that it is rarely sufficient in science to memorize facts. Rather, for the rest of your careers (assuming you will use your degree) you will need to apply things you have learned to analyze problems you have not seen before. So each thing you learn should become part of a mental "tool kit" that you can access when you see a new problem. A big part of learning is knowing how to find the right tool to use. I have found it convenient to mentally place the tools into "mailboxes" or "pigeonholes" for future reference. Educators call this “concept mapping.” For example, you should have a “mailbox” from Chem 115 called “solutions,” in which should be the tools you need to calculate molarity, weight percent, freezing point depression, etc. You would need to be able to link (mentally) to another “mailbox” called “algebra” to be able to solve the molarity problems. Early in this course, you will develop a “mailbox” called "translation" in which are folders called "mRNA structure,"  "tRNA," "ribosomes," etc.  Later, you will add a file called "antibiotics that affect translation" to  the "ribosome" folder in your translation mailbox, since many antibiotics affect the structure of 
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Tips%20for%20Studying - Tips for Studying or How to Beat...

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