g2 - mean good weather CUMULONIMBUS Dark towering clouds...

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When water vapor in the air becomes liquid water or ice crystals. How do clouds form?
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FOG A cloud in contact with the ground.
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STRATUS Sheets of low, grey clouds that bring light snow, rain, or drizzle.
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NIMBOSTRATUS Thicker layer than stratus clouds that completely block out the sun. They cause steady rain or snow.
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CUMULUS White and puffy clouds that usually
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Unformatted text preview: mean good weather. CUMULONIMBUS Dark, towering clouds that are also called “thunderheads”. These clouds produce heavy rain, thunder, and lighting. CIRRUS Thin, featherlike clouds that are made of ice crystals high in the atmosphere. Usually means a change in the weather is coming....
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2011 for the course GEO 2200 taught by Professor Wolf during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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g2 - mean good weather CUMULONIMBUS Dark towering clouds...

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