HeatandTemperature Lab

HeatandTemperature Lab - Core2,HeatandTemperature 28 Heat...

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Core 2, Heat and Temperature 28                                                 Heat  and  Temperature 100 degrees in New York, 105 degrees in Dallas, 115 degrees in Phoenix. We all  know how hot it can be in our cities, and we all know that we measure heat by  temperature. But is temperature the only factor involved in measuring heat? Are heat and  temperature just synonyms for each other? And what exactly is heat anyway; is it a thing  we can touch or do we just talk about it that way (i.e. “The heat is killing me” or “my  room keeps the heat in too much”)? In this activity you will find that there is a richness  to these words that you might not realize. As physical scientists (as chemistry and  physics students), you will take an extraordinarily obvious qualitative relationship and  then experimentally determine the quantitative relationship that must exist between heat  and temperature. So let’s get hot and explore these concepts and their relationship.
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Core 2, Heat and Temperature 29                                                 FOCUS QUESTION : What is the mathematical relationship  between heat absorbed by a substance  and the temperature rise of the substance? First, Last and Always 1. An important law of the chemistry lab is: “Hot glassware looks the same as  glassware at room temperature.” In other words, be careful about burning  yourself on objects that you might think are safe to touch. 2. Corn oil will be collected in a labeled beaker under the hood for recycling.     corn oil A Pre-Lab Checklist Complete the Warm-Up Activity.  Make Photocopy of Warm-Up to hand in.
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30 Core 2, Heat and Temperature                                  Summarize or Flow Diagram Procedure. Make Photocopy of Summary to hand in.      Warm-Up: Since we all have ideas about how nature works, it is a good idea to express  them to see if they are correct. Below is your chance to tell me what you know  and what you don’t know. If you don’t know, then write “I don’t know.” You  will be graded on completing the warm-up not on the number of correct  responses. 1) What functional  relationship do you expect between quantity of heat  delivered and the length of time the heat is being delivered. (Do you expect the  relationship to be directly proportional, proportional, inversely proportional, or  some other relationship. You do not  have to know the right answer here--just  think about it and write down what you think seems reasonable.) 2) What functional
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2011 for the course CHEM 112 taught by Professor Donnamcgregor during the Spring '11 term at CUNY Hunter.

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HeatandTemperature Lab - Core2,HeatandTemperature 28 Heat...

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