Chapter 5 - Chapter 5: The Primates Human and Apes are...

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Chapter 5: The Primates Human and Apes are Hominoids—they are more closely related than either is to the monkey Homologies: similarities used to assign organisms to the same taxon Analogies: if species experince similar selective forces and adapt to them in similar ways Anthropoids: monkeys, apes, and humans Prosimians: lemurs, lorises, and tarsiers are the more distant relatives of humans than are monkeys and apes Grasping: Primates have 5-digited feet and hands for grasping Flexible hands and feet were important in the early primate’s life Opposable thumbs— the thumb can touch the other finger— was favored for insect eating Humans eliminated the apes foot grabbing ability Smell to Sight Monkeys apes and humans have excellent ability to see depth and color and vision There was several anatomical changes that reflected the shift of importance of smell to that of sight Nose To Hand Sensations of touch also provide info The main touch organ in primates is the hand, specifically the
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Chapter 5 - Chapter 5: The Primates Human and Apes are...

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