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Nov24 - Lexical Access in Comprehension(word recognition...

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Lexical Access in Comprehension (word recognition) Lexical Ambiguity Syntactic ambiguity Same question about mental architecture Bottom Top
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Automatic Processes Fast Do not require attention Feed-forward (can’t be guided, controlled, or stopped midstream) Not subject to top-down feedback? (informational encapsulation)
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Lexical ambiguity They all rose. (FLOWER, STAND) They saw the rose. (FLOWER STAND) Everyone went to the ball. (DANCE, BOUNCE) Everyone played with the ball. (DANCE, BOUNCE) Do we access both meanings, or just the appropriate one? Does frequency matter?
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We know from intuition that we usually resolve lexical ambiguities w/o awareness. When the national anthem played, they all rose. What is the role of context? How quickly? If there is a period of processing in which lexical access is unaffected by high-level knowledge, it must be brief. Need “on-line” measure.
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Present sentence containing ambiguous word auditorally At offset of ambiguous word, present visual target. Collect RT for Naming or LDT Vary timing to tap word recognition at various stages. Initial work done by Conrad, Swinney, & Tanenhaus (separately) in 1970’s
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Experiment 3 : Syntactic Context 0 200 They bought a rose. (FLOWER) 536* 516* They bought a shirt. (FLOWER) 553 527 They all rose. (FLOWER) 541* 534 They all stood. (FLOWER) 553 531
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If a word has two meanings, that differ in frequency… Most frequent meaning is always accessed Less frequent meaning is accessed only if context requires it
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Syntactic Category
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