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lecture+14 - Women, Culture, and Society Class 14 Wages and...

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Women, Culture, and Society Class 14 Wages and Employment
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Organization 1. Background: U.S. Data on Male and Female Earnings 2. Background: Evolution of Equal Pay and Equal Opportunity Legislation in the U.S. 3. Readings by Brown and Sidhu 4. Discussion questions
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U.S. Data on Male and Female Earnings Next table compares median earnings for year-round full-time workers (at least 35 hours a week and at least 50 weeks in a year; paid vacations count as work weeks). Median is a better measure than the mean for this purpose, because it is less affected by very high incomes, and thus better represents the status of a typical person. Relative earnings (female/male earnings) are lower for white women and Asian/Pacific Islanders, than for black and Hispanic women. Note: data use census categories; well-recognized problems with this categories. Whites and Asian-Pacific Islanders earn far more than Blacks and Hispanics, and this is true for both men and women. ASK: For ALL working men and women, would gender gap be larger or smaller?
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U.S. Data on Male and Female Earnings Answer: gap would be larger, because more women work part-time or part-year than men. In 2001, 58% of working women worked Year-Round-
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Gottlieb during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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lecture+14 - Women, Culture, and Society Class 14 Wages and...

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