lecture+6 - Women, Culture, and Society Class 6 Key...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Women, Culture, and Society Class 6 Key Documents and Events
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Organization 1. Introduction 2. Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions Historical Backdrop Authors of the Document 3. The Combahee River Collective Statement Historical Backdrop Authors of the Document
Background image of page 2
Introduction 1. Objective in this section of the course: examine feminism as a social and political movement. 2. Today: examine 2 documents that outline different women’s visions for political, economic, and social changes from distinct historical moments in the development of feminism. 3. Each document analyzes reasons for women’s inequality and suggests how to improve women’s lives. 4. Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions marks what is commonly considered the beginning of an organized women’s rights movement in the U.S. Declaration of Independence used as a model for this Seneca Falls Declaration. 5. Combahee River Collective Statement (1977) is a manifestation of feminist activity during the 1970s.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions 1. Historical Backdrop Declaration signed at the first American women's rights convention held in 1848 at Seneca Falls, NY. Contained first formal call for women’s right to vote. Convention delegates adopted this declaration as a platform calling for a broad range of social, economic, legal, and political reforms to boost the status of women in American life. The demand for women's right to vote (called “woman suffrage”) was the most controversial reform proposed at the convention. Women’s movement fought 72 years to gain the right to vote (achieved in 1920 with the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment guaranteeing women's right to vote).
Background image of page 4
Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions 1. Historical Backdrop This struggle encompassed the lives of several generations of
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/13/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Gottlieb during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 11

lecture+6 - Women, Culture, and Society Class 6 Key...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online