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lecture+4 - Women Culture and Society Class 4 Eating...

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Women, Culture, and Society Class 4 Eating Disorders
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Organization 1. Introduce Reading and Author 2. Motivation 3. A Feminist Approach 4. Discussion of Anorexia 5. Discussion of Bulimia 6. Psychological Distress and Social Values
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Introduce Reading and Author “The Continuum: Anorexia, Bulimia, and Weight Preoccupation” Originally published in edited volume in 1993 By Catrina Brown Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Dalhousie University, Canada Also in Women’s Studies and nursing at Dalhousie Also a feminist psychotherapist in private practice Conducts research in the area of women, depression, eating disorders, trauma and sexual abuse, and alcohol use problems. 2001 PhD in social work.
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Motivation 1. Dieting and weight control have become an accepted way of life 2. Focus of article is women; many of the arguments apply to men (to a lesser extent) 3. Anorexia (self-starvation) and bulimia (binging and purging) are the extremes of a continuum of weight preoccupation among women in affluent Western societies. 4. Discuss sample statistics for prevalence of weight preoccupation. 5. Weight-preoccupation continuum includes fear of fatness, denial of appetite, exaggeration of body size, depression, emotional eating, and rigid dieting. Only a matter of degree separates those women who diet, work out, and obsess about their body shape and calorie intake from the more extreme behaviors of anorexia and bulimia.
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A Feminist Approach 1. A feminist approach to eating disorders and weight preoccupation recognizes how the conditions of women’s lives shape their experience with weight and eating.
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