09CivilRights_bw_ - American Government Lecture 9 Civil Rights Eagleton Lecture Wednesday February 17 5pm Lona Valmoro Special Assistant to Sec of

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American Government Lecture 9 - Civil Rights
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Eagleton Lecture Wednesday, February 17, 5pm Lona Valmoro Special Assistant to Sec. of State Clinton 6:30 reception Thursday, February 18 Exam I 50 multiple choice
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Civil Rights The opposite of a liberty Liberty is a restriction of government action Right is requirement for government action To protect a minority – Democracy = Majority Rule American Democracy = “Majority Rule, but Minority Rights” – Protects minorities from being abused by majorities To correct a wrongful action When one group is systematically harmed over a period of time, eliminating the cause of harm does not create equality Tend to expand over time Involve role of government in assuring “equal opportunity and application of the law” Civil Rights don’t disappear New groups are found
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Civil Rights Two major Civil Rights movements African-Americans Women Many smaller movements Disabled Elderly Native Americans Immigrants • Asians • Latinos • Irish Homosexuals
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Slavery Global-Historical Phenomenon Evidence of in nearly every society Evidence of at all times First slaves brought to America in 1619 Prior to Pilgrims on Plymouth Rock Country was literally founded on slavery Began as indentured servitude Evolved into an inherited racial classification More prevalent in South >50% of Alabama and Louisiana’s people Yet only 15% of whites owned slaves Economic dependence
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Origins of Civil Rights Movements Abolition present from pre-Revolution Moral opposition to Slavery Spread through the Northeast during 1750’s 1780-1804 all Northern States had banned slavery Did not seek equality Sought separation Often favored deportation Liberia 1834 - New York Female Reform Society Women’s participation expands, working for: Prison reform Moral reform of people Temperance Extended work opportunities for women Some abolitionists allied with women’s groups Others refuse to work with them afterwards Women become vocal as abolitionists 1848 - Seneca Falls Convention Declaration of Sentiments Replicates Declaration of Independence, but for women
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1860’s – Civil War Republican Party – 1854 Combines elements of 2 abolition parties with plan for
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2011 for the course POLI SCI 790:106 taught by Professor Andersen during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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09CivilRights_bw_ - American Government Lecture 9 Civil Rights Eagleton Lecture Wednesday February 17 5pm Lona Valmoro Special Assistant to Sec of

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