05Federalism_bw_ - American Government Class 5 Principles...

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American Government Class 5 - Principles of the Constitution
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Federalist 51 - Checks and Balances Impossible to create separate powers Constitution is just words People naturally will try to steal powers Answer: Facilitate protection of powers Agreed on separate branches of power Independent of each other Allow each branch to defend itself
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Federalist 51 - Human Nature Ambition must be made to counteract ambition . The interest of the man must be connected with the constitutional rights of the place. It may be a reflection on human nature , that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. But what is government itself, but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself . A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions
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Federalist 51 - Federalism Break government into 2 powers Federal and State Government Separation of Powers Divide powers of Federal government among 3 independent branches Checks and Balances Give each branch ability to protect itself and nullify the others
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Federalist 51 - The Legislature Will naturally be the most powerful Break it in two Require collaboration between the Chambers Provide power elsewhere to balance it Give President power to nullify Give Judiciary power to overrule Grant representation among diverse population to prevent a steady majority So powers can not be wielded against a minority
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Ratification Achieved Federalist Papers a popular success 11 States Ratify the Constitution Major concession to ensure ratification Federalists agree to a Bill of Rights Washington unanimously elected President Nation braces for a second founding No certainty that this will last A “Great Experiment” in democracy Franklin “We have given you a republic, if you can keep it”
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Constitution - 6 Weaknesses 1. Tyranny of our uncertain ancestors Debated by 55 white men of 12 States Signed by only 39 of them Ratified by 11 States originally Passed 4 of those with less than 55% Passed the final state by 3 votes Provides little clear meaning
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Ratification Results Date State Votes Yes No 1 December 7, 1787 Delaware 30 0 2 December 12, 1787 Pennsylvania 46 23 3 December 18, 1787 New Jersey 38 0 4 January 2, 1788 Georgia 26 0 5 January 9, 1788 Connecticut 128 40 6 February 6, 1788 Massachusetts 187 168 7 April 28, 1788 Maryland 63 11 8 May 23, 1788 South Carolina 149 73 9 June 21, 1788 New Hampshire
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05Federalism_bw_ - American Government Class 5 Principles...

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