4Constitution_bw_ - American Government Lecture 4 The...

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American Government Lecture 4 - The Constitution
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Schedule Lecture 3 Review Lecture 4 - The Constitution
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Lecture 3 Review 13 Colonies All with different origins, religions and laws Made up of very independent people 5 different types of people All with different economic interests British Rule Not strong rule Mainly concerned with protecting borders Attempts to tax the people fail miserably
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Lecture 3 Review Colonists rebel Decide to seek independence Declaration of Independence Revolutionary War Main complaint is a dislike of distant government Create a loose Confederation Articles of Confederation Weak system of collaboration of States States keep all real power Central government tries to coordinate them
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Articles - Powers Mainly dealt with mutual defense and trade Could declare war Could make treaties Could appoint military officers Could coin or borrow money Could regulate trade with Natives Not much power, mainly deliberative State legislatures selected and could repeal reps • Very little room for reps to compromise No force behind decisions anyway • If States disobeyed Congress, no punishment
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Articles - Weaknesses Very Ineffective No power to raise taxes Could not regulate interstate trade Could not regulate foreign-State trade Had no army of its own No Executive or Judiciary Maintained sovereignty of States At cost of any union
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Articles - Duration Within 2 years people sought reform No International respect England declared without a single leader to consult with, it was impossible to have a treaty with the United States Each State created independent treaties Decisions made by Congress were ignored States refused to provide funds States refused to abide by trade restrictions Annapolis Convention of 1786 5 States discuss reforms Agree to meet with all States in Philadelphia
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Shays’ Rebellion Post-Revolutionary War Revolutionary War veterans paid in cash Massachusetts government accepts taxes only in gold Banks begin foreclosing on farms Officer in Colonial Militia retaliates Reforms militia, seizes courthouses State militia responds, Shays attacks arsenal MA appeals for aid, nobody responds
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Response to Shays Damaged image abroad Washington - “I am mortified beyond expression that in the moment of our acknowledged independence we should by our conduct verify the predictions of our transatlantic foe, and render ourselves ridiculous and contemptible in the eyes of all Europe.” All States (except RI) agree to a meeting Philadelphia Convention is called
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Philadelphia Convention Intended to reform, not rewrite Articles Delegates realize overhaul is needed Lack the authority to do it
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4Constitution_bw_ - American Government Lecture 4 The...

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