Lec17_Audition_Chap1 - Auditory Perception(Chapter 10 Part II Jonathan Pillow Perception(PSY 323)The University of Texas at Austin Lecture 17

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Unformatted text preview: Auditory Perception (Chapter 10, Part II) Jonathan Pillow Perception (PSY 323)The University of Texas at Austin Lecture 17 consequences of age-related reductions in high-requency sensitivity 1. Ringtones your professor can ʼ t hear 2. “dispersion devices” for loitering youths- introduced in UK despite some debate over ethics / legality. Sound Localization Problem with using ITDs and ILDs for sound localization: • Cone of confusion : A region of positions in space where all sounds produce the same ITDs and ILDs Q : where is the cone of confusion for a point directly in front of your head? Experiments by Wallach (1940) demonstrated this problem Sound source • circular screen presents moving grating • subjects feel themselves to be moving • incorrectly attribute sound source to above or below them, (due to cone of confusion) Sound Localization Overcoming the cone of confusion • Turning the head can disambiguate ILD/ITD similarity Head-related transfer function (HRTF) • describes how pinnae, ear canals, head, and torso change the intensity of sounds with different frequencies as the sound location changes • Each person has his/her own HRTF (based on his/her own body) and uses it to help locate sounds HRTF for one sound source location (30° to left, 12° above horizontal) HRTF: can be measured with microphone in ear canal some frequencies attenuated; others ampli¡ed HRTF varies with sound source elevation (& azimuth) • provides information about source location in 3D Head-related transfer function (HRTF) • Can learn a new HRTF in about 6 weeks (shown experimentally using inserted artificial pinna) • Old HRTF is stored (can return to old one instantaneously) • Hofman et al 1998 : inserted plastic molds into pinnae, altering subjects’ HRTFs • sound localization performance abruptly degraded Findings: •...
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2011 for the course PSY 332 taught by Professor Salinas during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Lec17_Audition_Chap1 - Auditory Perception(Chapter 10 Part II Jonathan Pillow Perception(PSY 323)The University of Texas at Austin Lecture 17

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