VestibularSystem

VestibularSystem - Figure 15.6 The vestibular apparatus The...

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Figure 15.6 The vestibular apparatus The Vestibular System
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Vestibular system: The set of five organs—three semicircular canals and two otolith organs—located in each inner ear that sense head motion and head orientation with respect to gravity Also called the “vestibular labyrinth” An often overlooked sense: The vestibular “sixth sense” Evolutionarily very old
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Modalities and Qualities of Spatial Orientation The three spatial orientation modalities: 1. Angular motion: Can be sensed when rotating head from side to side as if to say “no” 2. Linear motion: Sensed when accelerating or decelerating in a car 3. Tilt: Can be sensed when holding the head up and down as in reading or watching the sky
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Figure 15.2 Movement of the head can be described in terms of a simple fixed coordinate system
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Figure 15.3 Bodies can turn (rotate) in three directions
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Modalities and Qualities of Spatial Orientation Linear motion Movements represented in terms of changes in the x-, y-, and z-axes Any arbitrary linear motion can be represented as a change along these three axes
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Figure 15.4 Translating bodies can move in three directions
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Figure 15.6 The vestibular apparatus
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Figure 15.8 The semicircular canals
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Peripheral Structure of the Mammalian Vestibular System Semicircular canals Each one is about three-fourths of a toroid (donut) shape, measuring 15 mm long and 1.5 mm in diameter Canals are filled with a fluid called perilymph A second, smaller toroid is found inside the larger toroid, measuring 0.3 mm in diameter Formed by a membrane filled with fluid called endolymph Cross section of each canal swells substantially near where the canals join the vestibule: Ampulla
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Peripheral Structure of the Mammalian Vestibular System Semicircular canals (cont’d) Within the endolymph space of each ampulla is the crista Cristae: The specialized detectors of angular motion located in each semicircular canal in a swelling called the ampulla Each crista has about 7000 hair cells and associated supporting cells and nerve fibers Cilia of hair cells project into a jellylike cupula that forms an elastic dam extending to the opposite wall of the ampulla, with endolymph
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2011 for the course PSY 332 taught by Professor Salinas during the Spring '07 term at University of Texas.

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VestibularSystem - Figure 15.6 The vestibular apparatus The...

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