DNA REPAIR - approximate positions of some of the genes of...

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Regulation of the SOS response regulon in E. coli. (A) About 30 genes around the E. coli chromosome are normally repressed by the binding of a LexA dimer (barbell structure) to their operators. Some SOS genes are expressed at low levels, as indicated by single arrows. (B) After DNA damage, the single- stranded DNA (ssDNA) that accumulates in the cell binds to RecA (circled A), forming a RecA nucleoprotein filament, which binds to LexA, causing LexA to cleave itself. The cleaved repressor can no longer bind to the operators of the genes, and the genes are induced as indicated by two arrows. The
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Unformatted text preview: approximate positions of some of the genes of the SOS regulon are shown. SOS RESPONSE 20 Trans-lesion synthesis by DNA POL V (A) Helicase proceeds on the lagging strand past the damage, separating the strands, but the DNA POL Ill stalls, leaving a single-stranded gap. (B) The RecA protein binds to the single-stranded DNA. The bound RecA protein attracts DNA POL V which replicates past the damage, often making mistakes. (C) DNA POL V is replaced by the normal replicative DNA POL Ill; replication continues. A B C 21...
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DNA REPAIR - approximate positions of some of the genes of...

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