97_09_LB_QuanTraits

97_09_LB_QuanTraits - Student questions Bio 97 I was...

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1 Complex Traits ©1999,2000,2001,2002 Lee Bardwell Bio 97 Student questions “I was wondering if alcoholism is considered a genetic disease?” “I searched online to find out if schizophrenia is hereditary. Some sites say yes and others say no. I'm still puzzled” “I am not sure if this is a genetic disease, but some science is linking this to genetics. SIDS - sudden infant death syndrome.” Barry Bonds Layperson He has good genes Genetics student: Same genes as the rest of us Good alleles Or, it could have been his upbringing ©2001 Lee Bardwell Nature vs. Nurture Are a person’s key traits - such as intelligence, empathy, morality, and charisma - determined by their genes (their nature ”) or by their enviroment ( nurture = their upbringing)? Often, the answer is BOTH ©2000 Lee Bardwell
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2 Athleticism It seems to be somewhat genetically determined But obviously there’s not as single ‘baseball skill’ gene with “all-star” and “bench-warmer” alleles. ©2005 Lee Bardwell Example Height Weight Blood pressure Personality/Behavior Psychological Conditions IQ Heart Disease Diabetes Alzheimer’s Disease Can’t be attributed to 1 gene, 2 allele, dominant-recessive inheritence Are these genetically Determined traits? ©2001 Lee Bardwell Complex Traits Multifactorial Quantitative ©2002 Lee Bardwell Slightly different, but essentially interchangeable terms Jargon Time Multifactorial trait ©1999 Lee Bardwell Trait in which variation is caused by the combined effects of Multiple genes Environmental factors
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3 Quantitative traits = phenotypes range over the quantity of a characteristic rather than falling into discrete types Examples: Height Weight Blood pressure IQ Often fit normal distribution Typically multifactorial ©2000 Lee Bardwell 5000 British women (5 ʼ 3”) H&J Fig. 15.2 Normal distribution H&J Fig. 15.5 Symmetric, “bell-shaped” curve
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