AlejandroGonzalezFinal-LGUPaper-HRM511M

- Master of Business Administration College of Business and Economics De La Salle University August 2010 Local Government Development and

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Master of Business Administration College of Business and Economics - De La Salle University, August 2010 Local Government Development and Implementation of Capital Establishment for Sustainable Abaca Plantation in the Philippines Engr. Alejandro S. Gonzalez 1 1 Master in Business Administration, Graduate School of Business - College of Business and Economics - De La Salle University, Manila, Philippines The Philippine Abaca, Manila hemp, has remained a reliable source of export earnings since the 1980’s. It has contributed more than USD80 Million from the 1980’s to the late 1990’s. It dominates the world market supply by 85% ever since. This product has been a consistent dollar earner of the Philippines and contributed to the upliftment of the socio-economic condition of the people of the archipelago. This commodity is one of the flagship products of the Eastern Visayas Region. INTRODUCTION Abaca 1 Abaca was introduced to the archipelago at the Spanish era as clothing material. It is specie of banana indigenous to the Philippine which has great economic importance, being harvested for its fiber, is also called Manila Hemp. On average the plant grows at about 6 meters tall. The fiber was originally used in making twines and ropes but now the abaca is pulped and used in a variety of paper-like products. Abaca is classified as a hard fiber within the category of coir, henequen and sisal. The leaves grow from the trunk of the plant and the sheath contains the valuable fiber. The fiber is composed primarily of plant elements such as cellulose, lignin and pectin. The plant grows in well-drained loamy soil. Pieces of mature root are planted at the start of the rainy season and the harvest from the initial 18-25 month growth period is every three to eight months. The plant's total lifespan is 10 years. The harvest includes having operations concerning the leaf sheaths to be tuxied, separating the primary and secondary sheath, stripped, acquiring the fiber and dried, traditionally sun-drying. The fibers can be spun into twines and cordages. The fiber yields ranges from 1.0 to 1.5 tons/hectare Most of the abaca fiber is pulped and processed into specialty paper used for tea bags, vacuum bags, and 1 “Hope Springs Eternal for the Abaca Industry” – Agriculture Business Week currency, made into handcraft bags, carpets, clothing and furniture. The abaca rope is durable and can resist salt water damage. It is superior over all other fibers of its class thus is the choice for ropes used in oil dredging, an vies and merchant shipping. Lupis is the finest quality of abaca and Sinamay is woven from abaca. Recommended varieties include Linawagan Puti, Linawagan Pula, Sogmod and Lausigon for Region 5; Laylay, Inosa, Linawaan, Linlay, Putian, Laguis, Linlib and Linino for Region 8 and Inosa, Tangongon and Maguindanao for Mindanao Regions. Abaca Grade
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2011 for the course GSB 4346 taught by Professor Sss during the Spring '10 term at De La Salle University.

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- Master of Business Administration College of Business and Economics De La Salle University August 2010 Local Government Development and

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