SampleAcademicJournal

- International Journal of Genetics and Molecular Biology Vol 2(6 pp 101-111 June 2010 Available online at http/www.academicjournals.org/IJGMB

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
International Journal of Genetics and Molecular Biology Vol. 2(6), pp. 101-111, June 2010 Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/IJGMB ISSN 2006-9863 © 2010 Academic Journals Review Colorectal cancer, TGF- β signaling and SMADs A. Syed Sameer 1, 2 , Safiya Abdullah 1 , Mujeeb Z. Banday 3 , Nidda Syeed 1 and Mushtaq A. Siddiqi 1 * 1 Department of Immunology and Molecular Medicine, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Kashmir, India 190011. 2 Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar, Kashmir, India 190011. 3 Department of Biotechnology, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal, Srinagar, Kashmir, India 190011. Accepted 31 March, 2010 Colorectal cancer (CRC) being the commonest cancer, is the major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. TGF- β pathway is one of the important pathways that play a prominent role in cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Smad dependent TGF- β signaling cascade is responsible for the regulation and expression of almost 500 odd genes, which in turn play important role in the proper development of intestinal mucosa. Here in this review we have discussed the overall machinery of the TGF - β pathway and the advances in the mutational research on SMAD4 gene in cancers with special look on our own research in CRC cases of Kashmiri population. Key words: Colorectal cancer, Kashmir, SMADs, mutations, PCR-SSCP. INTRODUCTION CRC (CRC), also called colon cancer or large bowel cancer includes cancerous growths in the colon, rectum and appendix. CRC is a commonly diagnosed cancer in both men and women and is the third most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world. CRC causes 655,000 deaths worldwide per year, including about 16,000 in the UK, and about 50,000 in United States, where it is the second most common site (after lung) to cause cancer death (World Health Organization, 2006; American Cancer Society, 2008). Two kinds of observations indicate a genetic contri- bution to CRC risk: a) increased incidence of CRC among persons with a family history of CRC; and b) families in which multiple family members are affected with CRC, the pattern indicates an autosomal dominant inheritance of cancer susceptibility (Burt et al., 1996; Lynch et al., 1996; Utsunomiya et al., 1990; Herrera, 1990; Schoen, 2000). *Corresponding author. E-mail: [email protected] Tel: +91 9419767768. Fax: +91-194-2403470. About 75% of patients with CRC have sporadic dis-ease, with no apparent evidence of having inherited the disorder. The remaining 25% of patients have a family history of CRC that suggests a genetic contribution, com- mon exposures among family members, or a combination of both. Genetic mutations have been identified as the cause of inherited cancer risk in some colon cancer– prone families; these mutations are estimated to account for only 5 - 6% of CRC cases overall. It is likely that other
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/09/2011 for the course GSB 4346 taught by Professor Sss during the Spring '10 term at De La Salle University.

Page1 / 11

- International Journal of Genetics and Molecular Biology Vol 2(6 pp 101-111 June 2010 Available online at http/www.academicjournals.org/IJGMB

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online