Chapter 22 The Atmosphere of Earth

Chapter 22 The Atmosphere of Earth - Chapter 22 The...

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Chapter 22 The Atmosphere of Earth: Notes 1. absolute humidity – measurement of the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere at a particular time is called absolute humidity. 2. barometer – used to measured atmospheric pressure. Invented in 1643 by Italian named Torricelli. Closed one end of a glass tube and then filled it with mercury. Tube is then placed open end down in a bowl of mercury while holding the mercury in the tube with a finger. When he removed his finger a small amount of mercury moved into the bowl leaving a vacuum at the top end of the atmosphere. 3. Chinook – Compression of air increases the temperature by increasing the kinetic energy of the molecules. The wind that is created is called a Chinook. It is common to mountainous and adjacent regions. Wind of compressed air with sharp temperature increases that can sublimate or melt away any existing snow cover in a single day. 4. condensation nuclei - Condensation of water vapor into fog or cloud droplets takes places on tiny particles present in the air. The particules are called condensation nuclei. Hundreds of tiny dust, smoke, soot, and saly crystals suspended in each cubic centimeter of the air that serve as condensation nuclei. The most effective are the tiny salt crystals because salt attracts water molecules. 5. dew – temperature at which condensation begins is called the dew point temperature. If the dew point is avove 0C the water vapor will condense on surfaces as a liquid which is called dew. Condenses directly on objects and do not “fall out” of the air. Forms in low-lying areas before forming on slovpes and the sides of hills because of the density differences of cool and warm air. Water molecules need something to condense upon. Condensation of water vapor into fog or cloud droplets takes places on tiny particles present in the air. 6. dew point – temperature becomes colder and evaporation rate decreases faster than the condensation rate, with the result that condensation will occur at a certain temperature. This temperature is called the dew point. Relative humidity increases as the atmosphere cools, reaching saturation and 100 percent relative humidity at the dew point. 7.
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2011 for the course PSC 1121 taught by Professor Tulsian during the Spring '11 term at Daytona State College.

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Chapter 22 The Atmosphere of Earth - Chapter 22 The...

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