cla204h-d09 - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO Faculty of Arts and...

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Unformatted text preview: UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO Faculty of Arts and Science DECEMBER 2009 EXAMINATIONS CLA204H1 F Duration - 3 hours No Aids Allowed Answer ALL Questions in the Exam Booklets Provided. Part 1: Short Answer. 40 Marks. Answer ALL of the following questions. 1. What is another name for Apollo? [1 mark] 2. a) What keeps the Greek fleet at Aulis on their way to Troy? [1 mark] b) What solves the problem? [1 mark] Which leader was Vergil’s Aeneid written to honour? [1 mark] How did Acrisius die? [1 mark] 1n Euripides’ Hippolytus, why is Hippolytus punished by Aphrodite? [1 mark] What does Odysseus tell Polyphemus his name is? [1 mark] Which goddess’ advances does Gilgamesh rudely refuse? [1 mark] 909.0%”de In Sophocles’ Antigone, what argument does Antigone put forth about her defying Creon’s edict? [1 mark] 9. What are numz‘na? [1 mark] 10. a) Who is Phrixus’ stepmother? [1 mark] b) What does she do to get rid of him? [3 marks] 11. Who is punished for seeing Artemis in her bath? [1 mark] 12. What does Heracles bring back from Hades? [1 mark] 13. In Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, what has caused the plague in Thebes? [1 mark] 14. Why did the Romans seize and carry off the Sabine women? [1 mark] 15. What does Achilles do to the corpse of Hector? [1 mark] Page 1 of6 16. a) Who is the Trojan hero who escapes the fall of Troy? [1 mark] b) Where does he finally settle? [1 mark] 17. How does Euryclea recognize Odysseus? [1 mark] 18. How does the rape of Lucretia put an end to the monarchy in Rome? [1 mark] 19. Why does Minos go to Athens? [1 mark] 20. How is Hestia representative of the ideal Greek woman? [1 mark] 21. a) How does Clytemnestra welcome her husband back to Mycenae? [1 mark] b) How does her son react to this? [1 mark] 22. What was the crime of Erisychthon? [1 mark] 23. Why did Romulus kill Remus? [1 mark] 24. a) What was served at the banquet of Thyestes? [1 mark] b) Who else in myth ate the same kind of meal? [1 mark] 25. Name two oracular sites of ancient Greece. [2 marks] 26. What was Euhemerus’ View of the gods? [1 mark] 27. Whom does Theseus abandon on an island? [1 mark] 28. In Aeschylus’ Agamemnon, who foresees her own death? [1 mark] 29. Name the two war gods of the Greek Pantheon. [2 marks] 30. Why does Jason go to Colchis? [1 mark] 31. What is the Oath of Tyndareus? [1 mark] Part 2: Identification/Definitions. 30 Marks. Identify or define TEN (10) of the following thirteen (13) names or terms. 1. Europa 2. Argonautica 5. Evander 6. Mycenae 9. Troezen 10. xenia 13. eponymous ancestor 3. cosmogony 7. Judgment of Paris 8. Potnia [heron l 1. Epigoni Page 2 of 6 4. Haemon l2. Nostoi E l g l g; i Part 3: Identification of Literature. 25 Marks. Choose FIVE (5) of the following six (6) passages. Identify the author and title of the work; then discuss the mythic and cultural significance of each. Answer in paragraph form. 1. All this, ungrateful man, I did for you, yet you betrayed me, courting your new bride, although I had already borne your children. Had you been childless still, you might be pardoned for so desiring this new marriage bed, but, as it is, trust in your oath has flown. Do you believe the ancient gods still reign? Or have they made new rules for men to obey? How can I learn the answer? This alone is sure: Your guilty conscience knows you lied to me. My poor right hand! which you so often clasped. Poor knees! which often felt your false embrace, a perjurer’s, designed to cheat my hopes. Well, should I talk with you as with a friend, should I expect a kindly act from you? These very questions make you seem the viler. 2. I taught them mathematics, wisdom’s lore, and words in letters, of all things remembrancer, mother and servant of arts. I was the first to harness beasts with saddle, yoke, and chain, thus making them inherit mortals’ sweat. I set the horse, exulting in his reins, to draw the car, image of wealthy pride. Who before me, pray, made canvas wings for sea-battered ships? I was the one who found all this for men—but for myself, no way to freedom from these pressing toils. 3. Ohorrible! Ohorrible! Most horrible! Again the crushing weight of truth foreseen staggers my mind with visions I scarce dare speak. Do you see those children floating above the house, the sort of shapes one only sees in nightmares? Dead, dead! at the will of those who ought to love them! Why are their hands full of their own roast flesh, their own entrails—they hold it out as food-— 0 horror! their father takes it, tastes it, eats. For this, I tell you, a certain mangy lion Page 3 of 6 plots his revenge on my returning master (so I must name him; I bear the yoke of a slave), keeping his house and reveling in his bed. 4. Thus, from his birth the gods gave glorious honours to Peleus: In wealth he surpassed all others; the Myrmidons were his subjects; to him, though only a mortal, the gods gave a goddess in marriage. But with this some god mixed evil: No child was born in his palace to follow him on the throne, save one, soon fated to die. What comfort am I to his gloomy old age, so far from my country, lingering here in the Troad, a curse to you and your children? But since the gods on Olympus have brought this disaster upon you, this endless war by your city, this endless bloodshed and slaughter, all you can do is endure it; do not grieve for what cannot be altered. You will not accomplish a thing by endlessly mourning for your son. You cannot bring him to life. And worse things are still to be suffered. 5. Never may a woman knowing more than woman ought infest my house. For Cypris stirs up mischief much more in clever women; the stupid doll is saved from folly by her witlessness. No woman needs a clever serving—maid; better a dumb and snarling animal with nothing to say, nothing she wants to her. But as things are, women contrive their schemes within the house, and the servants bring them forth. Thus, you old bitch, you sidled up to me with an unholy offer, to share my father’s wife, whose person should be sacred in my eyes. Bring holy water; I’ll pour it in my ears. to wash away your foul polluting bargain, What made you think that I could be so vile, I, whose purity shrinks at the very thought? 6. He ripped the golden pins from off her robe, raised them on high, and plunged them in his eyes, choking out words of anguish, such as these: “Never again will these eyes ever watch me doing or suffering what I have done or suffered! Only in inner darkness of my soul shall I hereafter see the faces of those I never should have seen, and I shall fail to see the missing forms, for which I longed.” Page 4 of 6 i i i E ‘f 1, 1% *5 4 E “u ,w MN.” MW, 4mm : 43w» wnwwuhvas-«mrzflhmmdmvxw{amwmvnfiawmmfltmkw‘ as, “Mm/W- Part 4: Identification of Art. 20 Marks. Choose FIVE (5) of the following six (6) images. Identify the figures in each, listing their iconographic attributes (if applicable), and discuss the scene to the best of your ability. Be sure to comment on the mythic significance of each. Answer in paragraph form. Page 5 of 6 Part5: Essay. 15 Marks. 1. Folktale elements play a significant part in many Greek myths. In three to four paragraphs, discuss the use of folktale types and motifs in three to four myths. Total Pages = 6 Total Marks = 130 Page 6 of 6 ii, “.3 a 3‘ 3 Amway.“ m waamWWa-kawuwaama WWW . é; {$55 , , __ , . 1 , s i .Tixl, :5:{2<1x3§¥€~233®2.5.2543A$255.,;§§1¥1g3yqikmigégisufi; a, 5.4.1:: ...
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cla204h-d09 - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO Faculty of Arts and...

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