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201-03_chapter_7_handouts

201-03_chapter_7_handouts - Quantum Quantum Theory and the...

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Quantum Theory and the Chapter 7 Electronic Structure of Atoms
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Maxwell (1873), proposed that visible light consists of electromagnetic waves . Electromagnetic radiation is the emission and transmission of energy in the form of electromagnetic waves. Speed of light ( c ) in vacuum = 3.00 x 10 8 m/s All electromagnetic radiation λ x ν = c
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Electromagnetic Radiation as Wave Wavelength ( λ ) is the distance between identical points on successive waves. Amplitude is the vertical distance from the midline of a wave to the peak or trough. Frequency ( ν ) is the number of waves that pass through a particular point in 1 second (Hz = 1 cycle/s). The speed ( u ) of the wave = λ x ν
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3 Cases where the wave model of EM radiation failed: “Heated Solids Problem” ― solved by Planck in 1900 When solids are heated, they emit electromagnetic radiation over a wide range of wavelengths. Radiant energy emitted by an object at a certain temperature depends on its wavelength. Max Planck assumed that energy comes in packages or bundles. Smallest quantity of energy (light) that can be emitted or absorbed in the form of EM radiation in discrete units (quantum).
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