40_00 - Imaging t he Earth's Interior J on F Claerbout G eophysics D e p a r t m e n t S t a n f o r d University c omposition by trofft on an

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Imaging the Earth's Interior Jon F. Claerbout Geophysics Department Stanford University
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composition by trofft on an Imagen 8/300 laser printer Copyright @ 1984 by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University Stanford, California 94305 U.S.A. Produced as report SEP-40. Copying of this report is permitted for internal purposes of the Sponsors of the Stanford Exploration Project. Available after January I, 1985 from a commercial publisher. - ttroff is a trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories
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This book is dedicated to Cecil and Ida Green who enjoyed the excitement of being among the pioneers, had the foresight to garner a fortune, and now have the fun of giving it away to universities throughout the world.
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Contents Title Dedication Preface Introduction Introduction to Imaging Exploding Reflectors Wave Extrapolation as a 2-D Filter Four Wide-Angle Migration Methods The Physical Basis The Paraxial Wave Equation Mastery of 2-D Fourier Techniques Sample Programs Why Time and Space ? Wave-Extrapolation Equations Finite Differencing Monochromatic Wave Programs Splitting and Full Separation Recursive Dip Filters Retarded Coordinates Finite Differencing in (t , x , z )-Space Introduction to St ability
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Offset, Another Dimension Absorption and a Little Focusing Introduction to Dip Survey Sinking with the DSR Equation The Meaning of the DSR Equation Stacking and Velocity Analysis Migration with Velocity Estimation Lateral Velocity Variation in Bigger Doses The Craft of Wavefield Extrapolation Physical and Cosmetic Aspects of Wave Extrapolation Anisotropy Dispersion and Wave-Migration Accuracy Frequency Dispersion and Wave-Migration Accuracy Absorbing Sides Tuning up Fourier Migrations Impedance Accuracy - the Contractor's View The Bulletproofing of Muir and Godfrey Some Frontiers Radial Traces Slant Stack Snell Waves and Skewed Coordinates Interval Velocity by Linear Moveout Multiple Reflection - Current Practice Multiple Reflection - Prospects Profile Imaging Predictions for the Next Decade Appendix: Sponsors of the Stanford Exploration Project References Index
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Preface Some History Reflection seismologists make images of the earth's interior. Through the 1960s this was done in an ad hoc fashion. Between 1968 and 1972, I con- ceived and field tested a new method of image making based directly on the wave equation of physics. Previously the wave equation had been used to predict observations starting from simplified, hypothesized models. It was not used in routine data analysis. My imaging method using finite differences soon came into widespread use in the petroleum exploration industry. Many other people quickly became involved and made important improvements. The earlier ad hoc methods were reinterpreted and they too improved in the light of wave theory.
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2011 for the course GEOL 7320 taught by Professor Stewart during the Spring '11 term at University of Houston - Downtown.

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40_00 - Imaging t he Earth's Interior J on F Claerbout G eophysics D e p a r t m e n t S t a n f o r d University c omposition by trofft on an

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