Group Paper - Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality” Paris Amado, Loryn Dion, Eddie Ferrara, Cristina Napoli, and Kevin Ray Work and Society
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
In “Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality”, Christine L. Williams conducted a study in which to find discrimination, both gendered and racial, in two national toy stores. In the following pages, Williams’ study will be explained, analyzed, and criticized to see her findings and what five different readers have taken from it. To do this study, Williams applied at several different toy stores, but was only hired at two (Toy Warehouse and Diamond Toys). She went into these jobs, not saying that it was for a sociological study, due to the fact that if it were known, the interactions she had with fellow employees could have been drastically different. Williams worked at these jobs for a grand total of six weeks as a part-time employee. Williams found many differences between the two stores where she worked. At Diamond Toys, she found that the workers were comprised of mostly white women, who were unionized and that the consumer-base was made up of middle to upper class people. At the Toy Warehouse, she was working in the “bad neighborhood”. She was one of three white workers. The customer base was very varied but comprised of mostly lower class customers. Also, the Toy Warehouse was not unionized. As far as inequality goes, first, Williams found that retail jobs are structured to enhance inequality by gender and race. White men are paid the highest out of the low-earning retail jobs. When it came to position hierarchy and gender-race inequalities, she noticed that directors and assistant directors were white men; Managers were more diverse; Supervisors at Diamond Toys were white and mostly men while supervisors at the Toy Warehouse were racially diverse and mostly women; Associates were diverse except at Diamond Toys where there were no black men. She also found a lot of segregation by tasks; Back-of-the-house employees were mostly men; Front-of-the-house employees were fairly diverse; The Toy Warehouse had African
Background image of page 2
American men and women security guards; Diamond Toys had white men and women working security; At both stores, their janitorial staff was made up of Hispanic women. This social hierarchy of position is because people are elected to positions that they are qualified for. Williams argues that it’s more difficult for some workers to gain those qualifications. Also, both stores practiced interpellation which is where an employer will hire someone based on if they “look right” for a certain position. For instance, at the Toy Warehouse, Williams was hired as a cashier, even though she asked to be a merchandiser, just because she was light-skinned and young. One of her coworkers, who was 35 and African American, had been working hard to receive the position of cashier but only got to do it two months after she was hired, the same day that Williams was hired. Because of this, Williams made the observation that in a racist and
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/10/2011 for the course BDIC 396p taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at UMass (Amherst).

Page1 / 12

Group Paper - Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online