sara_trematodes_2010[1] - Todays Flukes TISSUE AND BLOOD...

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1 TISSUE AND BLOOD FLUKES Cornell University Ithaca, NY Today’s Flukes Fasciola hepatica lonorchis Clonorchis Opisthorchis Dicrocoelium aragonimus Paragonimus Schistosoma Fasciola hepatica Sheep Liver Fluke Fasciola hepatica A parasite of sheep that has successfully been able to extend its range to include other hosts, e.g., other ruminants, pigs, and people. Expanded geographical range with the movement of sheep that now includes most of the world. These worms, first described by Linnaeus, have the distinction of being the first trematode for which the life cycle was elucidated. A large fluke with adults that are about 3 cm long and 1.3 cm across Fresh specimens are reddish-brown to mahogany colored p gy Live in the bile ducts Life cycle of Fasciola hepatica similar to Fasciolopsis buski Metacercaria encyst on vegetation!
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2 Fasciola hepatica In the final host Metacercariae excyst in the intestinal tract pidly enetrate the intestinal wall rapidly penetrate the intestinal wall These immature flukes are called marita penetrate the abdominal cavity Migrate to the liver and into the bile ducts developing flukes ingest blood and tissue leaving a trail of dark waste “fluke pigment” Acute infection Damage to liver tissue y the migration of flukes by t e g at o o u es Can be significant depending on the number of marita Acute form consists of upper gastric pain and hepatomegaly associated coughing and omiting jaundice diarrhea vomiting, jaundice, diarrhea, fever, eosinophilia and fever Chronic infection Flukes take up residence in liver bile ducts Bile duct walls undergo hyperplasia and scarring blockage of the biliary system enlarged liver and jaundice Lighter infections , after flukes ature igns tend to subside mature signs tend to subside infection is maintained in a relatively steady state within the host with adults remaining in bile ducts Easy to misdiagnose!
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3 Fasciola hepatica Diagnosis is by detection of the large egg in the feces Egg is 130 to 150 m long and some 60 to 90 m wide Immunologic methods of diagnosis are used in countries where the infection is more common The drug of choice currently appears to be triclabendazole. Fasciola hepatica Typically this is a zoonotic infection of people Occurs most commonly in areas where large numbers of omestic animals sheep and cattle are infected domestic animals, sheep and cattle, are infected. The infection is more common in tropical parts of the world, but it can do well in more temperate climates and has been common in areas such as Wales, New York, and the Bolivian highlands. Found in most wild ruminants such as deer, camels, and llamas.
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2011 for the course BIOMI 3310 at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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sara_trematodes_2010[1] - Todays Flukes TISSUE AND BLOOD...

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