milner_goodale_1998

milner_goodale_1998 - PSYCHE The Visual Brain in Action by...

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The Visual Brain in Action A. David Milner School of Psychology University of St Andrews Fife, KY16 9JU Scotland, U.K. [email protected] http://psych.st - and.ac.uk:8080/people/lect/admilner.html and Melvyn A. Goodale Department of Psychology The University of Western Ontario London, Ontario N6A 5C2 CANADA [email protected] http://yoda.sscl.uwo.ca/psychology/faculty/goodale.html Copyright (c) A. David Milner and Melvyn A. Goodale 1998 PSYCHE, 4(12), October 1998 http://psyche.cs.monash.edu.au/v4/psyche-4-12-milner.html KEYWORDS: visual consciousness, ventral and dorsal streams, visuomotor action, unconscious perception. PRECIS OF: A. David Milner and Melvyn A. Goodale The Visual Brain in Action (Oxford Psychology Series, No. 27) . Oxford University Press , xvii + 248pp. ISBN: 0198524080. Price: $35.00 pbk. 1. The Functions of Vision Standard accounts of vision implicitly assume that the purpose of the visual system is to construct some sort of internal model of the world outside -- a kind of simulacrum of the real thing, which can then serve as the perceptual foundation for all visually derived thought and action. The association of rich and distinctive conscious experiences with most of our perceptions gives credence to the idea that they must constitute a vital and necessary prerequisite for all of our visually-based behavior. But even though the perceptual representation of objects and events in the world is an important function of vision, it should not be forgotten that vision evolved in the first place, not to provide perception of the world per se, but to provide distal sensory control of the many different movements that organisms make. Many of the visual control systems for the different motor outputs evolved as relatively independent input- output modules. Thus, the different patterns of behavior exhibited by vertebrates, from catching prey to avoiding obstacles, can be shown to depend on independent pathways from the visual receptors through to the motor nuclei, each pathway processing a particular constellation of inputs and each evoking a particular combination of effector outputs. Of course, the visually guided behavior of many animals, particularly complex animals such as humans, is not rigidly bound to a set of Milner and Goodale's book The Visual Brain in Action may be purchased from Amazon.Com Page 1 of 8 PSYCHE: The Visual Brain in Action by A. David Milner and Melvyn A. Goodale 6/16/2004 http://psyche.cs.monash.edu.au/v4/psyche-4-12-milner.html
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visuomotor modules, however subtle those mechanisms might be. Much of our behavior is quite arbitrary with respect to sensory input and is clearly mediated by some sort of internal model of the world in which we live. In other words, representational systems have evolved -- systems that permit the brain to model the world, to identify objects and events, to attach meaning and significance to them, and to establish their causal relations. In humans and other primates, vision provides some of the most important inputs to these representational systems. Such
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2011 for the course BIONB 4230 taught by Professor Finlay,b.l. during the Fall '10 term at Cornell.

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milner_goodale_1998 - PSYCHE The Visual Brain in Action by...

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