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Table of Contents - Table of Contents Introduction 1...

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Table of Contents Introduction 1 Brainstorming 2 Thesis Development 2 Argumentative Claim 3 Comparative Words 4 The "Because" Element 5 Example 5 Outlining 7 Example Outline 10 Basic Essay Structure 11 Introduction 11 Body 11 Conclusion 14 Point-by-Point Discussion 14 Drafting 15 Body-point Structure 16 Adding to and Omitting from Quotations 19 Block Quotations 19 Parenthetical References 20 *Example (Essay Body Points, Class-wide Discussion Responses and Group Postings)* 22 Works Cited Page Information 23 Revision 26 MLA Essay Formatting Rules 27
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Plagiarism Discussion 27 Editing and Proofreading 29 Deductions 33 Guidelines 1 For the past several semesters, I’ve had a detailed ―Guidelines document, but the focus needed changing. This semester, the focus will be on the writing process and comparative-argumentation. Hopefully, you’ve learned that writing is a process in freshman composition. Well, we’re going to stress that process as you write comparative-argumentative literary analyses in this class. The first stage of any writing process is the pre-writing stage: the stage necessary to get your ideas down on paper. For a literature class, part of that stage of the process is reading the actual literature assignments. Also, you’ll need to reflect on how your group topic is illustrated in the literature. During the writing process, you should never simply stare at a blank sheet of paper (or a blank computer screen). Therefore, during this ―pre-writing process, you should perform one of the following techniques to get your ideas down on paper: brainstorming, free writing or clustering. I will focus on brainstorming in the following example. For the sake of continuity, let’s imagine that my group topic is ― Revenge. This is a theme that can be found in many works of literature. Now, let’s also suppose that we’ve been reading the following two works: ―The Cask of Amontillado by Poe and Othello by Shakespeare. All of the essays this semester will ask you to ― pit some aspect of one story, genre or time period against a si milar aspect of a different story, genre or time period. You are not being asked to find similarities and differences between the two stories: you are only being asked to prove that one story is ―better or ―more effective or ―more WHATEVER than the othe r story in illustrating some aspect of your group topic. Pitting one story or one character within that story or one aspect of one story against a similar aspect of the other story and trying to prove that one is doing something more effectively than the other in relation to the idea is called a comparative-argument. Guidelines 2 Brainstorming: First, I want to jot down some ideas about my group topic in relation to both of the stories that I’m examining: since my topic is revenge, I need to consider how revenge is illustrated, treated, handled, or manifests itself in the stories. So, I might make the following lists: “The Cask of Amontillado” Othello Montresor is seeking revenge
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