A Child history of England charles dickens

A Child history of England charles dickens - A Child's...

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Unformatted text preview: A Child's History of England, by Charles Dickens The Project Gutenberg eBook, A Child's History of England, by Charles Dickens, Illustrated by F. H. Townsend This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: A Child's History of England Author: Charles Dickens Release Date: May 6, 2007 [eBook #699] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-646-US (US-ASCII) ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A CHILD'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND*** Transcribed from the 1905 Chapman & Hall “Works of Charles Dickens” edition by David Price, email ccx074@pglaf.org A CHILD’S HISTORY OF ENGLAND By CHARLES DICKENS With Illustrations by F. H. Townsend and others LONDON: CHAPMAN & HALL, ld. NEW YORK: CHARLES SCRIBNER’S SONS 1905 CHAPTER I—ANCIENT ENGLAND AND THE ROMANS If you look at a Map of the World, you will see, in the left-hand upper corner of the Eastern Hemisphere, two Islands lying in the sea. They are England and Scotland, and Ireland. England and Scotland form the greater part of these Islands. Ireland is the next in size. The little neighbouring islands, which are so small upon the Map as to be mere dots, are chiefly little bits of Scotland,— broken off, I dare say, in the course of a great length of time, by the power of the restless water. In the old days, a long, long while ago, before Our Saviour was born on earth and lay asleep in a manger, these Islands were in the same place, and the stormy sea roared round them, just as it roars now. But the sea was not alive, then, with great ships and brave sailors, sailing to and from all parts of the world. It was very lonely. The Islands lay solitary, in the great expanse of water. The foaming waves dashed against their cliffs, and the bleak winds blew over their forests; but the winds and waves brought no adventurers to land upon the Islands, and the savage Islanders knew nothing of the rest of the world, and the rest of the world knew nothing of them. It is supposed that the Phœnicians, who were an ancient people, famous for carrying on trade, came in ships to these Islands, and found that they produced tin and lead; both very useful things, as you know, and both produced to this very hour upon the sea-coast. The most celebrated tin mines in Cornwall are, still, close to the sea. One of them, which I have seen, is so close to it that it is hollowed out underneath the ocean; and the miners say, that in stormy weather, when they are at work down in that deep place, they can hear the noise of the waves thundering above their heads....
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This note was uploaded on 02/12/2011 for the course CHIN 101 taught by Professor Dr.yu during the Spring '08 term at University Of Southern Mississippi .

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A Child history of England charles dickens - A Child's...

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