Chapter 13 - How Populations Evolve

Chapter 13 - How Populations Evolve - How Populations...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How Populations Evolve Chapter 13
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Evolution Changes in organisms over time Evolutionary adaptations - inherited traits that enhance an organism's ability to survive and reproduce in its particular environment
Background image of page 2
Charles Darwin Made a 5-year, round-the-world voyage Observed similarities between living and fossil organisms and diversity of life in regions he visited
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
LE 13-1b North America Great Britain ATLANTIC OCEAN PACIFIC OCEAN South America Andes Cape of Good Hope Cape Horn Tierra del Fuego Africa Europe Asia Equator PACIFIC OCEAN Australia Tasmania New Zealand The Galápagos Islands Pinta Fernandina Isabela Santiago Marchena Genovesa Daphne Islands Pinzón Santa Cruz Santa Fe San Cristobal Florenza Española Equator 0 0 40 miles 40 km PACIFIC OCEAN
Background image of page 4
On the Origin of Species Darwin’s book published in 1859 Laid out in great detail his evidence in support of the theory of evolution by natural selection Alfred Wallace conceived a theory almost identical to Darwin's
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Natural Selection as the Mechanism of Evolution Observation 1: Overproduction All species tend to produce excessive numbers This leads to a struggle for existence Figure 13.14
Background image of page 6
Observation 2: Individual variation Heritable variation exists among individuals in a population Figure 13.15
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Conclusion: Differential reproductive success (natural selection) Those individuals with traits best suited for the local environment leave more fertile offspring than less suited individuals
Background image of page 8
Natural Selection is Supported by Evidence from Artificial Selection
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Evidence for evolution Geological discoveries Biogeography Comparative anatomy Comparative embryology Molecular biology
Background image of page 10
Geological Discoveries Fossils and the fossil record
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 43

Chapter 13 - How Populations Evolve - How Populations...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online