lecture2 - Introduction to Electronics ECED3201-...

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Page 1 ECED3201- Introduction to Electronics Prof. Kamal El-Sankary, Ph.D Kamal.El-Sankary@Dal.ca Introduction to Electronics
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Page 2 Part I: Diodes ECED3201- Introduction to Electronics
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Introduction I. The Ideal Diode II. Terminal Characteristics of Junction Diodes III. Modeling the Diode Forward Characteristic IV. Operation in the Reverse Breakdown Region – Zener Diodes Page 3 Lecture Outline ECED3201- Introduction to Electronics
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Page 4 Lecture Outline ECED3201- Introduction to Electronics Introduction I. The Ideal Diode II. Terminal Characteristics of Junction Diodes III. Modeling the Diode Forward Characteristic IV. Operation in the Reverse Breakdown Region – Zener Diodes
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Page 5 Introduction This chapter is concerned with the study of diodes: o First we begin with a fictitious element, the ideal diode. o Second we study the characteristics of real diodes. o Finally we study the physical operation of the diodes The simplest and most fundamental nonlinear circuit element is the diode Just like a resistor, the diode has two terminals; but unlike the resistor, which has a linear (straight-line) relationship between the current flowing through it and the diode has a nonlinear i - v characteristic
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Page 6 Lecture Outline ECED3201- Introduction to Electronics Introduction I. The Ideal Diode II. Terminal Characteristics of Junction Diodes III. Modeling the Diode Forward Characteristic IV. Operation in the Reverse Breakdown Region – Zener Diodes
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Page 7 I.1 Current-Voltage characteristic The ideal diode: (a) diode circuit symbol; (b) i–v characteristic; (c) equivalent circuit in the reverse direction; (d) equivalent circuit in the forward direction. The diode is a two-terminal device, with a triangular terminal, called anode, denoting the allowable direction of current flow and the bar terminal, called cathode, representing the blocking behavior of currents in the opposite direction. o If V Anode < V Cathode (in other words, If a voltage v <0 is applied to the diode where v = V Anode - V Cathode ) no current flows into the diode and it behaves as an open circuit. Diodes operated in this mode are said to be reversed biased . An ideal diode has a zero current when operated in reverse direction and it is said to be cut off, or simply off. o If a voltage V Anode > V Cathode is applied to the diode the current, i , is > 0 and a zero voltage drop appears across the diode ( v becomes 0) the diode behaves as short circuit in forward direction (it passes any current with zero voltage drop). A forward biased diode is said to be turned on, or simply on. V Anode < V Cathode V Anode > V Cathode i
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Page 8 The i - v characteristic of the ideal diode is highly nonlinear, although it consists of two straight-line segments, they are at 90 o to one another. o
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lecture2 - Introduction to Electronics ECED3201-...

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