Chapter 5 Study Outline

Chapter 5 Study Outline - C H.5:PROTEINFUNCTION...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CH. 5: PROTEIN FUNCTION 5.0: INTRODUCTION Ligand: a molecule bound reversibly by a protein; may be any kind of molecule, including  another protein.  The transient nature of protein-ligand interactions is critical to life, allow- ing an organism to respond rapidly and reversibly to changes. Binding site: a site on the protein where a ligand binds; it is complimentary to the ligand in  size, shape, charge, and hydrophobic or hydrophilic character.  The interaction is specific:  Th. Protein can discriminate among thousands of different molecules in its environment  and selectively bind only one or a few. Dramatic changes in the conformation of a protein usually result in a change in the protein’s  function. Induced fit:  changes in the conformation of any macromolecule in response to ligand bind- ing so that the biding site of the macromolecule better conforms to the shape of the ligand  (tighter binding) In a multisubunit protein, a conformational change in one subunit affects the conformation  of other subunits. The interaction between a ligand and protein can be regulated by the addition of other lig- ands, which can cause conformational changes that affect the binding of the first ligand. Enzymes are a special case of protein function; they catalyze reactions by binding and  chemically transforming other molecules. 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5.1: REVERSIBLE BINDING OF A PROTEIN TO A  LIGAND: OXYGEN-BINDING PROTEINS OXYGEN CAN BIND TO A HEME PROSTHETIC GROUP Oxygen is poorly soluble in aqueous solutions, so it cannot just be dissolved in blood serum to be  transported to other tissues. It also cannot be diffused through tissues over a long distance.  Transition metals, like iron, are used to bind oxygen, but iron by itself can cause damage to DNA  and other macromolecules.   So, Iron is incorporated into a protein-bound prosthetic group called Heme.  Heme consists of a complex organic protoporphyrin ring system that is bound to a single Fe atom  in its +2 state (Ferrous).    The nitrogen atoms bound to Fe help keep it in its +2 state instead of it’s +3 state (Ferric).    Ferrous binds oxygen reversibly, ferric does not bind oxygen. Free heme molecules (not bound to a protein) cause Fe +2  to have two open coordination  bonds When Heme is sequestered within a protein structure, the two open coordination bonds is restric- ted One by a side-chain nitrogen of a HIS residue, the other is the binding site for O 2 .
Background image of page 2
CO and NO coordinate to heme iron with a greater affinity than O 2 , and prevents O 2  from bind- ing.  By surrounding and sequestering heme, oxygen-binding proteins regulate the access of CO 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 12

Chapter 5 Study Outline - C H.5:PROTEINFUNCTION...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online