IxD1,5,6 - InequalitybyDesign Chs. 1, 5, 6 Rebuttal to...

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Inequality by Design Chs. 1, 5, 6
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Rebuttal to The Bell Curve Basic argument of The Bell  Curve Inequality is the “natural” result of inherited differences. “The skilled soar and the unskilled sink” (p. 5). Everyone benefits from this free market system of releasing talent because society will become very efficient the “best” people will fill the best jobs and do them well Society has yet to fully benefit from natural inequality because there is too much government interference that restricts the rise of the talented
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Racial Implications of the Bell Curve If economic position is a reflection of genetically endowed talent, and there are more poor people of color than poor white people . . . then, the authors of The Bell Curve conclude that the lower class position of many people of color is a “natural” consequence of their inferior genetic endowment
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Inequality by Design  is a rebuttal to the “logic” of The Bell Curve Berkeley sociologists argue for a more rigorous look at the origins of inequality and the factors that explain the growth or decline of inequality Who gets ahead and who falls behind in the competition for success? What determines how much people get for being ahead or behind? Ladder analogy: Who is on which step of the ladder and why? Is the ladder long and narrow or short and broad?
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Systems of Inequality Public policies play a key role in the creation of social inequality “Intentional policies have significantly constructed the inequalities we have . . . other policies could change those inequalities”
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Dangerous political impact of The Bell Curve Book reinforces old racist notions of inequality Ignores decades of scholarship showing that IQ scores are a reflection of prior education Book is a convenient justification for “conservative” social policies that dismiss the value of creating policies that would expand opportunities for poor and working class people
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Optimism in understanding social policy as a major factor in social inequality If we create social inequality through our social policies, then we can create greater social equality through our social policies Imply that social policies are more important than economics in our understanding of the degree and contours of inequality
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Distribution of Wealth, 2007 estimated by Prof. William Domhoff, U.C. Santa Cruz
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Inequality by Design  challenges notions that inequality in wealth reflects inequality in talent Degree of social inequality changes historically and differs across countries In order to understand differences in degree  of inequality, we need to look at the social factors that account for circumstances that accelerate or 1990 Japan top CEOs earned 16x average workers’ salary 1990 Germany top CEOs earned 21x average workers’ salary 1990 Britain top CEOs earned 25x average workers’ salary 1990 US top CEOs earned 120x average workers
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course SOCIOL 3ac taught by Professor Kelsey during the Spring '11 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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IxD1,5,6 - InequalitybyDesign Chs. 1, 5, 6 Rebuttal to...

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