Lecture 14 July 21, 2010 _Stereotyping and Prejudice_

Lecture 14 July 21, 2010 _Stereotyping and Prejudice_ -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stereotyping and Prejudice Lecture #14 July 21, 2010
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Overview content activation application change stereotype threat
Background image of page 2
Are Stereotypes Changing? Princeton Trilogy—Series of studies conducted to examine the content of stereotypes of various ethnic/racial groups (used Princeton students as subjects) Katz and Braly, 1933 Gilbert, 1951 Madon et al. (2001)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Stereotype Content 1933-2001 1933 1951 1969 2001 Superstitious 84% 41% 13% 2% Lazy 75% 31% 26% 12% Ignorant 38% 24% 11% 10% Happy-go- lucky 38% 17% 27% 0% Musical 26% 33% 47% 28% Ostentatious 26% 11% 25% 9% Very Religious 24% 17% 8% 19% Stupid 22% 10% 4% 2%
Background image of page 4
Modern Stereotypes New Stereotype of African-Americans (Madon et al., 2001) Loyal to family Loud Tradition loving Aggressive Artistic Quick tempered Revengeful Rude Old stereotypes have faded, but new stereotypes exist in their place, which possess a high degree of consensus.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Do people automatically activate stereotypes? According to Devine (1989): Everyone is aware of the AA stereotype Everyone activates the stereotype Low prejudice people, but not high prejudice people control the application of the stereotype So, Devine argues that everyone, regardless of prejudice level, activates stereotypes automatically.
Background image of page 6
Devine’s Method Subliminally primed subjects with words related to AA stereotype: Lazy Blacks Blues Basketball Then had subjects read paragraph about Donald (ambiguously hostile behaviors) and then rate how hostile Donald was. Priming with AA stereotype words increased ratings of hostility
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Donald Paragraph I ran into my old acquaintance Donald the other day, and I decided to go over and visit him, since by coincidence we took our vacations at the same time. Soon after I arrived, a salesman knocked at the door, but Donald refused to let him enter. He also told me that he was refusing to pay his rent until the landlord repaints his apartment. We talked for a while, had lunch, and then went out for a ride. We used my car, since Donald’s car had broken down that morning, and he told the garage mechanic that he would have to go somewhere else if he couldn’t Fx his car that same day. We went to the park for about an hour and then stopped at a hardware store. I was sort of preoccupied, but Donald bought some gadget, and then I heard him demand his money back from the sales clerk. I couldn’t Fnd what I was looking for, so we left and walked a few blocks to another store. The Red Cross had set up a stand by the door and asked us to donate blood. Donald lied by saying he had diabetes and therefore could not give blood. . .
Background image of page 8
Does Everyone Automatically Activate Stereotypes? Levels of Prejudice as Measured by Modern Racism
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course ECON 151A taught by Professor Miller during the Spring '06 term at UC Davis.

Page1 / 41

Lecture 14 July 21, 2010 _Stereotyping and Prejudice_ -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online