Lecture2 - Lecture 2 Introduction Why bother asking...

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Lecture 2
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 Introduction Why bother asking questions at all? Give examples of when you ask questions?
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One set of problems consists of understanding just what information you are being presented with. A second set of problems concerns deciding whether to believe the information supplied to you by others. A third set of problems arises because of the ways in which mass media structure and colour the information they present.
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We should pause here and say something about the communication of information. Obviously there is more to communication than just words. Information can be communicated in a variety of ways: through words, through gestures (body language, facial expressions, etc.), through images or pictures, through maps or diagrams, and so on. Our concern will be primarily with information communicated through written or spoken language.
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Absorbing information Sponge approach Aims at acquiring knowledge Believe in everything one read Panning-for-Gold Aims at acquiring knowledge Read with question-asking attitudes Determine what was being said and why
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The two methods compliment each other. The process that leads to the conclusion may turn out to be the most beneficial.
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Critical Thinking Previous experience is an important factor. Defend the initial beliefs – engage in weak-sense critical thinking Evaluate and revise these beliefs – engage in strong- sense critical thinking, challenging all claims
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Results Willingness to try out new answers Importance of Practice
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Statement or Assertion A claim is simply a statement or assertion. This is the most direct way of communicating information through language. Grammatically and logically, we distinguish the claims/statements/assertions/propositions from interrogations, commands/requests, exclamations.
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You encounter claims in newspapers, textbooks, conversations with friends, politicians' speeches, and just about everywhere else – ESPECIALLY the INTERNET.
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Asserting and Implying Communicating the fact that a proposition is true (or false) directly is to ASSERT (or DENY) it. There are times, quite frequently apparently,
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Lecture2 - Lecture 2 Introduction Why bother asking...

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