Lec8_2011 - Molecular motion in liquids 21.5 Experimental results Measuring techniques NMR ESR inelastic neutron scattering etc Big molecules in

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Molecular motion in liquids
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21.5 Experimental results Measuring techniques: NMR, ESR, inelastic neutron scattering, etc. Big molecules in viscous fluids typically rotate in a series of small (5 o ) steps. Small molecules in nonviscous fluid typically jump through about 1 radian (57 o ). For a molecule to move in liquid, it must acquire at least a minimum energy to escape from its neighbors. The probability that a molecule has at least an energy Ea is proportional to e -Ea/RT . Viscosity, η, is inversely proportional to the mobility of the particles, η∞ e Ea/RT
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Temperature dependence of the viscosity of water
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24.6 The conductivities of electrolyte solutions Conductance (G, siemens) of a solution sample decreases with its length l and increases with its cross-sectional area A: k is the conductivity (Sm -1 ). Molar conductivity, Λ m , is defined as: c is the molar concentration Λ m varies with the concentration due to two reasons: Based on the concentration dependence of molar conductivities,
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course SCIENCE 321 taught by Professor Aaa during the Spring '11 term at Windsor.

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Lec8_2011 - Molecular motion in liquids 21.5 Experimental results Measuring techniques NMR ESR inelastic neutron scattering etc Big molecules in

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