Lecture+8 - Titrations This curve shows how pH varies as...

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Titrations This curve shows how pH varies as 0.100 M NaOH is added to 50.0 mL of 0.100 M HCl. Calculate the pH at any point, including the equivalence point, in an acid-base titration.
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Acid-base, precipitation and redox reactions The equivalence point is the ideal (theoretical) result we seek in a titration. What we actually measure is the end point, which is marked by a sudden change in a physical property of the solution Gravimetric titration and Volumetric analysis Direct titration and Back titration
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Developed in 1883, the Kjeldahl nitrogen analysis remains one of the most accurate and widely used methods for determining nitrogen in substances such as protein, milk, cereal, and flour The solid is first digested (decomposed and dissolved) in boiling sulfuric acid, which converts nitrogen into ammonium ion
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Titration curve & solubility product Consider the titration of 25.00 mL of 0.100 0 M I with 0.050 00 M Ag+, Analyte titrant
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Precipitation titrations The equivalence point is the steepest point of the curve. It is
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course SCIENCE 321 taught by Professor Aaa during the Spring '11 term at Windsor.

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Lecture+8 - Titrations This curve shows how pH varies as...

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