Chapters_1-6

Chapters_1-6 - S YSTEMS I NTEGRATION Course Textbook Dr...

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Unformatted text preview: S YSTEMS I NTEGRATION- Course Textbook - Dr. Gerry Knapp, Ph.D., P.E. Louisiana State University Copyright © 2010 1 Systems Integration: Chapter 1 – Introduction Chapter 1 – Introduction Computer-based devices have become an integral part of modern manufacturing, and their use is growing, pushed by rapid advances in information technology. Computer automation is the use of computers (or computer-based devices) to automate control and decision tasks previously done manually or by use of fixed (non-programmable) hardware. Miniaturization, decreasing costs for microprocessors and memory, and faster CPU’s are contributing to a rapid increase in the number of “smart” (computer-based) devices in modern factories and plants. Systems Integration is the use of computers and networks to create seamless flows of data and control between different manufacturing processes and control levels into a single integrated system. Integration allows for global optimization of manufacturing operations as well as rapid dissemination of information to employees, managers, and business partners. Data and control may be integrated: • Temporally , from marketing/sales to design to manufacturing; • Vertically , from the lowest level sensors to the CEO’s office; and • Horizontally , between distributed production processes and even facilities. Computer automation and systems integration go hand-in-hand, as computerization is a fundamental prerequisite to systems integration. Figure 1.1 illustrates the different levels of control seen in many manufacturing facilities, and the types of computerized devices / systems found at each level. Figure 1.2 illustrates typical functions of each of the different levels, in this case for a process plant. This course will provide you with an overview of the different computer and information technologies used within today’s manufacturing systems. It will also introduce basic hands-on skills in working with and programming some of these technologies, such as data acquisition and programmable logic controllers. Course coverage will proceed from the lowest levels seen in Figures 1 and 2 up through the highest, as follows: • A brief review of electronic circuits to refresh your memories on the basics of circuit components and analysis. • Sensors. An introduction to the operation of commonly used sensors: how they work; the types of signals they generate. • Actuators • Intelligent Instruments and Devices 2 Systems Integration: Chapter 1 – Introduction • Data acquisition, including types of signals, signal conditioning, digital to analog and analog to digital conversion. • Logical Control, including logic analysis and design, and design for state-based and sequence-based control systems....
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course IE 4485 taught by Professor K during the Spring '11 term at LSU.

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Chapters_1-6 - S YSTEMS I NTEGRATION Course Textbook Dr...

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