6 - Minority Populations and Health Chapter 6:Healthcare Services Learning Objectives Students will be exposed to an overview of the most prevalent

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1 Minority Populations and Health Chapter 6:Healthcare Services Learning Objectives an overview of the most prevalent mental health disorders – Racial/ethnic differences in mental health morbidity – Difficulty diagnosing mental disorders – Idioms of distress and culture-bound syndromes – Risk and protective factors for mental health problems – Utilization of mental health services Students will be exposed to: Defining Health Disparities • It is important to distinguish between disparities in health status, healthcare access, quality of healthcare received, healthcare outcomes. • The cause of each of these are likely related, but they are different phenomena. • Thus, the solutions will likely be different.
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2 Box 6.1 Defining Health Status Disparities and Healthcare Disparities Health Status Disparities – “…differences that occur by gender, race or ethnicity, education or income, disability, living in rural localities or sexual orientation.” (US Department of Health and Human Services, Healthy People 2010) Healthcare Disparities – “…racial or ethnic differences in the quality of healthcare that are not due to access- related factors or clinical needs, preferences and appropriateness of interventions.” (Unequal Treatment Institute of Medicine 2002) Racial and ethnic disparities in health care exist and, because they are associated with worse outcomes in many cases, are unacceptable. Racial and ethnic disparities in health care occur in the context of broader historic and contemporary social and economic inequality, and evidence of persistent racial and ethnic discrimination in many sectors of American life. Many sources – including health systems, health care providers, patients, and utilization managers – contribute to racial and ethnic disparities in health care. SUMMARY OF FINDINGS From IOM Report SUMMARY OF FINDINGS From IOM Report, continued Bias, stereotyping, prejudice, and clinical uncertainty on the part of healthcare providers may contribute to racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare. While indirect evidence from several lines of research supports this statement, a greater understanding of the prevalence
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course HLTH 236 taught by Professor Toone during the Summer '08 term at Texas A&M.

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6 - Minority Populations and Health Chapter 6:Healthcare Services Learning Objectives Students will be exposed to an overview of the most prevalent

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