Denegall_Renaysha-Final Paper 2.docx - The Oklahoma City Bombing Renaysha Denegall Florida State University CCJ3032 Crime in Media Dr Thomas B Kelley

Denegall_Renaysha-Final Paper 2.docx - The Oklahoma City...

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The Oklahoma City Bombing Renaysha Denegall Florida State University CCJ3032: Crime in Media Dr. Thomas B. Kelley April 19, 2020
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Abstract The Oklahoma City bombing became a part of American History on April 19. 1995 when two men Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols committed a heinous crime. In response to the Waco Siege and the 70 people that died, they decided to load a truck with explosive material and leave it under the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. They were eventually caught and arrested one sentenced to death and the other sentenced to several life terms in prison. This case was highly publicized and talked about because two years earlier a similar bombing happened at the World Trade Center in New York City. Theories that link to this case and why it occurred is Realism and Reception Analysis, and Postmodernism. The media has had a lot of involvement surrounding this case and its details, though this seems to have had little effect on the outcome of this case. This case was an experience that will always be a part of history and looked on as a way to move forward.
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Introducing the Case On April 19, 1995, two men, Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols left a massive truck bomb in the parking garage under the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building’s daycare center (History.com Editors, 2010). According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, this powerful homemade bomb was constructed of agricultural fertilizer, diesel fuel, and other chemicals which detonated sometime after 9 a.m. that morning (Federal Bureau of Investigation, 2016). This building is in Oklahoma City, and as a result of their actions a third of it and 300 other buildings were damaged or destroyed (Federal Bureau of Investigation, 2016). According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, “168 people died, including 19 children, with several hundred more injured calling it the worst homegrown act of terrorism in the nation’s history” (Federal Bureau of Investigation, 2016). Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols were, “…former U.S. Army soldiers who were associated with extreme the right-wing and militant Patriot movement (Jenkins, 2020). In line with Tim McVeigh’s ideology it was also stated that he claimed this act was to avenge the 70 people who died in the Waco Siege (Jenkins, 2020). The Waco Siege occurred in Waco, Texas where federal agents raided an armed religious group called the Branch Davidian (Jenkins, 2020). McVeigh was sentenced to death and Terry Nichols was sentenced to 161 counts of first- degree murder and sentenced to 161 consecutive life terms (Pearson, 2016). McVeigh and
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