Chapter 5 Notes - Consumer behavior how individuals or...

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Consumer behavior : how individuals or groups select, purchase, use, or dispose of products as well as the needs and wants that motivate these behaviors Consumers : people who buy or use products or adopt ideas that satisfy their needs and wants Customers : specific types of consumers, they are people who buy a particular brand or patronize a specific store Prospects : potential customers who are likely to buy the product or brand Marketing communication planners need to understand what factors turn prospects into customers Influences on Consumer Decisions Cultural Influences Culture is made up of tangible items (art, literature, buildings, furniture, clothing, and music) and intangible concepts (history, knowledge, laws, morals, customs, and even standards of beauty) Norms/Values The boundaries each culture establishes for “proper” behavior are norms rules we learn through social interaction that specify or prohibit certain behaviors The source of norms are values – represent our underlying belief systems Advertisers strive to understand core values that govern peoples attitudes and guide their behavior 9 basic core values: 1. A sense of belonging 2. Excitement 3. Fun and enjoyment
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4. Warm relationships 5. Self-fulfillment 6. Respect from others 7. A sense of accomplishment 8. Security 9. Self-respect Subcultures Subcultures can be defined by geographic regions or by shared human characteristics such as age, language, or traditions and ethnic background Ex. teenagers, college students, retirees, southerners, Texans, athletes, musicians, working single mothers Corporate Culture Corporate culture describes how various companies operate Used in B2B marketing Some are formal, with many rules and rigid work hours, and some are informal, more laid back Same patterns exist in the way businesses make purchasing decisions Social Influences A person’s social environment determines your social class or group Reference groups, family, and friends influence your opinions and consumer behavior and may effect habits and biases Social Class The position you and your family occupy within society
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Determined by income, wealth, education, occupation, family presige, value of home, and neighborhood In India, more rigid cultures, people have trouble moving out of their social class, but this is not the case in America Marketers assume that people in one class buy different goods for different reasons than people in other classes Reference Groups Reference group – a group of people you use as a model for behavior in specific situations Ex. teachers, relighous leaders, racial and ethnic organizations, clubs, informal affiliations such as co-workers or peers Brand Communities – groups of people devoted to a certain brand Internet has created new online reference groups – virtual communities around interests, hobbies, and brands Reference groups have 3 functions: 1. They provide information
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course ADV 3008 taught by Professor Weigold during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Chapter 5 Notes - Consumer behavior how individuals or...

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