Ch 6 Handouts

Ch 6 Handouts - 3/31/2009 Introduction to Social Work...

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3/31/2009 1 Introduction to Social Work Becoming a Change Agent Children and Their Families 1 • Thirteen Million children (17.4%) live in poverty in the United States • One-third of the children in the US live in homes where no parent has live in homes where no parent has FT employment. • Poverty has a negative and long- lasting effect on children. 2 • Nine million children, or about 12 percent do not have health insurance have health insurance coverage, and many more do not receive regular medical care. 3
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3/31/2009 2 • In 2006, 3.3 million child abuse reports • Over 900,000 children confirmed to have been victims of abuse • 513,000 children, most under eleven years of age in foster care. • Suicide is the second leading cause of death for teens • Homicide the 3 rd leading cause of death for children 5-14 4 Why are these statistics important? • They can be used to raise awareness about and demonstrate the needs of children. • Data on the current status of children provide social workers with the information they need to advocate on individual, community and national levels for the well- being of children and their families. 5 Theories of Child Development • Legally, childhood is defined as a stage of life that begins at birth and ends at age eighteen age eighteen. • In the U.S. anyone under the age of 18 is considered to be legally dependent and is classified as a child. 6
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3/31/2009 3 Theories of Child Development • The growth period of childhood involves several developmental stages. • Understanding a child’s social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development helps social workers understand what services are needed and can best enhance the child’s well-being. 7 Theories of Child Development Ecological Approach • The ecological approach provides a framework for social workers to assess a client within the context of his or her client within the context of his or her environment. 8 Theories of Child Development Ecological Approach • First the social worker must identify the systems that affect the child’s life, such as family school peer groups and as family, school, peer groups, and neighborhood. • Social workers consider the interaction between the child and these systems, as well as larger systems (e.g., public policy). 9
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3/31/2009 4 Theories of Child Development Human Development • In addition to assessing a client and his or her interaction with the environment, it is also important to understand theories about how human beings develop throughout their lives. 10 Theories of Child Development Human Development • Human development theories describe stages and tasks that are expected throughout a child’s development throughout a child s development. • Although the stages are helpful
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course SOCW 200 taught by Professor Brethwaite during the Spring '10 term at George Mason.

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Ch 6 Handouts - 3/31/2009 Introduction to Social Work...

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