1.4 Validity, Truth, Soundness, Strength,

1.4 Validity, Truth, Soundness, Strength, - Validity,...

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Validity, Truth, Soundness, Validity, Truth, Soundness, Strength, Cogency Strength, Cogency
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Two Features of Arguments Two Features of Arguments Arguments have two parts: premises and the conclusion. The first is a factual claim – a claim about the features of the world – and the second is an inferential claim – a claim that the conclusion necessarily follows from the premises. Our task in this course is to assess good arguments. In meeting this task, we will first evaluate the inferential claim, to establish that the premises do follow from the conclusion, and then we will assess whether the factual claim is indeed true.
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Deductive Arguments A valid deductive argument is one in which it is impossible for the conclusion to be false given that the premises are true. An invalid deductive argument is one in which it is possible for the premises to be true and the conclusion be false. All deductive arguments are valid or
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course PHIL 110 taught by Professor ? during the Fall '06 term at South Carolina.

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1.4 Validity, Truth, Soundness, Strength, - Validity,...

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