Explanation of Validity and Soundness

Explanation of Validity and Soundness - Validity an...

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Validity – an argument is valid when the conclusion cannot be false given that the premises are true. That is, if you assume the premises are true and the conclusion is necessarily entailed by the premises, then the argument is valid. NOTE: VALIDITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE ACTUAL TRUTH OR FALSITY OF THE PREMISES Validity has to do with the form of the argument, not the actual truth of the premises. Example: Determine whether the following argument is valid and/or sound. (P1) George Bush is a Canadian and he presently lives in New York City. (C) Therefore, George Bush is a Canadian. A: The argument is valid, but unsound. Explanation This argument is valid because when we assume P1 is true, the conclusion has to be true. If George Bush is a Canadian, it follows that he is a Canadian. Note: this conclusion does not follow because of the truth or falsity of the premises, but because of the form of the argument. For instance: G = George Bush is a Canadian. N = George Bush presently lives in New York City.
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This note was uploaded on 02/14/2011 for the course PHIL 110 taught by Professor ? during the Fall '06 term at South Carolina.

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Explanation of Validity and Soundness - Validity an...

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